Looking for a good sample?

Let us find the best one for you! What is your topic?

Over 850,000 documents to help brainstorm your essay topic

Haven't found the Essay You Want?
GET YOUR CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE
For Only $13/page
5 views

Research Paper Essays

Literature Search

Keene, E., Hutton, N., Hall, B., & Rushton, C. (2010). Breavement debriefing sessions: an intervention to support health care professionals in managing their grief after the death of a patient. Pediatric Nursing, 36(), 185-189. Rack, J., Burleson, B., Bodie, G., Holmstrom, A., & Servaty-Seib, H. (2008). Bereaved adults’ evaluations of grief management messages: effects of message person centeredness, recipient individual differences, and contextual factors. Death Studies, 32(5), 399-427. Tubbs-Cooley, H., Santucci, G., Kang, T., Feinstein, J., Hexem, K., & Feudtner, C. (2011). Pediatric nurses’s individual and group assessments of palliative, end-of-life and bereavement care. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 14(5), 631-7. Background: Although pediatric nurses working in children’s hospitals often provide care to dying children, little is known about their palliative care beliefs and experiences as individuals or members of groups within the hospital. Objective: To describe pediatric nurses’ ratings of palliative care goals and problems, as individuals and members of clusters of nurses with similar views, and nurses’ degree of collaboration with an inpatient palliative care team across hospital units.
Method: A cross-sectional survey of nurses at a freestanding children’s hospital in 2005. Results: Nurses rated the most important goals as managing pain, maintaining the child’s quality of life and improving communication. Commonly cited problems were lack of opportunity to debrief after a patient’s death, uncertainty about the goals of care and the health care team’s reluctance to discuss hospice with family. Based on individual views about goals and problems, nurses clustered into 5 groups that differed in terms of the adamancy of their views and the scope of the goals and problems they considered important or significant.
The hospital unit was the most important factor in predicting nurses’ degree of collaboration with the palliative care team even after accounting for individual characteristics. Conclusions: Pediatric nurses broadly endorse both the important of palliative care goals and the presence of problems yet perceive the importance of these goals and problems differently. Further, they vary in their level of collaborative practice with a palliative care team in ways that should be accounted for when planning and implementing palliative care programs. References
Healy, S., & Tyrrell, M. (2013). Importance of debriefing following critical incidences. Emergency Nurse, 20(10), 32-37. Keene, E., Hutton, N., Hall, B., & Rushton, C. (2010). Breavement debriefing sessions: an intervention to support health care professionals in managing their grief after the death of a patient. Pediatric Nursing, 36(), 185-189. Kristensen, P., Weisaeth, L., & Heir, T. (2012). Bereavement and mental health after sudden and violent losses. Psychiatry Interpersonal & Biological Processes, 75(1), 76-97. Rack, J., Burleson, B., Bodie, G., Holmstrom, A., & Servaty-Seib, H. (2008). Bereaved adults’ evaluations of grief management messages: effects of message person centeredness, recipient individual differences, and contextual factors. Death Studies, 32(5), 399-427. Tubbs-Cooley, H., Santucci, G., Kang, T., Feinstein, J., Hexem, K., & Feudtner, C. (2011). Pediatric nurses’s individual and group assessments of palliative, end-of-life and bereavement care. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 14(5), 631-7.

Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample register now and get a free access to all papers, carefully proofread and edited by our experts.

Sign Up Login We can't stand spam as much as you do No, thanks. I prefer suffering on my own