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Csc Catalyst Review Essays

CSC CATALYST O VERVIEW 2009-10-30 CSC Catalyst is the property of Computer Sciences Corporation © 2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation All rights reserved under the laws of the United States of America and International law Printed in the United States of America SMCSC Catalyst is a Service Mark of Computer Sciences Corporation No part of this product may be reproduced by any means, nor transmitted, nor translated into a machine language without the written permission of Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Catalyst Licensing Information
Specifically defined collections of CSC CatalystSM framework products may be licensed to third parties external to CSC. The remaining products—practice guides, service offerings, procedure guides, white papers, and collections of best practices—may not be licensed to third parties external to CSC. CSC Catalyst Product Categories Catalyst Framework Catalyst framework products contain primary, custodial, and governing processes that represent a core set of CSC best practices refined to a common architecture.
These processes are repeatable and independent of tailored techniques, technologies, or problem areas. The inte nded audience for a framework product is a mid- to senior-level practitioner, though the content can be used by anyone. In addition to processes, framework products define roles, work products, and techniques necessary to execute the processes. Examples of primary processes include Vision and Strategy, Architecture, Development, Integration, Deployment, and Operationa l Services. Examples of governing processes include Enterprise and Account
Management, Program Management, Project Management, Service Management, an d Architecture and Engineering Management. Examples of custodial processes include Configuration Management, Quality Management, Release Management, and Risk Management. Practice Guides Practice guides extend architected bodies of knowledge (such as Catalyst framework products) with tips and guidance (for example, methods, techniques, or work products) into tailored engagement or problem types applicable in the field.
Methodology practice guides apply the Catalyst framework to a particular engagement type, customer set, tool set, or other un ique situation of business value to CSC. They supplement the framework with tips and guidance appropriate to the target audience and may use structures, terms, or techniques that extend the current Catalyst release. They may also contain valuable methodology and other ideas not yet integrated into a Catalyst r elease. Service Offerings Service offerings are offerings to customers that are supported by methodology assets and by other assets such as program and project plans and training.
Procedure Guides Procedure guides are developed for standard, highly repeatable procedures. Procedure guides provide detailed, step-by-step tasks, roles, work products, templates, tailoring guidelines, definitions, and samples and identify the responsible person by role (for example, system architect). Procedure guides can be tailored into procedures for specific business situations, projects, or organizations. White Papers White papers are loosely structured documentations of innovations, project experiences, case studies, and research.
White papers are used to accelerate the capture and diffusion of knowledge developed in the field, and can provide input to framework products, practice guides, service offerings, and pro cedure guides. Collections of Best Practices Collections of best practices use Catalyst framework concepts to structure loosely defined sets of methods, techniques, or procedures that have general applicability across CSC accounts. These collections represent the first attempt to group what might later become a set of framework activities.
Collections are typically developed for emerging business to achieve cost effectiveness and efficiency for CSC and the customer. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 III Contents CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION TO CATALYST 1 -1 What Is Catalyst? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1-1 Why Use Catalyst? …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1-2 CHAPTER 2 – CATALYST GUIDING PRINCIPLES 2 -1 Deliver Results That Satisfy Customer Priorities ………………………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………… 2-1 Align Solutions with the Business Vision ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. -1 Reuse Knowledge to Solve a Specific Business Need …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2-2 Guide Solutions with an Architecture …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2-2 Foster Partnerships and Joint Ownership of Results ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. -2 Achieve Operational Excellence and Quality Results Through Process Improvement and Innovation……………………………………………. 2-3 Orchestrate All Aspects of Change ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2-3 Deliver Early Business Benefits Through Frequent Successes …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2-3 CHAPTER 3 – THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK 3 -1
Introduction to the Catalyst Framework …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-1 Catalyst Framing Concepts ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3-1 Catalyst Framework Components …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. -2 Domains of Change in Catalyst ………………………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………… 3-2 Model Views in Catalyst …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3-4 Units of Scope in Catalyst ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. -5 Business Scope in Catalyst………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3-7 Work Scope in Catalyst ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3-7 Solution Scope in Catalyst …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. -7 Using Units of Scope…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-8 Multiple Levels for Each Dimension of Scope ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3-8 Interactions Among Dimensions of Scope ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. -8 The Catalyst Box of Boxes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-9 Life-Cycle Phases in Catalyst ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-10 Management Areas in Catalyst …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. -12 Process Enablement Paths in Catalyst ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-13 Processes in Catalyst………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-15 Activities in Catalyst ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… -17 Work Products in Catalyst ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3-17 Work Product Models ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3-18 Solution Design Models ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… -20 Supporting Models …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3-21 Roles in Catalyst …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3-22 Techniques in Catalyst …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. -23 CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 1-1 CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION TO CATALYST Catalyst provides a proven approach for delivering business -to-business products and services for today’s complex and rapidly changing needs. Catalyst’s unique approach converts world -class experience in solving business problems into practical knowledge that can be applied to a broad range of customer needs in the public and private sectors. What Is Catalyst?
Catalyst is a methodology for providing solutions to b usiness problems and meeting ongoing customer needs. Field-tested processes, techniques, roles, and work products are guided by a set of principles and unique organizing concepts to help perform the planning, analysis, development, operational support, and management necessary to achieve desired outcomes. Catalyst is a vehicle for leveraging successful experience —it reflects new and evolving business and technology best practice and captures that experience in a variety of documents and templates, referred to as knowledge assets.
These knowledge assets are available in electronic printed form for use by the Catalyst practitioner—anyone applying the Catalyst methodology to service contracts and engagements. The Catalyst methodology is designed to provide: ? Holistic perspective. Catalyst looks at a business problem from six perspectives—business process, organization, location, data, applications, and technology. Business needs are determined and addressed using these perspectives throughout the life of a servic e contract or engagement to help achieve integrated and acceptable solutions. Solution-driven models. The Catalyst approach to solution development uses integrated sets of work products that evolve in progressively more detail over the life of an engagemen t. These sets form models of requirements, designs, and development results that can be used to define baselines. Progress can be measured, not solely in terms of the effort expended or the processes and techniques used to generate them, but also by lookin g at how well the state of the models demonstrates that the evolving solution meets requirements and expectations. Full life-cycle support. The Catalyst life cycle addresses a business problem or need from vision through solution development and operation. Consistent, effective operational performance is an important goal reflected in the Catalyst approach. Management and architecture coordination are integrated with the life cycle so that the necessary parts of the solution will be constructed and come together when needed and so that the solution will continue to yield the expected outcomes after the program or project completes. Solution alignment and traceability. Catalyst requires that the developing solution be aligned with a comprehensive architecture baseline, which defines the business vision, user needs, and technology direction. This architecture baseline helps guide the solution from design through completion. Requirements and specifications are represented in the architecture and connected through specific work products, so that the solution can be traced back to its source requirements. ? Adaptable and tailorable framework.
Catalyst methodology components can be selected and customized for different levels of service contracts or engagements, from multi-enterprise to business area and from large, complex solutions to relatively simple ones. While framework conventions and formats remain consistent, Catalyst contains multiple entry CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 INTRODUCTION TO CATALYST 1-2 points, and the content of product- or service-oriented deliverables can be scaled to the required levels.
Catalyst is flexible enough to absorb and integrate specific customer methodology needs. The Box of Boxes illustrates the breadth of areas addressed by Catalyst. A specific service contract or engagement does not necessarily include all life-cycle phases and management areas, but the fact that they are available and already integrated is one of the strengths of Catalyst. LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT Service Management Operational Services Enterprise & Portfolio Management Deployment Program Management Integration Project Management Development Architecture & Engineering Mgmt Architecture Management Support Processes
Vision & Strategy Catalyst Box of Boxes ? Extensibility and maintainability. Catalyst keeps pace with emerging technology, business best practice, and changing customer needs through the evolution of its framework. Processes, techniques, roles, and work products are frequently added to reflect new technical approaches or types of business solu tions. Existing approaches may also be enriched in content or supplemented by new components. This framework evolution is facilitated and controlled by a well -defined asset engineering process and the metamodel underlying the Catalyst architecture.
Because of the metamodel, new approaches and relationships among methodology elements can quickly and easily be incorporated in Catalyst without compromising its overall integrity. Thus Catalyst can remain internally consistent and robust while responding flexibl y and dynamically to new methodology needs. Why Use Catalyst? Catalyst is robust enough to address a wide variety of business needs —in size, focus, and complexity—yet flexible enough to adapt to particular situations. It offers the following advantages: ? Speed to business results with quality and consistency.
Catalyst’s non-prescriptive format avoids activities that unnecessarily lengthen the process for delivering solutions where time to market is important. Knowledge reuse and methods such as accelerated development, workshops, and prototyping promote both quality and faster progress. ? Designing for operability. Catalyst provides a long-term perspective for the solution and its continuity in business operation. Each phase in the life cycle refines and advanc es the solution design with a focus on ultimate use and operation.
CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 INTRODUCTION TO CATALYST 1-3 ? Unified approach to enabling enterprise transformation. Catalyst provides a cohesive set of concepts and vocabulary that clarify communication, thereby enabling more effective performance of teams across all levels of the business (such as leadership, development, and sponsorship) and throughout the service contract or engagement life cycle. ? Adapting to technology change.
Catalyst constantly evolves to exploit emerging technologies, such as W eb- and knowledge-based solutions. The Catalyst framework can incorporate new processes, work products, roles, and techniques to meet new demands. ? Process efficiency and effectiveness. Throughout solution development and operation, Catalyst constantly encourages process improvement and consistency (for repeatability) through the use of process design, workshops, prototyping, organizational learning, and other techniques. ? Support for industry standards compliance.
Compliance to industry standards is integral to the Catalyst framework, so that Catalyst can be used in support of an integrated compliance strategy. Catalyst maps to key areas of ISO 9001, the Software Engineering Institute Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), and the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). ? Knowledge environment of reusable best practice. Catalyst is the foundation of a comprehensive library of common processes reflecting best practice backed by proven experience.
This environment makes rapid evolution of reusable kn owledge assets possible by making them available to other Catalyst practitioners. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 2-1 CHAPTER 2 – CATALYST GUIDING PRINCIPLES Catalyst is based on strongly held beliefs about how business-to-business services including management consulting, information technology (IT) consulting, systems integration, information systems (IS) outsourcing, and business processing outsourcing should be pursued.
The Catalyst guiding principles serve as the foundation for applying Catalyst and are inherent in the design of the methodology. Consistent focus on these principles during a service contract or engagement contributes to building sound, continuing customer relationships and supports the discipline needed to achieve business results. Deliver Results That Satisfy Customer Priorities Guide Solutions with an Architecture Achieve Operational Excellence and Quality Results Reuse Knowledge Align Solutions with the Business Vision Orchestrate All Aspects of Change Foster
Partnerships and Joint Ownership Deliver Early Business Benefits dj9b1701c Catalyst Guiding Principles Deliver Results That Satisfy Customer Priorities Customer needs and expectations often evolve with the design and development of the solution. Without customer involvement throughout the life cycle or an effective way of defining, managing, and tracing evolving requirements, the resulting solution may not meet user expectations on delivery or perform as intended. Catalyst recognizes that customer environments and user requirements are constantly changing.
Catalyst provides techniques for continuous, active user involvement in analysis, design, and development so that the evolving solution will align with the user’s increasing understanding. For situations where detailed requirements documentation is critical, Catalyst provides effective techniques for defining, tracking, managing, and updating requirements. Align Solutions with the Business Vision Successful change begins when business leaders develop a picture of where they want the enterprise to be in the future and communicate that vision to the organization.
Real izing the CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 2-2 CATALYST GUIDING PRINCIPLES vision requires clear and effective mechanisms for capturing the business vision and aligning solutions to that vision. In Catalyst, architectural, design, and operational decisions are made in the context of the desired future state. Analysis of the present state is performed only when needed to clarify the vision and for effective transition planning. Reuse Knowledge to Solve a Specific Business Need
Solutions typically include elements that are repetitive or similar to those developed as part o f previous solutions. The ability to quickly obtain and repeatedly adapt knowledge for reuse can yield significant gains in development or service productivity, time to market, and operational excellence. Catalyst provides a robust set of reusable knowledg e components that can be adapted to the unique aspects of each business problem or need. These components consist of processes, techniques, roles, and work products that can be combined, scaled, and tailored for a wide variety of solutions.
Catalyst is also designed to facilitate the integration of new best practices in emerging areas and technologies, which can be readily applied in the form of reusable knowledge components. Guide Solutions with an Architecture Achieving significant and timely business res ults usually requires that organizations commit to business and technical direction long before all facts and requirements are known. The benefits of standardization, integration, flexibility, maintainability, and cost -effectiveness gained from a unifying architecture outweigh the risks of having to modify that architecture later in the face of new information.
In Catalyst, decisions that affect the solution are made within the context of an architecture that defines the solution baseline. This architecture reflects the business vision, contains a comprehensive definition of requirements across domains of change, and aligns development of the solution through the use of model views. Important information and business decisions are reflected by updates to the architecture. Foster Partnerships and Joint Ownership of Results User and development teams should share responsibility for verifying that requirements are being adequately addressed during development of the solution.
Frequent communication and interaction throughout development is important for making sure that the delivered solution provides the intended business value. Catalyst encourages cooperative partnership among all stakeholders through its use of interactive methods. It facilitates active user participation throughout all processes, including critical points in the lifecycle, in order to clarify expectations and build and maintain consensus. Catalyst strongly encourages participative relationships with goals, risks, and benefits shared among all parties. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation.
CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 2-3 CATALYST GUIDING PRINCIPLES Achieve Operational Excellence and Quality Results Through Process Improvement and Innovation Achieving significant results in quality or consistent operational performance requires that technology be applied and managed appropriately and in suppo rt of efficient processes. Gains are limited if a quick-fix approach is taken or if leading-edge technology is applied for its own sake, such as automating a small set of processes without determining that automation is needed and verifying that it is effective.
The costs of operating and maintaining the technology may even exceed the original benefits of implementing it. Catalyst encourages the application of technology and business best practice to improve and maintain efficient, consistent processes. In contrast to focusing on individual tasks, Catalyst focuses on cross-functional business flow and the potential of technology that can bring about measurably improved business results. Interactive methods and approaches provide a means for users to assess the potential business impacts of the technology and more clearly define and assure quality in the end results. Orchestrate All Aspects of Change
New information systems alone do not transform a business. Many solutions —no matter how functionally effective, economically efficient, or technically elegant—will not fully realize their potential business value until they are integrated into the business along with the supporting behavioral change. Catalyst provides effective tools to address the drivers of chang e—leadership, culture, commitment, capabilities, structure, communication, and performance. Catalyst also describes when to involve leaders from the business to validate their needs and expectations and to position the solution for success by ensuring thei r participation.
Deliver Early Business Benefits Through Frequent Successes Creation of business value is brought about by the delivery of solutions, including the effective use of services. For large, complex service contracts and engagements, value shoul d be demonstrated by early and consistent delivery of results. Deferring the realization of value until the final delivery of the solution imposes risk that customer expectations may not match the outcome and that the result may not be workable. In addition, opportunities are lost to add momentum to the development of the final roduct through customer feedback and reinforcement. Catalyst divides big, high-risk service contracts and engagements into smaller, more manageable pieces in order to more frequentl y and consistently deliver measurable, added value. Each delivery provides an opportunity to validate the work -in-progress against expectations. Repeated deliveries promote process consistency and provide opportunities to improve processes. In this way they create the potential for solutions to become self-funding as the business benefits of each success more than offset ongoing development costs .
CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-1 CHAPTER 3 – THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Introduction to the Catalyst Framework The Catalyst methodology framework consists of framework elements. These are categorized as framing concepts, components, and topics and techniques, as shown in the figure Catalyst Framework Elements. Catalyst Framework Elements The framework elements provide the concepts and the vocabulary that the Catalyst practitione r uses to plan the structure of a service contract or engagement: ?
The framing concepts guide the practitioner in arranging the components into an effective whole that achieves the desired result. ? The topics and techniques can be used to help understand and effectively deploy the framing concepts and components. Catalyst Framing Concepts Catalyst framing concepts guide the selection and adaptation of Catalyst framework components to address service contracts and engagements. The framing concepts consist of t he domains of CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 -2 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK change, model views, units of scope, the Box of Boxes, paths, stages, processes, and activity blocks. The Case Study in the Applying Catalyst chapter presents examples of applying the framing concepts. Catalyst Framework Components Catalyst framework components—activities, roles, and work products—are building blocks. When applying Catalyst, the Catalyst practitioner selects preassembled sets of framework components and techniques, guided by the Catalyst framing concepts, and tailors them for the specific service contract or engagement.
The framework components and techniques are interrelated for efficient selection, tailoring, and execution. For example, the selection of a specific work product influences the selection of activities. This selection, in turn, influences the selection of roles and techniques. In the figure, Activities, Work Products, Roles, and Techniques, the arrows depict these interactions. Activities, Work Products, Roles, and Techniques Domains of Change in Catalyst Catalyst looks at a business problem and the impact of change from six perspectives, known as the domains of change.
These domains are shown in the figure Catalyst Domains of Change. The business problem or need should be clearly defined in terms of the degre e of impact in each domain. Together, the domains help define the problem scope, measure the impact resulting from the proposed change or service level agreement, estimate the work needed, and integrate the work effort. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-3 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK ORGANIZATION BUSINESS PROCESS LOCATION DATA TECHNOLOGY
APPLICATION dj981501c Catalyst Domains of Change The domains of change are: ? Business process. The business process domain focuses on what the customer does, how activities are carried out and in what sequence, what rules are followed, and the type of results obtained. Change in the business process domain is o ften a key driver for change in all the other domains. ? Organization. The organization domain focuses on the people and organizations involved in the change: their culture, capabilities, roles, team structures, and organizational units. ? Location.
The location domain focuses on where the customer conducts business. This applies to physical facilities where people and technology reside, such as a branch office or data center, and to location types, including logical addresses such as user IDs. Locations may include customer and vendor sites as well as internal client sites. ? Data. The data domain focuses on the content, structure, relationships, and business rules for the data used by the business processes, applications, and organization. It also considers the transformations needed to result in information and knowledge that the customer can use. Application. The application domain focuses on the capabilities, structure, and user interface of software applications and application components used to support the change. Applications or components may be specific to the customer’s industry or operation, such as Enterprise Resource Planning, or they may be general in nature, such as a word processing program or an electronic spreadsheet. ? Technology. The technology domain focuses on the hardware, system software, and communications infrastructure used to enable and support solutions and services.
Change in the technology domain is often a key driver for change in other domains. Each domain is associated with work products, roles, and techniques that help enable and support the change for that domain. For an illustration of this association see the figure Framework Components Within a Domain. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-4 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK ORGANIZATION BUSINESS PROCESS LOCATION WP…………. …………………….. …………………….. …………………….. …………………….. ……………………. …………………….. Work Products Roles TECHNOLOGY DATA Techniques APPLICATION dj981502c Framework Components Within a Domain Model Views in Catalyst Model views link areas of change impact to the development of the solution or service. There is a model view for each domain of change—business process, organization, location, application, data, and technology. Other model views, such as the Business Model View and the System Engineering Model View, reflect an overall perspective; that is, they help provide integration and coordination across all model views.
The figure Catalyst Model Views and the Domains of Change depicts the model views for the domains of change frame d by model views that provide integration and coordination. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-5 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK ORGANIZATION BUSINESS PROCESS LOCATION SERVICE DATA TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION SYSTEM ENGINEERING BUSINESS dj981503c Catalyst Model Views and the Domains of Change Model views are the vehicle for transforming the needs for each domain of change into results. Each model view contains a set of models consisting of work products.
Each model represents a layer of the solution. For more information about models and work products refer to the Work Products in Catalyst section in this chapter. Units of Scope in Catalyst Units of scope help to scale and structure the service contract or engagement so that the following questions can be answered: ? What are the boundaries of the business organization being addressed? ? How will the work be structured to deliver the solution? ? How will the solution be structured and deployed to the organization? These questions define the three dimensions of scope —business, work, and solution.
CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-6 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Multi-Enterprise Enterprise Business Area Program System Services Subsystem Type of Service System Component Localized Service Project Product Service Work Package dj972803c Catalyst Units of Scope Units of scope express levels of magnitude. The figure Catalyst Units of Scope shows the units for each dimension of scope: ? Business scope scales from a multi-enterprise organization to an enterprise and a business area within an enterprise. ?
Work scope scales from a program to a project and a work package within a project. A project can deliver a product, a service, or a combination of the two. Examples of services are strategic consulting services, setting up and managing programs, and providing continuous operations. ? Solution scope is different for products and services. – Product solution scope scales from a system to a subsystem and a system component within a subsystem. – Service solution scope scales from an overall contract for services to a type of service specified in a contract and a localized service for a specific site and situation.
Determining units of scope plays an important part in service contract or engagement planning. It must be done for all three collectively to help ensure that all parts of the service contract or engagement work together at the appropriate level to deliver the intended outcome, which is typically one or more releases or service level agreements. For more information about release planning refer to Catalyst Program Management, Catalyst Project Management, and Catalyst Maintenance Processes. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation.
CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-7 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Business Scope in Catalyst Business scope describes the scale of the business organization being addressed. Business scope levels are defined as follows: ? A multi-enterprise organization consists of multiple enterprises operating together in a value-added alliance. For example, an aerospace initiative involves government agencies and major contractors, and an international civil engineering project such as the Channel Tunnel involves government agencies in multiple countries. An enterprise is a major organization with its own mission, goals, and performance objectives. An enterprise may be an independent company, a major division of a large company, a corporation, or a government agency. The typical enterprise includes a number of business areas. ? A business area is any logical subset of the enterprise singled out for solution or service delivery. A business area can be defined as a function of the enterprise; however, cross functional business areas generally provide the opportunity for more effective solutions.
Examples of cross-functional business areas include product development, order fulfillment, customer service, and finance administration and reporting. A business area contains one or more physical locations or sites. Work Scope in Catalyst Work scope describes the structure and scale of the work to be performed. Work scope levels are defined as follows: ? A program is the set of activities and decisions concerning the delivery of any collection of projects, services, and other activities managed together for a specified purpose.
A pro gram consists of one or more projects. ? A project is a temporary endeavor that consists of a managed set of activities undertaken to create a product, deliver a service, or achieve a business result and to meet specific objectives and completion criteria within specific time, cost, resource, and quality constraints. A project can be composed of multiple work packages. ? A work package is a major unit of work performed on a project. It has a well -defined scope, a schedule, and a time-phased staffing profile. Solution Scope in Catalyst
Solution scope describes the scale of the elements that will be used to design, build, integrate, and deploy a solution. Product solutions have these solution scope levels: ? A system is the integrated solution that supports a set of defined objectives for a customer. ? A subsystem is a collection of related solution components grouped to accomplish one or more parts of the system’s objective. ? A system component is an element of the solution that can be independently developed to address a specific aspect of the solution and integrated with other system components to form a subsystem.
Service solutions have these solution scope levels: ? The entire body of services is specified in the service contract. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-8 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK ? A type of service supports a set of defined objectives for a customer, such as network services, desktop and distributed systems, mainframe and midrange operations, or employee payroll. ? A localized service supports a specific function at one or more specific sites, but is not applicable to other sites within the service contract.
For example, one division of a company may require a separate compensation and reward program that will continue to run on a legacy system. Using Units of Scope Multiple Levels for Each Dimension of Scope A service contract or engagement can be structured to address multiple levels for each dimension of scope. These levels can relate differently at different points of the service contract or engagement. For example, a project may focus on analyzing a single business a rea for a system that will ultimately be deployed to multiple business areas or sites.
The solution may be decomposed into subsystems and system components for design, development, and testing. These efforts may, in turn, require work packages that address smaller pieces of the solution. Interactions Among Dimensions of Scope The dimensions of scope work in combination to support various processes. The following examples show how units of scope may be used for some typical processes. PROBLEM DEFINITION Together, business scope and work scope can help determine the scale and type of work needed to address each level of the business.
As solution design begins, the levels of the organization that require a vision are mapped to the appropriate levels of work. Fo r example, a project may be needed to define an enterprise vision, or multiple projects may be needed to define an architecture for each business area. SOLUTION DEVELOPMENT Together, work scope and solution scope can help determine the scale of work requir ed to evolve from design through development to operation or to provide outsourcing services. They also support the effort of planning and organizing work into releases or segments of service to be provided.
For example, a project may have a release that i ncludes development work packages that are targeted for a larger, logical unit of business scope, such as a business area, but that are deployed at physical locations or sites. If the work to be done crosses many organizational boundaries, a program might be considered. If the work will be limited to one area of the business, a project may be more appropriate. SOLUTION DEPLOYMENT Together, solution scope and business scope can help determine what levels of the organization will need to be targeted at different stages of the life cycle. This is especially important for deployment.
For example, a solution defined for a particular business area may be developed in separate work packages or service requests that are defined in terms of logical boundaries. However, integration and deployment will occur at physical sites and at locations on those sites within the business area. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-9 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK The Catalyst Box of Boxes LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT Service Management Operational Services Enterprise & Portfolio Management Deployment Program Management Integration
Project Management Development Architecture & Engineering Mgmt Architecture Management Support Processes Vision & Strategy Catalyst Box of Boxes The Box of Boxes is the highest-level framing concept for the work of a Catalyst service contract or engagement. As shown in the figure Catalyst Box of Boxes, it contains a life-cycle portion and a management portion. The life-cycle portion of the Box of Boxes represents the work to be done; the management portion represents coordination and integration of that work. The life cycle is represented by phases, which categorize and sequence the work to be done.
Management is represented by management areas, which categorize specific types of coordination. The complete set of phases and management areas is a generic template for delivering solutions. It is rare for an engagement to use all of the phases and management areas in the template, but they are all available when needed. Phases and Management Areas Phases represent the inherent life cycle for delivering solutions. The phases selected for a service contract or engagement are life-cycle segments that collectively describe and order the work to be done.
A management area is a set of processes used to describe and order the control and coordination aspects of a service contract or engagement. With phases, management areas provide a basis for planning, estimating, and facilitating the coordination and integration of work across the service contract or engagement. Each service contract or engagement starts with a ? footprint? in the Box of Boxes: the set of phases and management areas that will be applied. The initial determination of domains of change impacts and units of scope helps guide the selection of phases and management areas forming this footprint.
Within the selected phases and management areas, the Catalyst practitioner selects from alternative and optional processes and adapts the resulting set of processes to suit the service contract or engagement. The footprint may be adjusted as the service contract or engagement proceeds. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-10 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK While domains of change focus on the breadth of the business need or problem, phases focus on the structure and depth of the effort.
Each phase contains groups of processes applicable to that point in the life cycle. Using phases to identify and position an engagement within the life cycle helps the Catalyst practitioner anticipate what needs to come before and what should follow. Phases should be viewed as helpful conventions, not as f irm rules for defining the boundaries of the service contract or engagement. Life-Cycle Phases in Catalyst Vision and Strategy The Vision and Strategy phase is the starting point for enabling wide -reaching change. It addresses change from a broad perspective that narrows to focus on critical areas of the business.
During this phase areas of change are identified, including key business processes and a vision for the products or services the customer organization wants to deliver. The Vision and Strategy phase uses existing business objectives, best practice, and customer input to establish performance goals, a vision, and a set of principles in each domain of change. These goals drive planning and alignment for specific areas of the business. The Vision and Strategy phase results in an organization positioned for change and defines one or more engagements to be pursued.
For more information refer to Catalyst Vision and Strategy. Architecture The Architecture phase decomposes specific areas of the customer org anization targeted for change. The phase defines the overall business solution, in terms of integrated high -level components, in sufficient detail for development work to begin. In addition, the architecture is developed with the eventual operational servi ce in mind, to ensure that the operational performance goals and expectations are met and to meet agreed -upon full life-cycle cost targets.
For each targeted area, the Architecture phase reviews and updates the goals, vision, and performance targets in light of the overall vision and strategy. It then defines requirements of the business to affect all domains of change. A high -level design is created—using tools and techniques such as process modeling, conceptual data modeling, application architecture, and technical infrastructure design—along with updated organizational roles and location types. Approaches are selected based on the type of change required, using small conceptual prototypes where necessary.
Other key results of the Architecture phase include the identification of potential application software packages, a defined business case, and a plan that divides the overall solution into manageable releases. For more information refer to Catalyst Business Area Architecture, Catalyst System Architecture , and Catalyst Enterprise Architecture. Development The Development phase decomposes the architecture definition into detailed specifications and builds the solution by creating or acquiring release components. The Development phase approach is determined by the path or paths selected.
Customer requirements and the technical CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-11 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK nature of the solution determine the path. For more information refer to the Paths in Catalyst section in this chapter. Integration The Integration phase addresses components of a relea se. During this phase the integration team brings together individual work packages of solution components developed or acquired separately during the Development phase.
Application and technical infrastructure components are tested to verify that they interact properly. If appropriate, the team conducts a pilot to ensure that all elements of the business solution work together, including business processes, organization support systems, information technology, and facilities representative of the target bu siness operation. Other processes in the Integration phase include conducting a pilot of systems management processes, such as Help Desk response, and testing system performance through a realistic simulation of peak volumes.
For more information refer to Catalyst Integration and Deployment. Deployment During the Deployment phase, the team puts the solution release into operation at target sites. The release may consist of new business processes, applications, and supporting infrastructure and organizational changes. Deployment phase processes are repeated for each deployment site. Deployment processes include ordering, installing, integrating, and testing application and technical infrastructure components for the deployment site.
Examples include completin g appropriate organization change interventions, training deployment site personnel, conducting a communications campaign, and beginning business operations under the new concept. For more information refer to Catalyst Integration and Deployment. Operational Services The Operational Services phase addresses all the day-to-day operations and support processes necessary to deliver continuous service: ? Continuous Service Delivery—Scheduled operation, monitoring, and maintenance activities ?
Service Request Delivery—Non-scheduled activities in response to problem reports, change requests, and requests for additional service ? Support processes—Asset Management, Technology Administration, Security Administration, and Facilities Administration activities required to ke ep the system up and running at the contractually specified level. For more information refer to Catalyst Continuous Services. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-12 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Catalyst Phase Summary
Phase Purpose Vision and Strategy • Establish business objectives • Create future vision • Define and prioritize business areas Architecture • • • • Development • Complete detailed design • Build, transform, or acquire applications and infrastructure to support processes Integration • Validate entire business solution, optionally using authentic pilot Deployment • Deploy all aspects of business solution to target locations Operational Services • Continuously operate and improve computing environment Define requirements for affected domains of change
Describe and design major processes Create structure to guide development Plan releases Management Areas in Catalyst Enterprise and Portfolio Management Enterprise and Portfolio Management comprises the processes for Enterprise Management (setting the business direction, monitoring achievement against goals, and making adjustments as necessary), Account Management (effective management of an outsourcing relationship), and Portfolio Management (assessing and directing a portfolio of assets or offerings in order to balance benefits, costs, and risks in a strategic context).
Program Management Program Management is the set of actions and decisions that direct and coordinate initiatives within a program. Program Management includes activities such as selecting projects to pursue and support, monitoring and responding to changes in the b usiness environment, and resolving interproject issues. Managing programs involves directing, assuring, and coordinating activities and decisions that enable an enterprise to achieve needed business results by business -critical dates. For more information refer to Catalyst Program Management. Project Management
Project Management is a disciplined process for identifying, coordinating, and continuously focusing people and other resources to achieve project and contractual objectives within time, cost, resource, and quality constraints. The Project Manager is the person whom management identifies as responsible and accountable for achieving project and contractual objectives within the specified constraints. The project manager plans, directs, controls, and r eports on the project. For more information refer to Catalyst Project Management. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation.
CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-13 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Service Management Service Management processes guide and govern the Operational Services phase of the life cycle. Service Management has two main components: ? Service Request Management receives and then manages fulfillment of requests. Service Request Management includes logging, performing initial analysis, monitoring, prioritizing, measuring, and closing. As the single point of entry and as the central point, the Help Desk interfaces with all other functional areas and with the escalation/notification processes. Service Delivery Management coordinates and manages services to ensure that the customer receives a seamless delivery of service. Service Delivery Management includ es processes such as Service Level Agreement Management, Client Management, Site Management, and Service Delivery Assurance. For more information refer to the Continuous Services Overview. Architecture and Engineering Management Architecture and Engineering Management processes focus on the architecture of solutions.
They include processes associated with formulating and coordinating solutions, continued maintenance of defined architectures and actual business and technical environments, and managing and coordinating change in development and operational environments. For more information refer to Catalyst Architecture and Engineering Management. Management Support Processes Management Support Processes consists of the management processes and supporting techniques needed to support the other Catalyst management processes. It includes the organizational and process infrastructure needed to make and implement effective management decisions.
Many of the techniques are common to managing projects, programs, and operations and would be expected to be in place as part of the management environment. Catalyst suggests techniques to use and provides advice on the processes required to accomplish initiatives effectively. For more information refer to Catalyst Management Support Processes. Process Enablement Paths in Catalyst A process enablement path is a set of processes with a specialized focus, reflecting a technical approach or type of business solution, in support of customer requirements. Process enablement paths can span multiple phases.
The figure Examples of How Process Enablement Paths Fit Into the Life Cycle illustrates how some typical paths map to phases. Process enablement path selection is a significant factor in planning project structure. When planning a service contract or engagement that involves solution development, the Catalyst practitioner selects the path or paths most suited to project objectives. Examples of process enablement paths are: ? Accelerated Application Development (XAD), useful for highly critical, rapid application development when component- or Web-based development is not appropriate. ?
Catalyst Enterprise Resource Planning (C-ERP), appropriate for engagements that need to implement ERP packages, such as SAP, Oracle, and PeopleSoft. It provides a reusable CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-14 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK process framework that unites CSC ERP best practices and ERP methodologies in a common overall approach. ? Catalyst Rational Unified Process (C-RUP), appropriate for engagements requiring RUP. It provides a framework that integrates RUP into Catalyst’s business change and management processes. Catalyst Data Warehousing (CDW), appropriate for Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing solutions. ? Iterative Custom Development (ICD), appropriate for developing a custom solution using iterative techniques. ? Incremental Application Development (IAD), appropriate for developing a solution involving business process design, application development, or data definition and design, in a scenario involving large, complex, or non -interactive applications with requirements defined early in the life cycle. ? Legacy Systems Transformation (LST), appropriate for the improvement of the usiness value of an existing system or systems through changes to or replacement of the system components or infrastructure. The transformation affects one or more of the technical domains (application, data, and technology). ? Package-Based Development (PBD), appropriate for evaluating, selecting, and implementing a package-based solution. ? Release-Based Maintenance (RBM), appropriate for discrete projects addressing the routine maintenance and evolution of existing systems. Examples of How Process Enablement Paths Fit Into the Life Cycle The bars superimposed on the Box of Boxes represent the activities specific to each path.
The figure illustrates where they are executed relative to the activities for phases. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-15 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Processes in Catalyst A process is an ordered, interdependent set of activities that accomplishes a specific purpose. Processes can be executed independently or combined with other processes to form larger processes. Processes can be tailored by adding, deleting, changing, reordering, and scaling activities. For more information about activities refer to the Activities in Catalyst section in this chapter.
Subphases and specialty areas are Catalyst framework processes. They are selected after phases, management areas, and paths are identified. Like other processes, subphases and specialty areas can be tailored specifically for the service contract or engagement. A subphase is a process that addresses a specific purpose within a life-cycle phase, management area, or specialty area. For example, Information Technology Strategy (ITS) is a subphase of the Vision and Strategy phase. The objective of ITS is to position the use of information and information technology to support the future direction of the business.
For more information refer to Catalyst Information Technology Strategy. A specialty area is a process or group of processes that provides or adds specialized focus for a domain of change and supports a specific set of role competencies. A specialty area may cross several phases. For example, Organizational Change (OC) is a disciplined process for defining the future organizational characteristics required to enable intended business results and for supporting stakeholders in their transition to, and realization of, the desired organizational future state.
For more information refer to Catalyst Organizational Change. Process Flow Diagrams are graphical representations of processes. For an example see the figure Process Flow Diagram for Business Area Architecture. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-16 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Process Flow Diagram for Business Area Architecture CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-17 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Activities in Catalyst
An activity is a unit of work involving one or more roles to produce a tangible or intangible result. Activities may contain lower-level activities or tasks. Work Products in Catalyst A work product is a tangible result (output) of an activity or task. Work products can be components embodying the solution at successive stages from design to operation, or they can be used to help manage, support, and facilitate solution definition, evolution, and operation. Work Products and Deliverables Work products are not always deliverables. A deliverable is a work product or service given to the client for review and acceptance.
It frequently has co ntractual implications. Catalyst work products are grouped into the following categories: ? Model Views. A model view is a collection of models pertaining to a particular domain. Catalyst provides a model view for each of the six domains of change (busine ss process, organization, location, application, data, and technology). Additional model views are provided, such as the business model view and the system engineering model view. For more information refer to Model Views in Catalyst in the Catalyst Framin g Concepts section of this chapter. ? Plans.
These work products define, manage, and organize service contracts or engagements or specified parts of service contracts or engagements. ? Reports. These work products represent point-in-time summaries of the contents of one or more model views. ? Management Work Products. These work products are used for planning, guiding the service contract or engagement, communicating with the team, and analyzing and reporting overall status. ? Development Results. These work products include the solutions deployed at various sites in an integrated release as well as certain intermediate stages of those solutions, such as prototypes.
The table Catalyst Work Product Categories lists examples of the subcategories in each major category of work products. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-18 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Catalyst Work Product Categories Category Subcategories Model Views • • • • • • • • Business Model View System Engineering Model View Business Process Model View Organization Model View Location Model View Application Model View Data Model View Technology Model View Plans • • • • • Transformation Plans
Program Management Plan Project Management Plan Test Plans and Materials Other Plans Reports • Life-Cycle Reports • Other Reports Management Work Products • • • • • • • • • • Development Results • Prototypes • Development Products • Integrated Products Configuration Management Work Products Staff Management Work Products Quality Management Work Products Risk Management Work Products Issue Management Work Products Monitoring and Tracking Work Products Project Results Work Products Project Management File Program Management Work Products Procurement Work Products
For detailed information about work products refer to Catalyst Work Products. Work Product Models In Catalyst, the solution design resides in and evolves through an interrelated set of models. Models provide meaningful categories for understanding the components required to develop the solution and ensuring that the solution is properly integrated across all affected domains of change. Models ensure that the solution will be: ? Organized, grouped, and leveled based on logical relationships. ? Comprehensive, containing the selected set of work products at each stage of development and for each model view. Integrated, demonstrating continuity and integration of the solution design across all model views as work products evolve from abstract to concrete. CSC CatalystSM Overview ©2009 by Computer Sciences Corporation. CSC Proprietary. All rights reserved. 2009-10-30 3-19 THE CATALYST FRAMEWORK Each Catalyst model is a collection of related work products, and each model view is a collection of related models. The figure Model Views, Models, and Work Products illustrates these relationships. Model View s Models Work Products dj982701c Model Views, Models, and Work Products
As the solution design evolves, work products are created, updated, and integrated. Within each domain and across domains, models capture and reflect the solution design at predefined points of the life cycle. When the model detail is complete, the set of models describes the new state of the solution. The Model Views and Models table lists examples of the models contained in each model view. Model Views and Models Model View Models Business Model View Direction, Diagnostic System Engineering Model View Direction, Diagnostic, Conceptual, Logical Business Process Model View

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