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China Market Segmentation Essays

Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China Quantitative Report April 24, 2006 © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 1 Proprietary Warning (Decima) The information contained herein is proprietary to Decima and may not be used, reproduced or disclosed to others except as specifically permitted in writing by the originator of the information. The recipient of the information, by its retention and use, agrees to protect the same and the information contained therein from loss, theft or compromise. Toronto Ottawa Montreal 2345 Yonge Street 60 Elgin Street 630 Sherbrooke St West Suite 405 Suite 1820 Suite 1101 Toronto, Ontario Ottawa, Ontario Montreal, Quebec M4P 2E5 K2P 2P7 H3A 1E4 t: (416) 962-2013 f: (416) 962-0505 t: (613) 230-2200 f: (613) 230-9048 www. decima. com t: (514) 288-0037 f: (514) 288-0138 [email protected] com Decima Research Inc. is ISO 9001:2000 Certified © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 2 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Table of Contents
The Chinese outbound travel market has witnessed explosive growth over the last three years, expanding at an average rate of 34% per year. In 2004, close to 29 million Chinese travelled overseas, with growth expected to hit 40 million in 2005. This is equivalent to every man, woman and child in Canada taking at least one international trip every year. It is no wonder that virtually every destination marketing organization, from Las Vegas to Kenya, has targeted this market in the hopes of sharing in the travel boom. For Canada, China represents an untapped market with huge potential. In 2003, Canada had only a 0. % share of the Chinese outbound market and a 3. 4% share of total long-haul tourism. With Canada on the verge of obtaining Approved Destination Status (ADS), this will soon change. For example, Australia saw a significant 30% per annum boost in Chinese arrivals in the years following its ADS approval, and travel to ADS countries in Europe has picked up substantially. In view of the imminent opening of the Chinese market, the Canadian tourism industry needs to be prepared to aggressively woo this market. With many destinations gaining ADS status ahead of Canada, competition will be intense.
Canada and the regions need to ascertain how they are perceived in the marketplace, where the opportunities are, how to position themselves going in, how to do business in this market and how to work with the Chinese travel trade. Decima Research was commissioned to conduct the Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China on behalf of the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) and a partnership group consisting of Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario. The study is intended to obtain market intelligence that will assist the Canadian tourism industry in developing appropriate marketing initiatives for the Chinese market in 2006 and beyond.
The research in China consisted of a quantitative component and a qualitative component: Quantitative Research. This consisted of a telephone survey of Chinese citizens to determine the incidence of long-haul travel in China and the potential for Canada, as well as an in-person survey of Chinese long-haul pleasure travellers to examine travel characteristics, motivations, interests and perceptions of Canada. Qualitative Research. This consisted of 30 executive interviews with the Chinese travel trade to obtain their views on opportunities for Canada and how Canada can work with the travel industry to develop the market in China.
This report covers the results of the quantitative research. The results of the qualitative component were released under separate cover (although some of the results are drawn upon in interpreting the results of the consumer survey). © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 5 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Methodology This study examines the Chinese long-haul pleasure travel market, with a particular emphasis on travel outside Asia.
For the purposes of this study, a long-haul pleasure trip was defined as a pleasure trip of four nights or more, by plane, to a destination outside of China, Hong Kong and Macau. Pleasure trips include those taken to visit friends and relatives, as well as combined business-pleasure trips. This definition is consistent with how long-haul pleasure travel was defined in previous CTC studies in the Asia-Pacific region. The consumer research focused on four key cities in China that align with Canada’s key ADS markets – Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. Within these four cities, the survey focused on the urban districts (i. . , remote/rural districts were excluded). As a result, estimates presented in this report are based only on the urban districts of these four cities. The study methodology was designed to provide accurate estimates of incidence rates and the size of the potential market for long-haul pleasure travel among the general population in China. At the same time, the study needed to provide detailed information on the behaviour and characteristics of long-haul travellers that had taken or plan to take a trip outside of Asia – a hard-to-reach, lowincidence population.
To conduct the study cost-effectively, the following methodology was used: Random telephone survey of Chinese adults. A random telephone survey was conducted with a representative sample of n=5,500 Chinese adults, aged 18 and older, in November 2005. The sample was equally split between each of the four key cities (i. e. , n=1,375 per city). This survey was used to generate accurate incidence rates for long-haul travel among the Chinese population, as well as population estimates for weighting the long-haul traveller survey.
Eligible long-haul pleasure travellers from the telephone survey were invited to participate in the in-person survey. In-person survey of long-haul pleasure travellers. A 45 to 60-minute, face-to-face survey was conducted with n=1,400 recent/potential long-haul pleasure travellers in the four markets of interest in November and December of 2005. Respondents included cooperative long-haul travellers from the random telephone survey, substantially supplemented by booster samples recruited through networking, referral sampling and street intercepts in upper class areas such as premium shopping malls and outside office buildings.
An appointment was made to conduct the survey either in-home or at a central location, and a small incentive was offered to encourage participation. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 6 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report For the in-person survey, quotas were set for various long-haul traveller groups based on destinations visited and future travel plans. For each traveller group, interviews were split across the four markets of interest. As shown below, the survey population can essentially be defined as travellers who have taken a pleasure trip of four or more nights, by plane, utside Asia in the past three years or plan to take one in the next two years. In other words, the survey population does not represent the full long-haul market in China, as those whose travel horizons do not extend beyond Asia (either past or planned) have been excluded. The sample of n=1,400 was broken down as follows: N=260 recent travellers who have visited Canada for pleasure in the past three years; N=600 recent travellers who have visited destinations outside of Asia (other than Canada) for pleasure in the past three years;
N=280 recent travellers who have only visited long-haul destinations within Asia for pleasure in the past three years, but definitely plan to travel outside Asia for pleasure in the next two years; N=260 planners who have not taken a long-haul pleasure trip in the last three years, but are definitely planning to travel outside of Asia for pleasure in the next two years. To meet the study timelines, the random telephone survey and the in-person survey were conducted in parallel. All fieldwork was conducted by Decima’s research partner in China – Market Insight.
The random telephone survey data was weighted by city, age and gender using 2004 population estimates from the Statistics Bureau in China. The random survey data was then used to derive the population estimates for weighting the long-haul traveller survey (based on the qualifying sub-sample of long-haul travellers). Because the sub-set of travellers to Canada in the random survey was too small to generate accurate weighting data, International Travel Survey (ITS) data was used to weight this group. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 7 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report
Organization of the Report The quantitative report is organized as follows: Section 2 highlights the key findings of the quantitative research; Section 3 profiles Chinese long-haul pleasure travellers, including travellers to Canada; Section 4 presents an overview of Chinese long-haul pleasure trips, including recent trips to Canada; Section 5 examines this market’s trip decision-making, planning and booking patterns; Section 6 estimates the size and characteristics of the potential market to Canada; Section 7 looks at the travel attitudes and motivations of the Chinese market, including a motivational segmentation of Chinese travellers;
Section 8 focuses on market awareness and general perceptions of Canada; Section 9 assesses product potential for Canada in the Chinese market and includes a segmentation of long-haul trips based on key product drivers; Section 10 examines the packaging of travel to Canada, including preferred destination and activity combinations; Section 11 looks at Canada’s image and competitive positioning relative to other key longhaul destinations for this market; Section 12 provides insights into travellers’ price-value perceptions of Canada vis a vis other long-haul destinations;
Section 13 assesses the potential of the Chinese market for Canada’s regions, with a particular focus on British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario who are the partners on this study; Section 14 examines media and Internet usage by Chinese long-haul pleasure travellers; and Section 15 summarizes the key marketing implications and recommendations arising from the research. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 8 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report 2. Key Findings The following are the key highlights from the consumer research in China. Market Size and Potential for Canada The size of the potential market for Chinese pleasure travel outside Asia is estimated at more than 2. 8 million travellers in Canada’s four key ADS markets – Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. Potential travellers outside Asia represent an elite group among the Chinese population at large, being better educated, more likely to hold senior positions in the government or private sector, and considerably more affluent. • Among this group, interest in visiting Canada is remarkably high, with 73% that are interested in visiting in the next five years. Among those with the highest potential for conversion (i. . , the 19% that are very interested in visiting Canada in the next two years), about two-thirds view Canada as a dream destination and close to 30% are actively considering a trip there. Clearly, some pent-up demand exists in the marketplace that should be realized soon after the market opens up. • Even conservatively, this interest translates into a market of some half million potential Chinese visitors for Canada over the next two years. Canada generally appeals to wellestablished, middle-aged families with a VFR connection, although it is the older, more wellto-do travellers that have been converted to date. While Shanghai represents the largest base of long-haul travellers, conversion may be more difficult due to the price-sensitivity of this market and a predilection for destinations closer to home. On the other hand, Guangzhou is the most well-primed market for Canada with the best potential for conversion on the basis of high interest and strong VFR linkages. Recent Travel to Canada • Due to Canada’s lack of ADS status, VFR, combined business-pleasure and combined study-pleasure make up the lion’s share of current Chinese travel to Canada.
In fact, travellers to Canada are almost as likely to be travelling with business associates as with a spouse or partner. With close to 40% of trips being VFR-driven, it is no wonder that spending quality time with friends and family is the top motivator for travel to Canada. • Aside from VFR, Chinese travellers currently come to Canada to visit its big cities and do some sightseeing, although nature shows good future growth potential. While in Canada, they like to relax, discover new things and have a little fun. • Chinese trips to Canada often span the country, with most travellers visiting both Ontario and British Columbia.
Alberta and Quebec also receive a good measure of Chinese visitation. Factoring in the length of the flight to and from China, and the Chinese tendency to take very short trips (often only a week to 10 days in duration), suggests that Canadian itineraries are very compressed. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 9 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Travel Attitudes, Interests and Motivations • Chinese travellers are curious, optimistic and status-conscious when it comes to long-haul travel. They want to see the world and how the other half lives.
They accord great value to long-haul travel and the benefits that it brings, including personal enrichment and respect from their peers. Those interested in Canada are generally more enthusiastic travellers who are keen to experience western culture and lifestyles. • Due to the emerging nature of the market, Chinese long-haul pleasure trips are still very generic and focused on broad touring and sightseeing activities. Aside from shopping and visiting attractions with wide-ranging appeal, most other vacation activities, including local culture, outdoors activities and sports, are market niches that have yet to fully develop. In terms of choosing destinations, practical considerations are at the forefront for this market. Chinese travellers look for destinations that are clean, safe, friendly, scenic and inexpensive, where visas are fairly easy to obtain. The importance of the latter should not be underestimated. Ease of obtaining visas ranks among the top three destination selection criteria for this market, being considered important by close to 95% of all potential travellers. • Chinese travellers are also driven by the status of seeing famous cities and attractions and experiencing something new and different.
Travel is very status-driven in China and part of its appeal to travellers is being able to tell friends and relatives back home about the famous sights they have seen. • Risk-Free Vacationers, Economizers and Famous Sight Seers represent the largest motivational segments among Chinese travellers (accounting for over three-quarters of the market). These segments reflect an emerging market that is still relatively inexperienced and generalized in its motivations for long-haul travel.
At present, there are no stand-out segments when it comes to interest in Canada, which is likely due to minimal awareness of what the destination has to offer. Perceptions of Canada • Canada’s major appeal among Chinese travellers is as a safe, clean and welcoming vacation destination, however, it is seen as lacking concrete attributes to pique their interest. Famous attractions and cities are the immediate key, and Canada will need to build awareness around Toronto, Vancouver, Niagara Falls, Banff and other world-class attractions to create an initial buzz.
Canada could also stand to shore up market perceptions of its scenery, as perception ratings are only lukewarm. • While nature, wildlife and parks are seen as some of Canada’s strongest product offerings, these will need to be tied in with general touring and sightseeing as they are not yet standalone activities. Canada is also perceived as having strengths in terms of winter and outdoors products that will undoubtedly come into play down the road, but are not currently mass-market drivers. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 10 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report •
Although there is good overall awareness of and interest in Canada as a whole, awareness of specific attractions, signature travel experiences and regional characteristics is poor. Ontario and British Columbia attract the most attention from Chinese travellers, primarily focused around Toronto and Vancouver. However, beyond big cities and scenic attributes, Chinese perceptions of these regions are very vague. Ontario’s primary appeal is Niagara Falls, while British Columbia (specifically Vancouver) is seen as being a good VFR destination with large Chinese communities and a good place to experience a foreign culture in a familiar environment. Canada’s market entry strategy and inaugural campaigns will need to incorporate heavy awareness-building to improve awareness of Ontario and BC’s specific tourism attributes, enhance the awareness and appeal of lesser known regions such as Alberta and Quebec, and weave a distinct image and character for each region of the country. As the Chinese market matures, there should also be good opportunities for places like Atlantic Canada and the North. Competitive Positioning • Beyond skiing and outdoors activities, Canada does not have clear-cut perceptual strengths relative to its competitors.
This is not surprising in view of the fact that Canada has not begun its marketing efforts in earnest. Even its worldwide reputation for nature and scenery has not fully extended to Chinese travellers, who tend to think of Australia first for these products. In fact, Australia is Canada’s closest competitor, having many of the same products and strengths, but with the added bonus of being closer and more well-established in the marketplace. • Canada is solidly positioned for Risk-Free Travel, although Australia and Switzerland are close competitors on this front.
Canada is felt to deliver on most of the key attributes this group seeks when they travel (e. g. , safe, clean, healthy, friendly), but needs to strengthen market perceptions of its scenery. • Canada is also highly competitive on the Outdoor Adventure dimension, being perceived as a market leader by the Chinese. While this area offers good potential down the road, at present, it remains a very small market niche. Canada will also be in a good position to compete on the Traditional travel dimension once the market is fully open and tour products are more readily available. •
In terms of price-value perceptions, Canada is in an excellent starting position, viewed as delivering good value at a reasonable price. However, Australia is the clear winner, being seen as tops in value for the lowest cost. While Canada cannot compete with Australia on cost, it can certainly improve its perceived value by enhancing awareness of its cities, attractions and scenery, and by highlighting uniquely Canadian vacation experiences. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 11 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report 3.
Overview of Chinese Long-Haul Pleasure Travellers This section of the report examines the demographic characteristics of recent Chinese long-haul pleasure travellers. Demographics of Recent Long-Haul Travellers As shown in Exhibit 3. 1, recent long-haul pleasure travellers from China span all ages, with the exception of seniors who represent only 3% of the market. Most are married, with close to 40% who have children under 18 living at home. About half have household incomes of 10,000 RMB per month (CDN$17,400 per year) or more, and close to three-quarters are college or university educated.
Compared with the Chinese adult population as a whole, long-haul travellers are an elite group, being better educated and more likely to hold senior positions in the government (16%) or private sector (25%). Not surprisingly, income is a driving force for long-haul travel, with long-haul travellers being considerably more affluent than the population at large. This suggests that the long-haul market will continue to grow as the Chinese middle class expands and incomes continue along their upward trend.
To a great extent, the age distribution of long-haul travellers mirrors that of the Chinese adult population, except for an over-representation of the 55 to 64 group and proportionately fewer seniors. According to the trade, those over the age of 65 tend to travel domestically rather than taking outbound trips. EXHIBIT 3. 1 – SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF RECENT LONG-HAUL PLEASURE TRAVELLERS Recent Long-Haul Travellers (n=1,140) Chinese Adult Population (n=5,500) Male 54% 50% Female 46% 50% 18 to 24 11% 12% 25 to 34 21% 22% 35 to 44 28% 4% 45 to 54 15% 19% 55 to 64 22% 12% 65 or older 3% 11% Gender Age © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 12 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Recent Long-Haul Travellers (n=1,140) Chinese Adult Population (n=5,500) Single / never married 20% 22% Married / partnered 78% 76% Separated / divorced / widowed 2% 2% 38% 40% 23% 56% Marital Status Have Children in Household Under 18 Yes Education High school or less Technical / Vocational high school 5% 7% College 45% 17% University or above 8% 20% Employed full-time/part-time 74% 56% Housewife / homemaker 2% 7% Unemployed 1% 7% Retired 17% 22% Student 6% 5% Employment Status Occupation Government/State: Middle/High Rank 16% 7% Government/State: Technician/Worker 16% 26% Foreign/JV/Private: Manager or above 25% 7% Foreign/JV/Private: Staff / worker 17% 37% Culture / Education / Science 9% 7% Freelance / Self-Employed 15% 16% Other 2% 1% Below 7,000 24% 83% 7,000 to 9,999 27% 8% 10,000 to 19,999 34% 6% 20,000 or above 15% 3% 24% – Average Monthly Household Income (RMB)
Close Friends or Relatives Living in Canada Yes © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 13 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Recent Travellers to Canada Exhibit 3. 2 shows the demographic breakdown for recent travellers to Canada, compared with recent travellers to other destinations outside Asia and recent travellers within Asia. Demographically, travellers to Canada are generally more similar to the Outside Asia group than the Within Asia group, which is to be expected.
Recent travellers to long-haul destinations within Asia have the least amount of education, command the lowest household incomes and are the most likely to be staff / workers rather than management. Their lower social standing means they are less likely to be able to afford trips beyond Asia. However, they are also younger than the other two groups (i. e. , fewer over 55), so their incomes and social status may yet increase with age. By comparison, travellers outside Asia are a more upscale group, with better education, higher incomes and more senior positions in the workforce.
They are also older, with 26% over the age of 55. Recent travellers to Canada are older still, with fully a third that are 55 plus. Consistent with their mature years, these travellers are more likely to be married (84%), with almost a quarter that are retired. Like travellers Outside Asia, travellers to Canada are a well-educated group, with over threequarters who have post-secondary education. Travellers to Canada are the most likely of the three groups to hold managerial positions in private, joint venture or foreign firms (35%) and are also the most well-to-do (by Chinese standards).
Over 60% have incomes in excess of 10,000 RMB per month, compared with around half of travellers outside Asia, around 40% of travellers within Asia, and under 10% of the population at large. Notably, 60% of those who went to Canada have close friends or relatives living there, compared with less than a fifth of those who went to other destinations. Key Finding Older and more affluent, travellers to Canada represent an elite group, both within the Chinese population as a whole, and among the more select group of long-haul travellers.
In addition, having friends and relatives in Canada is a major catalyst for visitation. This is not surprising given that much of the current travel to Canada is VFR-driven in the absence of ADS. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 14 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report EXHIBIT 3. 2 – SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF RECENT TRAVELLERS TO CANADA VS. OTHER DESTINATIONS Canada (n=260) Outside Asia (n=600) Within Asia (n=280) Total (n=1,140) 55% 55% 51% 54% 45% 45% 49% 46% 18 to 24 7% 12% 12% 11% 25 to 34 6% 22% 22% 21% 35 to 44 29% 28% 27% 28% 45 to 54 13% 12% 22% 15% 55 to 64 29% 23% 16% 22% 65 or older 5% 3% 1% 3% Gender Male Female Age Marital Status Single / never married 14% 22% 20% 20% Married / partnered 84% 76% 79% 78% Separated / divorced / widowed 1% 2% 2% 2% 40% 38% 36% 38% High school or less 22% 21% 27% 23% Technical / Vocational high school 3% 5% 7% 5% College 47% 47% 38% 45% University or above 29% 27% 28% 28% Employed full-time/part-time 70% 73% 78% 74% Housewife / homemaker 2% 2% 3% 2% Unemployed 0% 1% 0% 1% Retired 24% 17% 13% 17% Student % 7% 7% 6% 15% 16% 17% 16% Have Children in Household Under 18 Yes Education Employment Status Occupation Government/State: Middle/High Rank Government/State: Technician/Worker 12% 16% 18% 16% Foreign/JV/Private: Manager or above 35% 26% 18% 25% Foreign/JV/Private: Staff / worker 12% 15% 23% 17% Culture / Education / Science 8% 10% 9% 9% Freelance / Self-Employed 16% 16% 12% 15% Other 3% 1% 3% 2% Average Monthly Household Income (RMB) Below 7,000 16% 22% 34% 24% 7,000 to 9,999 22% 27% 28% 27% 10,000 to 19,999 41% 35% 29% 34% 20,000 or above 21% 16% 10% 5% 60% 19% 18% 24% Close Friends or Relatives Living in Canada Yes © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 15 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Planners Planners are those who have not taken a long-haul pleasure trip in the last three years, but plan (definitely or very likely) to travel outside of Asia in the next two years. Compared with recent longhaul travellers, planners are far younger, with less education, lower ranking positions in the workforce and commensurately lower incomes (see Exhibit 3. ). With close to 45% who have incomes of under 7,000 RMB per month (CDN$12,200 per year), they are less likely to have the financial wherewithal to afford long-haul travel. Planners likely consist of different slices of the Chinese market, including a combination of first-time long-haul travellers who are adventurous enough to journey outside Asia on their first long-haul trip, as well as more experienced long-haul travellers who have temporarily curtailed long-haul travel in the wake of 9/11, SARS, the Asian tsunami and other recent events.
Being able to realize their longhaul travel plans likely depends to a large degree on the external environment, including continued strong economic performance, income growth, and the absence of major threats to health and safety. EXHIBIT 3. 3 – KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RECENT TRAVELLERS AND PLANNERS Compared with Recent Travellers, Planners tend to… • Be younger (52% under 35, vs. 32% of recent travellers) • Be single (36% vs. 20%) • Be less educated (32% with a high school education or less vs. 23%) • Have a technical/vocational education (13% vs. 5%) • Earn less (43% with monthly incomes of less than 7,000 RMB per month vs. 4%) • Have a lower-ranking position in government or private enterprise (51% classified as staff/worker rather than management vs. 33%) Note: Only statistically different differences are shown. Recent travellers (n=1,140); Planners (n=260). © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 16 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report 4. Overview of Chinese Long-Haul Pleasure Trips This section profiles the trips taken by recent long-haul pleasure travellers and looks at how trips to Canada differ from those taken to destinations outside and within Asia.
Frequency of Long-Haul Pleasure Travel Total Number of Long-Haul Pleasure Trips Exhibit 4. 1 shows that the vast majority of recent long-haul travellers have taken only one long-haul pleasure trip in the last three years. About a fifth have taken two such trips, while 10% are more frequent long-haul travellers who have taken three or more trips. EXHIBIT 4. 1 – NUMBER OF LONG-HAUL PLEASURE TRIPS TAKEN IN THE LAST THREE YEARS 69% 1 trip 21% 2 trips 3 trips 6% 4 trips 2% 5 or more Trips 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Long Haul Travellers (n=1,140) Mean=1. 49 trips © Decima Research Inc. decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 17 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Number of Long-Haul Pleasure Trips by Destination Exhibit 4. 2 shows the average number of pleasure trips of four or more nights taken by recent Chinese long-haul travellers to various destinations in the last three years, as well as the market share of each destination. Not surprisingly, Asia captures the largest market share (34%), followed by Europe (29%) and Australia/New Zealand (16%). Canada has a 9% market share (or 10% if combined Canada-US travel is included).
Note that these figures do not represent the share of the full long-haul pleasure travel market, which would be much lower due to the inclusion of a substantial segment of people who only travel within Asia (the survey sample only includes those who have travelled or plan to travel outside Asia). The criterion of four nights or more, by plane, would also eliminate some long-haul trips from the analysis. EXHIBIT 4. 2 – NUMBER OF LONG-HAUL PLEASURE TRIPS TAKEN TO DIFFERENT DESTINATIONS IN THE LAST THREE YEARS Average Number of Trips Market Share Within Asia 0. 57 34% Canada only 0. 2 9% US only 0. 13 9% Canada and the US 0. 03 1% The Caribbean / West Indies 0. 00 0% Australia / New Zealand 0. 21 16% Europe 0. 40 29% Other destinations 0. 02 2% TOTAL 1. 49 100% Notes: Base is long-haul travellers in the last three years (n=1,140). Market share measured by total trips to destination as a percentage of total trips taken. Average number of trips do not sum to total due to rounding. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 18 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Characteristics of Recent Long-Haul Pleasure Trips
Destinations Visited Outside Asia Australia tops the list of destinations visited on the most recent trip Outside Asia (see Exhibit 4. 3). Australia is a perennial favourite among the Chinese due to its proximity, comparatively low cost, comfortable climate and wide range of things to see and do. France and the UK follow closely behind, with almost a fifth who visited these destinations on their most recent trip outside Asia. France is a gateway into Europe and is considered a “must-see” by the Chinese, while the recent opening of the UK to ADS travel has boosted its popularity.
The US and Germany round out the top five destinations for the Outside Asia group. Both are popular business destinations, and Germany has also begun to attract considerable FIT travel. Switzerland, Italy and New Zealand are other popular destinations for travel outside of Asia. Note that Canada is not included in this exhibit as this question was only asked to the Outside Asia group (i. e. , those who travelled Outside of Asia, but not to Canada). EXHIBIT 4. 3 – DESTINATIONS VISITED ON MOST RECENT TRIP OUTSIDE OF ASIA Australia 25% France 19% United Kingdom 19%
Mainland USA 16% Germany 14% Switzerland 9% Italy 9% New Zealand 6% Other Europe 6% 2% Hawaii Spain 2% 2% South Africa Greece 1% Guam/American Samoa/Saipan 1% Mexico 1% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Travellers outside of Asia (n=600) Notes: Base is those who travelled outside of Asia in the past three years, but not to Canada. Percentages may sum to more than 100% due to multiple responses. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 19 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report Destinations Visited Within Asia Exhibit 4. shows the top destinations for the Within Asia group. Thailand is a well-entrenched favourite among Chinese travellers, so its number one position is not surprising. Over 40% of the Within Asia group chose this destination on their most recent trip. Singapore (31%) and Malaysia (24%) are also very popular in the Chinese market and have been for many years. Japan (22%) and South Korea (12%) are hot new destinations, appealing to the Chinese on the basis of their pop culture as well as their tourism attributes. EXHIBIT 4. 4 – DESTINATIONS VISITED ON MOST RECENT LONG-HAUL TRIP WITHIN ASIA 3% Thailand 31% Singapore 24% Malaysia 22% Japan 12% South Korea 8% Other Southeast Asia 4% Former USSR (CIS) 3% Philippines South Asia 2% Indonesia 2% Taiwan (ROC) 1% 1% Other Asia 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Travellers within Asia (n=280) Notes: Base is those who travelled only within Asia in the last 3 years, but plan to travel outside Asia in the next 2 years. Percentages may sum to more than 100% due to multiple responses. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified 20 Consumer and Travel Trade Research in China – Quantitative Report
Destinations Visited in Canada As shown in Exhibit 4. 5, Ontario (85%) and British Columbia (80%) are the top destinations visited on the most recent trip to Canada. In fact, the majority of Chinese travellers to Canada (66%) visit both provinces. This is likely because many travellers fly into Vancouver and spend some time there before moving onto Ontario. Alberta (19%), Quebec (15%) and the Rocky Mountain region (14%) also receive a good measure of Chinese visitation. However, few travellers currently go to Northern or Atlantic Canada.
Approximately a fifth of travellers also visited the US on their most recent trip to Canada, while 7% visited a destination within Asia. EXHIBIT 4. 5 – DESTINATIONS VISITED ON MOST RECENT TRIP TO CANADA 85% Ontario 80% British Columbia 19% Alberta Quebec 15% Rocky Mountains 14% Atlantic Canada / East coast 3% Northern Canada 1% Other 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Travellers to Canada (n=260) Note: Percentages may sum to more than 100% due to multiple responses. © Decima Research Inc. | decima. com | ISO 9001:2000 Certified

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