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Employee Job Satisfaction at Sail Essays

Executive Summary: Job Satisfaction has been defined as a pleasurable emotional state resulting from the appraisal of ones job; an affective reaction to one’s job and an attitude towards one’s job. The main objective of this project is to assess the satisfaction level of employees in Bhilai Steel Plant . Job Satisfaction describes how content an individual is with his or her job. it is a relatively recent term since in previous centuries the jobs available to a particular person were often predetermined by the occupation of that person’s parent.
The main objective of this project is to identify the factors which influence the job satisfaction of employees. There are a variety of factors that can influence a person’s level of job satisfaction. Some of these factors include the level of pay and benefits, the perceived fairness or the promotion system within a company, the quality of the working conditions, leadership and social relationships, the job itself (the variety of tasks involved, the interest and challenge the job generates, and the clarity of the job description/requirements).
To identify the factors which improves the satisfaction level of employees. To know the employee satisfaction towards the facilities. This report discusses the details of analysis of data related to Job Satisfaction. Contents CHAPTER NOCONTENTSPAGE NO IINDUSTRY ANALYSIS 1. 1 Global Steel Scenario & Indian Steel Industry 1. 2 Steel Demand in India 1. 3 Porter’s five Forces Analysis of the Steel Industry and Firm level Capabilities Analysis8-1 IICOMPANY ANALYSIS 2. 1 SAIL –an overview 2. 2 Basic concept of industrial marketing at SAIL 2. 3 Customers of SAIL 2. Organization Structure of SAIL 2. 5 Human Resource 2. 6 Finance 2. 7 SWOT Analysis of the Industry16-28 IIIDISCUSSION ON TRAINING 3. 1 Roles and Responsibilities29 IVANALYSIS OF RESEARCH UNDERTAKEN 4. 1 Introduction and background 4. 2 Reason for choosing the topic 4. 3 Benefits from the Research 4. 4 Statement of the problem 4. 5 Objective of research 4. 6 Scope of the study 4. 7 Methodology of the study 4. 9 Findings 4. 10 Analysis 4. 11 Conclusion 4. 12 Suggestion30-31 Bibliography Annexure CHAPTER 1 INDUSTRY ANALYSIS 1. 1 GLOBAL STEEL SCENARIO& INDIAN STEEL INDUSTRY:
Introduction: Though Iron and steel have been used by men for almost 6000 years, yet the modern form of iron and steel industry came into being only during the 19th century. The growth and development of iron and steel industry in the world until the second World War was comparatively slower. But the industry has grown very rapidly after the Second World War. World Production of steel, which was only 28. 3 million tonnes (MT) in 1900, rose to 695 MT by 1992. The oil crisis of the seventies affected the entire economy of the world including the steel industry.
The position started improving after 1983 and peaked at 780 MT in 1989. World Steel production was around 1220 MT in 2009. Historical Background: There are evidences that man knew the use of Iron since the ancient civilization of Babylon, Mexico, Egypt, China, India, Greece and Rome. Archaeological findings in Mesopotamia and Egypt have proved that iron or steel has been in the service of mankind for nearly 6000 years. The origin of the methods used by early man for extracting iron from ores is unknown.
In early days the product probably was so relatively soft and unpredictable, that bronze continued to be preferred for many tools and weapons. Eventually iron replaced the nonferrous metal for these purposes when man learned how to master the difficult arts of smelting, forging, hardening, and tempering iron. Iron kept its dominant place for 200 or more years after the Saugas works that was the first successful Iron Works in America founded in 1646. With the advance of Industrial Revolution, iron formed the rails for the newly invented railroads trains.
It was also used to armour the sides of the fighting ships. About the mid-19th century the new age of steel began with the invention of Bessemer process (1856) making steel available in large quantities of reasonable cost. Indian History: Indian history is also replete with references to the usage of iron and steel. Some of the ancient monuments like the famous iron pillar near New Delhi or the massive beams used in the Sun Temple at Konark bear ample testimony to the technological excellence of the Indian metallurgists.
The history of iron in India goes back to the ancient era. Our ancient literary sources like Rig Veda, the Atharva Veda, the Puranas and other Epics are full of references to iron and to its uses in peace and war. According to one of the studies, iron has been produced in India for over 3000 years, in primitive, small scale facilities. Global Scenario: International steel sector is reflecting the global trends in business environment. The early years of the 21st century have set the pattern for the future.
Asia has increased its share of production. Although consumption of steel is likely to increase in most regions of the world in the medium term, growth in industrialized nations is likely to be much slower than the average growth in demand across the world. Developing countries and the emerging countries are likely to have the fastest rate of growth in steel demand in the future. In the developed world, the EU is expected to experience stagnant demand in the medium term, while the NAFTA block is likely to see low positive growth in consumption.
In Japan, demand for steel has steadily declined in recent years due to restrictions on Government spending in construction projects as well as weak consumer demand, A modest growth is anticipated in the manufacturing and building sectors as the economic performance improves. However, the medium term projection is for a reduction in overall steel consumption in Japan. Amoungst the developing economies, China requires special mention. China’s apparent consumption of finished steel during 1996 was 97 million tonnes, which amounted to around 15% of world finished steel consumption.
However, by the year 2007, China’s consumption figure reached a staggering 310 million tonnes, accounting for around 30% of the total world finished steel consumption. China’s steel consumption is still growing at a fast pace and as per IISI estimates steel production of China during 2009-10 was 565 million tonnes which are 38% of the total steel production of the world. Finished steel consumption in the world has crossed a billion tonnes in 2005. However, despite the growth in consumption there are apprehensions of excess production as compared to global demand.
As per the estimates by the WSD, world finished steel production, which stands today at more than 1 billion tonnes a year, is expected to cross 1. 5 billion tonnes by 2012. As the trend in the world is towards producing low cost steel by using more environmental friendly means, steel producers worldwide are adopting new technologies like Corex and Compact Strip Casting, adopting alternate routes like Electric Arc Furnace instead of the traditional Blast Furnace-Basic Oxygen Furnace route, as well as importing raw materials like coke. Growth of Indian Steel Sector:
India is amoungst the cheapest producers of hot metal in the world. The cost advantage mainly arises from the abundant availability of cheap and good quality iron ore. Besides, overall manpower cost is also low. However these advantages are nullified to some extent due to low labour productivity, high energy and power costs and high finance charges. The expansion plans of steel majors are likely to put tremendous pressure on the availability of inputs and infrastructure resources within the country. The nation is endowed with large iron ore reserves, but their development and exploitation would require huge resources.
Besides, the effects on the environment where virgin areas are being exploited needs to be addressed, Availability of cooking coal is expected to remain a serious constraint. Cooking coal supplies from public sector coal companies have been declining over the years, leading to higher imports. Traditional cooking coal and coke suppliers such as China have also curtailed exports in order to feed their expanding iron &steel industry. The steel industry needs to remain competitive by improving efficiency across the entire value chain in an integrated manner.
Hence, logistics would be an important area of concern for the steel industry. This involves development of ports, smoother transportation to and from ports, rationalization of inland freight charges as well as better road movement facilities. During the early 90s, the Sponge Iron industry was especially promoted to provide an alternative material to steel melting scrap, which at that time was increasingly becoming scarce. Since then India has emerged as one of the largest producers of Sponge Iron. This provides good opportunities to steel industry as a substitute of scrap.
Considering the entire power supply position in the country as well as high power the most suitable steel making technology for India would be the integrated route. Industry Structure The iron and steel industry in India is organized in three categories’ viz. main producers, other major producers and the secondary producers. The main producers and other major producers have integrated steel making facility with plant capacities over 0. 5 MT and utilize iron ore and coal/gas for production of steel. In 2004-2005, the main producers i. e.
SAIL, TISCO and RINL had a combined capacity of around 19. 3 MT and capacity utilization was 104 percent. The other major producers comprising of ESSAR, ISPAT AND JSW had a capacity of 6. 4 MT with capacity utilization of 97 percent. The secondary sector includes sponge iron producers, mini blast furnaces, electric arc furnaces, rerollers etc. this sector has a production capacity of 32. 7 MT in 2004-05. Outlook for Indian Economy After witnessing rapid strides during the years after the liberalization process was set in motion, India’s GDP grew at an average rate of 5. % during the period 1998-99 to 2002-03. However, there was a break from the trend in 2003-04, during which the economy is estimated to have grown at more than 8%. Baring the recent slowdown due to global meltdown, economy is expected to continue on a high growth path with continued macroeconomic stability. Over the years there has been a downward trend in interest rates accompanied by moderate inflation and adequate liquidity in the economy. Infrastructure development has been a focus area for the Government in recent years.
In the road and highway network, India is witnessing development of multiple-lane, safe and well designed interstate highways. Recently the Government has announced a planned outlay for the rural road and highway network development. The Golden Quadrilateral Project is an ambitious project that would connect the four major metros via state of the art highways. The East-West and North-South corridors would link up the remotest parts of the country. The government is also planning to facilitate investments in sea-ports and airports in a major way. Concessions in the form of tax rebates etc. o boost investment in the housing sector, as well as falling interest rates have made available cheap home finance loans and have given a thrust to the housing sector. A rise in depreciation rates for vehicles, excise duty reduction and low interest rates has given a major boost to the automobile sector. From a negative production growth rate of 2% during 2000-01, the automobile sector has recorded a growth of 18% during 2002-03 and 15% during 2003-04. The capital Goods sector which had shown a declining trend from the year 1998-99, came back strongly during 2002-03, growing at the rate of 10. %. the strong growth of the capital good sector has continued since 2003-04. given the strong fundamentals and stability in key macro economic aggregates, the average GDP growth during the year 2004-05 to 2007-08 is about 8%. GDP growth during 2009-10 was about 6. 7%. Executive Summary: Job Satisfaction has been defined as a pleasurable emotional state resulting from the appraisal of ones job; an affective reaction to one’s job and an attitude towards one’s job. The main objective of this project is to assess the satisfaction level of employees in Bhilai Steel Plant .
Job Satisfaction describes how content an individual is with his or her job. it is a relatively recent term since in previous centuries the jobs available to a particular person were often predetermined by the occupation of that person’s parent. The main objective of this project is to identify the factors which influence the job satisfaction of employees. There are a variety of factors that can influence a person’s level of job satisfaction. Some of these factors include the level of pay and benefits, the perceived airness or the promotion system within a company, the quality of the working conditions, leadership and social relationships, the job itself (the variety of tasks involved, the interest and challenge the job generates, and the clarity of the job description/requirements). To identify the factors which improves the satisfaction level of employees. To know the employee satisfaction towards the facilities. This report discusses the details of analysis of data related to Job Satisfaction. Contents CHAPTER NOCONTENTSPAGE NO IINDUSTRY ANALYSIS 1. Global Steel Scenario & Indian Steel Industry 1. 2 Steel Demand in India 1. 3 Porter’s five Forces Analysis of the Steel Industry and Firm level Capabilities Analysis8-1 IICOMPANY ANALYSIS 2. 1 SAIL –an overview 2. 2 Basic concept of industrial marketing at SAIL 2. 3 Customers of SAIL 2. 4 Organization Structure of SAIL 2. 5 Human Resource 2. 6 Finance 2. 7 SWOT Analysis of the Industry16-28 IIIDISCUSSION ON TRAINING 3. 1 Roles and Responsibilities29 IVANALYSIS OF RESEARCH UNDERTAKEN 4. 1 Introduction and background 4. 2 Reason for choosing the topic 4. 3 Benefits from the Research . 4 Statement of the problem 4. 5 Objective of research 4. 6 Scope of the study 4. 7 Methodology of the study 4. 9 Findings 4. 10 Analysis 4. 11 Conclusion 4. 12 Suggestion30-31 Bibliography Annexure CHAPTER 1 INDUSTRY ANALYSIS 1. 1 GLOBAL STEEL SCENARIO& INDIAN STEEL INDUSTRY: Introduction: Though Iron and steel have been used by men for almost 6000 years, yet the modern form of iron and steel industry came into being only during the 19th century. The growth and development of iron and steel industry in the world until the second World War was comparatively slower.
But the industry has grown very rapidly after the Second World War. World Production of steel, which was only 28. 3 million tonnes (MT) in 1900, rose to 695 MT by 1992. The oil crisis of the seventies affected the entire economy of the world including the steel industry. The position started improving after 1983 and peaked at 780 MT in 1989. World Steel production was around 1220 MT in 2009. Historical Background: There are evidences that man knew the use of Iron since the ancient civilization of Babylon, Mexico, Egypt, China, India, Greece and Rome.
Archaeological findings in Mesopotamia and Egypt have proved that iron or steel has been in the service of mankind for nearly 6000 years. The origin of the methods used by early man for extracting iron from ores is unknown. In early days the product probably was so relatively soft and unpredictable, that bronze continued to be preferred for many tools and weapons. Eventually iron replaced the nonferrous metal for these purposes when man learned how to master the difficult arts of smelting, forging, hardening, and tempering iron.
Iron kept its dominant place for 200 or more years after the Saugas works that was the first successful Iron Works in America founded in 1646. With the advance of Industrial Revolution, iron formed the rails for the newly invented railroads trains. It was also used to armour the sides of the fighting ships. About the mid-19th century the new age of steel began with the invention of Bessemer process (1856) making steel available in large quantities of reasonable cost. Indian History: Indian history is also replete with references to the usage of iron and steel.
Some of the ancient monuments like the famous iron pillar near New Delhi or the massive beams used in the Sun Temple at Konark bear ample testimony to the technological excellence of the Indian metallurgists. The history of iron in India goes back to the ancient era. Our ancient literary sources like Rig Veda, the Atharva Veda, the Puranas and other Epics are full of references to iron and to its uses in peace and war. According to one of the studies, iron has been produced in India for over 3000 years, in primitive, small scale facilities. Global Scenario: International steel sector is reflecting the global trends in business environment.
The early years of the 21st century have set the pattern for the future. Asia has increased its share of production. Although consumption of steel is likely to increase in most regions of the world in the medium term, growth in industrialized nations is likely to be much slower than the average growth in demand across the world. Developing countries and the emerging countries are likely to have the fastest rate of growth in steel demand in the future. In the developed world, the EU is expected to experience stagnant demand in the medium term, while the NAFTA block is likely to see low positive growth in consumption.
In Japan, demand for steel has steadily declined in recent years due to restrictions on Government spending in construction projects as well as weak consumer demand, A modest growth is anticipated in the manufacturing and building sectors as the economic performance improves. However, the medium term projection is for a reduction in overall steel consumption in Japan. Amoungst the developing economies, China requires special mention. China’s apparent consumption of finished steel during 1996 was 97 million tonnes, which amounted to around 15% of world finished steel consumption.
However, by the year 2007, China’s consumption figure reached a staggering 310 million tonnes, accounting for around 30% of the total world finished steel consumption. China’s steel consumption is still growing at a fast pace and as per IISI estimates steel production of China during 2009-10 was 565 million tonnes which are 38% of the total steel production of the world. Finished steel consumption in the world has crossed a billion tonnes in 2005. However, despite the growth in consumption there are apprehensions of excess production as compared to global demand.
As per the estimates by the WSD, world finished steel production, which stands today at more than 1 billion tonnes a year, is expected to cross 1. 5 billion tonnes by 2012. As the trend in the world is towards producing low cost steel by using more environmental friendly means, steel producers worldwide are adopting new technologies like Corex and Compact Strip Casting, adopting alternate routes like Electric Arc Furnace instead of the traditional Blast Furnace-Basic Oxygen Furnace route, as well as importing raw materials like coke. Growth of Indian Steel Sector:
India is amoungst the cheapest producers of hot metal in the world. The cost advantage mainly arises from the abundant availability of cheap and good quality iron ore. Besides, overall manpower cost is also low. However these advantages are nullified to some extent due to low labour productivity, high energy and power costs and high finance charges. The expansion plans of steel majors are likely to put tremendous pressure on the availability of inputs and infrastructure resources within the country. The nation is endowed with large iron ore reserves, but their development and exploitation would require huge resources.
Besides, the effects on the environment where virgin areas are being exploited needs to be addressed, Availability of cooking coal is expected to remain a serious constraint. Cooking coal supplies from public sector coal companies have been declining over the years, leading to higher imports. Traditional cooking coal and coke suppliers such as China have also curtailed exports in order to feed their expanding iron &steel industry. The steel industry needs to remain competitive by improving efficiency across the entire value chain in an integrated manner.
Hence, logistics would be an important area of concern for the steel industry. This involves development of ports, smoother transportation to and from ports, rationalization of inland freight charges as well as better road movement facilities. During the early 90s, the Sponge Iron industry was especially promoted to provide an alternative material to steel melting scrap, which at that time was increasingly becoming scarce. Since then India has emerged as one of the largest producers of Sponge Iron. This provides good opportunities to steel industry as a substitute of scrap.
Considering the entire power supply position in the country as well as high power the most suitable steel making technology for India would be the integrated route. Industry Structure The iron and steel industry in India is organized in three categories’ viz. main producers, other major producers and the secondary producers. The main producers and other major producers have integrated steel making facility with plant capacities over 0. 5 MT and utilize iron ore and coal/gas for production of steel. In 2004-2005, the main producers i. e. SAIL, TISCO and RINL had a combined capacity of around 19. 3 MT and capacity utilization was 104 percent.
The other major producers comprising of ESSAR, ISPAT AND JSW had a capacity of 6. 4 MT with capacity utilization of 97 percent. The secondary sector includes sponge iron producers, mini blast furnaces, electric arc furnaces, rerollers etc. this sector has a production capacity of 32. 7 MT in 2004-05. Outlook for Indian Economy After witnessing rapid strides during the years after the liberalization process was set in motion, India’s GDP grew at an average rate of 5. 2% during the period 1998-99 to 2002-03. However, there was a break from the trend in 2003-04, during which the economy is estimated to have grown at more than 8%.
Baring the recent slowdown due to global meltdown, economy is expected to continue on a high growth path with continued macroeconomic stability. Over the years there has been a downward trend in interest rates accompanied by moderate inflation and adequate liquidity in the economy. Infrastructure development has been a focus area for the Government in recent years. In the road and highway network, India is witnessing development of multiple-lane, safe and well designed interstate highways. Recently the Government has announced a planned outlay for the rural road and highway network development.
The Golden Quadrilateral Project is an ambitious project that would connect the four major metros via state of the art highways. The East-West and North-South corridors would link up the remotest parts of the country. The government is also planning to facilitate investments in sea-ports and airports in a major way. Concessions in the form of tax rebates etc. to boost investment in the housing sector, as well as falling interest rates have made available cheap home finance loans and have given a thrust to the housing sector. A rise in depreciation rates for vehicles, excise duty reduction and low interest rates has given a major oost to the automobile sector. From a negative production growth rate of 2% during 2000-01, the automobile sector has recorded a growth of 18% during 2002-03 and 15% during 2003-04. The capital Goods sector which had shown a declining trend from the year 1998-99, came back strongly during 2002-03, growing at the rate of 10. 6%. the strong growth of the capital good sector has continued since 2003-04. given the strong fundamentals and stability in key macro economic aggregates, the average GDP growth during the year 2004-05 to 2007-08 is about 8%. GDP growth during 2009-10 was about 6. 7%.

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