Ancient Egypt Essay - Part 2

Ancient Egypt This unit is designed to allow students to explore concepts surrounding Ancient Egypt - Ancient Egypt Essay introduction. Students will explore culture, socio-political and science of Ancient Egypt through reading, writing, mathematic, science and artistic endeavors. The content areas are all represented and the order designed to build on previous lessons or background. By the completion of the unit, students will demonstrate their understandings through completing a project designing their own moment pyramid.

Our group choose our theme and worked together to design our unit, though each of us contributed by writing up the lesson plans, gathering up information and writing the essay and editing activities. Heather- Lesson Planning(2 lessons) Alicia- Lesson Planning and Editing Aaron- Lesson Planning and Essay Anthony- Lesson Planning(2 lessons) Amanda- Lesson Planning(2 lessons) Bethany- Essay Writing and Editing Resource 2: SIOP Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Subject: 6th Grade English Unit/Theme: Vocabulary/Ancient Egypt Standards: English Standards: 5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e. g. , personification) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words (e. g. , cause/effect, part/whole, item/category) to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e. g. , stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). (6. L. 5) 6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when onsidering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. (6. L. 6)” (Arizona Department of Education, Pg. 28, 2012) ELL Standards: “E-1: legibly writing numbers and letters independently and with directionality (top to bottom, left to right). E-2: using common spelling of high frequency words, word families and rhyming words. ” (ELL Standards, Pg. 8, n. d. ) Content Objective(s): All students will be able to spell the vocabulary words given to them correctly by the end of the lesson. All students will know the definitions of the vocabulary words given to the by the end of the lesson.

We will write a custom essay sample on
Ancient Egypt Essay
or any similar topic specifically for you
Do Not Waste
Your Time
SEND

By clicking "SEND", you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails.

More Essay Examples on Egypt Rubric

All students will be able to use the vocabulary words learned to help complete a crossword puzzle. Language Objective(s): All students will be able to read and recite the vocabulary words given to them by the end of the lesson. All students will be able to read the definitions and descriptions of the crossword puzzle clues after the lesson. Key VocabularyHieroglyphics, Papyrus, Pyramids, Scribe, Sarcophagus, Pharaoh, Mummy, Delta, Embalming, Canopic Jars| Supplementary MaterialsVocabulary Words SheetVocabulary TestVocabulary Crosswords Puzzle| SIOP Features|

Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| ?? Adaptation of content??? Links to background ?? Links to past learning?? Strategies incorporated| ???? Modeling?? Guided practice ?? Independent practice ? Comprehensible input| ??? Whole class ??? Small groups ??? Partners ?? Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| ??? Reading ?? Writing ? Speaking ?? Listening| ? Hands-on ?? Meaningful ?? Linked to objectives ?? Promotes engagement| ? Individual ? Group ? Written ???

Oral| Lesson Sequence:Building Background:Introduce the lesson by asking the students if they have any knowledge about Ancient Egypt. Give them the vocabulary words they are going to learn, and have share what they know about each one, and if they know what they mean. This will indicate how much knowledge the students’ have on Ancient Egypt, and the words we are about to go over. Introduction of Vocabulary Words:After introducing the Ancient Egypt vocabulary words to the students, and gaining and understanding of how much they know about them, introduce all of the vocabulary words to them individually.

Have the students get out a piece of paper, and write down the word as they go over it, as well as the definition. After introducing the word to them, they will then have to say the word, and spell it out loud. Go over the spelling of each word, how the word is pronounced, and the definition of each word thoroughly. This process will be the same for each vocabulary word that you go over until you are finished. Make sure the students understand the word, and the definition moving on. Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle:After introducing the Ancient Egypt vocabulary words to the students will have homework practice.

This will help them get ready for the crossword puzzle they will have to finish the next day, and ensure they will know the words for the vocabulary test the day after the crossword puzzle. For the crossword puzzle the student will be able to work by himself or herself, or with a partner if they want to. The students will be given a crossword puzzle that includes the Ancient Egypt vocabulary words they just learned. They will have to use the clues given, which will either be the definitions of the word, or other clues that will explain the vocabulary word.

When they know what the word is for the proper space, they will then have to put the word in the blanks, and make sure they spell the word correctly. If they are unable to spell the word correctly, their crossword puzzle will not be correct. They will not be able to use their notes during this time but the instructor should make themselves available to assist during this time. Vocabulary Test: After going over the vocabulary words, having them practice the spelling and definitions of the words, completing a crossword puzzle to help them learn the words even more, they will then be given a test to show their understanding of the words.

On a sheet of paper students will write down the word spoken by the instructor, spell it correctly, and give the correct definition for that word. Say each word out loud and students will write the correct information on their sheet of paper. | | Timeline of Ancient Egypt Date: Grade/Class/Subject: 6th grade Social Studies Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt Standards: AZ Standards; Concept 1: Research Skills for History: PO 3 Construct timelines of the historical era being studied. ELL Stage IV: Reading Standard 4: B-23: locating information in print and electronic reference sources for a specific purpose.

Writing Standard 5: LI-4: Paraphrasing information from a variety of sources. Content Objective(s): SWBAT use resources to research a topic, understand basic timeline of Ancient Egypt, be able to create own timeline through research. Language Objective(s): SWBAT translate and summarize what they read into basic fact points, present their project to the class. Key VocabularyB. C. /A. D. , century, dynasty, period, Pharaoh, hieroglyphic, papyrus, pyramid, mummification| Supplementary MaterialsExtra long paper to create timelines, access to Internet resources, resource books. | SIOP Features|

Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| _X Adaptation of content___ Links to background___ Links to past learning_X_ Strategies incorporated| _X_ Modeling_X_ Guided practice___ Independent practice_X_ Comprehensible input| ___ Whole class___ Small groups_X_ Partners___ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| _X_ Reading_X Writing_X_ Speaking _X_ Listening| _X_ Hands-on_X_ Meaningful_X_ Linked to objectives_X_ Promotes engagement| _X Individual_X_ Group_X_ Written_X_ Oral| Lesson Sequence:The lesson will be introduced through the online timeline from Children’s University.

Class will be introduced to key vocabulary through this and the subsequent class discussion. In partnered pairs, students will have access to different research resources (online resources are attached). They will use what they find to create timelines on Ancient Egypt that are focused on ruler history, writing, pyramid building, or mummification. Each timeline should have between 10 and 20 points. Students will be required to decorate the timeline. Assessment:Students will be individually assessed through their participation in class discussions, and assessed as a group with their partner with whom they created the timeline. * http://www. ancientegypt. co. uk/time/explore/main-time. html * * http://www. ancientegypt. co. uk/menu. html * * http://www. pbs. org/empires/egypt/index. html * * http://travel. nationalgeographic. com/travel/egypt/pyramids-at-giza/ * * Mapping Ancient Egypt Date: Grade/Class/Subject: 6th grade Social Studies Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt Standards: AZ Standards; Concept 1: Research Skills for History: PO 1. Construct charts, graphs and narratives using historical data. PO 2. Interpret historical data displayed in graphs, tables, and charts. Concept 2: Early Civilizations: PO 3.

Describe the importance of the following river valleys in the development of ancient civilizations: b. Nile – Egypt. ELL Stage IV: Reading Standard 5: B-28: interpreting information in functional documents (e. g. , maps) for a specific purpose. Writing Standard 5: B-1: summarizing event using topic sentences, main ideas, relevant facts, details, and concluding statements. Content Objective(s): SWBAT read and analyze maps, understand the importance the Nile River played in the development of Ancient Egypt. Language Objective(s): SWBAT hypothesize and articulate how civilizations grew based on their geography, climate, and natural resources.

Key VocabularyCompass rose, north, south, east, west, map key, cartographer, empire, territory, tributary| Supplementary MaterialsMap of ancient Egypt (attached), “The Gift of the Nile” reading, paper and coloring items. | SIOP Features| Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| ___ Adaptation of content___ Links to background_X_ Links to past learning_X_ Strategies incorporated| ___ Modeling_X Guided practice_X_ Independent practice_X_ Comprehensible input| _X_ Whole class_X Small groups___ Partners_X_ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| X_ Reading_X_ Writing_X_ Speaking _X_ Listening| _X Hands-on_X Meaningful_X_ Linked to objectives_X_ Promotes engagement| _X_ Individual___ Group_X_ Written_X Oral| Lesson Sequence:Students will begin by reading “The Gift of the Nile” aloud, one student at a time, together as a class. Using the map, the class will cover vocabulary of the map. Then they will discuss why certain landmarks exist where they do (why are cities and pyramids close to waterways? ) In groups with a following class discussion, they will answer: * What are the different elements one can find on a map? What important information could a map provide? * In what ways do maps affect our daily lives? * In what ways have maps changed over time? Using the necessary parts of a map (compass, map key), students will create maps of their own of either their bedroom, the classroom, or the school. Extension exercises: * Study other maps of the world throughout history. Compare and contrast the different maps and styles. What do the different maps tell you about when they were made and who created them? * Create a more extensive glossary of map terms by using different maps and globes. Define each word and add illustrations for each ord. Assessment:Students will be evaluated through participation in class discussions, thoughtful analysis of maps exercise, and their self-made map. | The Gift of the Nile Like a giant snake, the Nile River slithers through some of the driest desert land on earth to isolate a narrow green valley. The ancient Greeks called this land Egypt. For more than five thousand years, great and often mysterious civilizations have thrived along the banks of the Nile. About 450BC, a Greek historian named Herodotus called Egypt the “Gift of the Nile” because the Egyptian civilization depended on the resources of the great river.

Every spring, the snow in the mountains of East Africa melted, sending a torrent of water that overflowed the banks of the Nile and flooded the river valley. The rushing river picked up bits of soil and plant life called silt. As the flood receded, a strip of black soil emerged every year along the banks of the Nile. The silt was rich in nutrients, and it provided the people of Egypt with two or three crops every year. The Nile made it possible for the people of ancient Egypt to form the first nation in history because the Egyptian people were isolated from the rest of the world.

A nation may refer to a community of people who share a common language, culture, ethnic background or history. The land beyond the Nile River Valley is the Sahara Desert. A desert is land that receives less than ten inches of rain in a typical year. Since it is nearly impossible to grow much food in the desert, few people lived far from the banks of the Nile. Giant boulders blocked the Nile and formed a natural border at the southern Egyptian city of Aswan. The Nile flows into the vast Mediterranean Sea, which formed Egypt’s border to the north. Egypt’s isolation led to its unification.

People living along the banks of the Nile River spoke the same language and worshipped many of the same gods more than five thousand years ago. The Nile no longer overflows its banks because modern Egyptians built a huge dam in Aswan. The Aswan High Dam was completed in 1970. It holds back water in Lake Nasser during the spring, and provides a reliable flow of water for Egyptian farmers in the dry season. The people of Egypt are now able to convert the predictable flow of the Nile into electricity. When the Aswan High Dam was first completed, it provided electricity to more than alf of the villages along the Nile. The population of Egypt has grown since then, but the Aswan High Dam still contributes about fifteen percent of Egypt’s electricity. Unlike oil, the flowing water is renewable, which means that the river will not run out. Even today, the Nile River continues to provide for the Egyptian people. Resource: mrdowling. com Mummification Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Class/Subject: 6th Grade Science Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt Standards: S1C1 PO 1 Formulate questions based on observations that lead to the development of a hypothesis.

S1C1 PO 2 Select appropriate resources for background information related to a question for use in the design of a controlled investigation. S1C1 S1C2 PO 1 Demonstrate safe behavior and appropriate procedures in all science inquiry. S1C2 PO4 Perform measurement using appropriate scientific tools. S1C2 PO5 Keep a record of observations, notes, sketches, questions, and ideas using tools such as written and/or computer logs. S1C3 PO1 Analyze data obtained in a scientific investigation to identify trends. S1C3 PO4 Determine validity and reliability of results of an investigation. S1C3 PO5 Formulate a conclusion based on data analysis.

S1C3 PO7 Formulate new questions based on the results of a previous investigation. S1C4 PO2 Display data collected from a controlled investigation. S1C4 PO3 Communicate the results of an investigation with appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative information. S1C4 PO5 Communicate the results and conclusion of the investigation. S2C1 PO1 Identify how diverse people and/or cultures, past and present, have made important contributions to scientific innovations. ELL-SIV-L&S-S1-4. ELL-SIV-L&S-S1-6. ELL-SIV-L&S-S1-7. ELL-SIV-L&S-S1-8. ELL-SIV-L&S-S2-6. ELL-SIV-R-S2-7. ELL-SIV-W-S1-3.

ELL-SIV-W-S1-4. ELL-SIV-W-S1-5. Content Objective(s): Students will be able to setup a scientific experiment following safety practices. Students will be able to gather and interpret data from an experiment. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of data and present it to others. Language Objective(s): Students will be able to measure using appropriate tools and record data appropriately. Students will be able to interpret visual, numeral and written data during different stages of the experiment. Students will be able to compare data, verbalizing and writing interpretations and conclusions.

Students will be able to write about the significance of mummification and its relation to science. Key VocabularyMummificationdehydrationsarcophagusamuletembalmercanopic jar | Supplementary Materials (per group for 5 groups)3 – 3. 5 pound plucked and un-injected chicken1 Roll of paper towels6 Gallon-size, freezer weight, zip lock bags6 Pairs of latex or vinyl gloves5 28 oz boxes of salt1 storage container with a tightly fitting lidShoebox or container for sarcophagusStrips of white cotton (ripped sheet)Canopic jarSpices (ground cumin, rosemary, thyme, cinnamon, or nutmeg)Newspaper| SIOP Features|

Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| ___ Adaptation of content_X_ Links to background_X_ Links to past learning_X_ Strategies incorporated| ___ Modeling_X_ Guided practice_X_ Independent practice___ Comprehensible input| _X_ Whole class_X_ Small groups___ Partners_X_ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| _X_ Reading_X_ Writing_X_ Speaking _X_ Listening| _X_ Hands-on_X_ Meaningful_X_ Linked to objectives_X_ Promotes engagement| _X_ Individual_X_ Group_X_ Written_X_ Oral| Lesson Sequence: The lesson and experiment will take 6 – 8 weeks.

Go over a brief explanation of the experiment introducing mummification and its significance to the Ancient Egyptians. Introduce new vocabulary terms as listed above. Have students do research on and see what they find on mummification in 30 minutes of class time. Give the students 20 more minutes to share the information they researched in small groups. The students will then share the information they found with the class. Step-by-Step preparation of the experiment to be done by students(1) Weigh, examine, and document the condition of the chicken. Have the students take notes and pictures. 2) Dry the chicken. Use paper towels to dry the inside of the chicken by stuffing it repeatedly with paper towels until there is no more moisture inside the bird. Then take the chicken and pat it dry on the outside until the paper towel is slightly sticking to the chicken. (3) Cover the outside of the bird with an assortment of spices. (4) Fill the inside cavity of the bird with salt. (5) Place the chicken in a zip-lock bag and pour remaining salt around the bird, rubbing the salt into the skin, avoiding the closure of the bag to ensure the bag will seal properly. 6) Double bag the bird in zip-lock bags. (7) Write the name of the group on the zip-lock bag and place it into the storage container. While the chicken is in the storage container students can use class time to further research mummification for written reports. Research and design the amulet and sarcophagus for their mummified chicken. They can then make their designed mask (head dress), amulet and sarcophagus. All of this will be done while working with their groups or individually depending on which activity is being done on that day.

In six to eight days – return to the chicken(8) Students will work together to retrieve the chicken from the container. They will then pour off the liquid that has be released, take the chicken out of the bag and place it on a newspaper. (9) The zip-lock bags will be thrown away, the salt will be removed from the inside of the bird and the bird will need to be dried carefully like it was in step 2. (10) Students will make observations and collect data on the changes in the chicken, making note of what they expected to happen and what actually occurred.

They will take notes and pictures to document any and all changes. (11) Students will then repeat steps 4 – 7 but with a single rather than a double zip-lock bag. Procedures 8 – 10 will need to be repeated every ten day at least three more times to complete the mummification process. During each round of procedures students will be required to keep their area clean and sanitary. The chicken is now ready for wrapping. (12) Remove the chicken from bag. Dry it and remove all the salt from inside and outside of the bird. Student should take notes and pictures. (13) Rub the chicken with spices. 14) Wrap the chicken in strips of white cotton, place on amulet, head dress and place in sarcophagus. Seal the sarcophagus. Have students take pictures. Students will then work in their groups compiling their notes, pictures and data to create an oral presentation they will give in front of the class. They will also use the notes and data in writing a written report about the importance mummification had on the Egyptian culture and its significance. This paper is to also include a reflection about their experience in the group and thoughts about mummifying a chicken and what they learned from the whole process.

They are to note what if any surprises they had and what was the most interesting and informative part of the lesson. The paper will be used as an assessment. | Reflection: Students will be able to use this experience as a hands-on interactive format that will allow them to showcase various skills. The students will have opportunities to work in groups and as individuals to show what the retained from an experiment that requires organizational skills. The lesson is beneficial in that it incorporates a learning opportunity for all levels of acquisition and learning styles.

Follow up on the experiment throughout the course of the year can also be done as you further examine the chicken. Each student could make a personal portfolio of the work that was done towards the mummification process along with the group presentation. ReferenceLab: The Mummification of a Chicken. Retrieved from http://www. camws. org/CJ/Chicken Mummification. pdf. | Resource 2: SIOP Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Class/Subject: 6th Grade English Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt Standards: 6. W. 1a-e; 6. W. 5; 7. W. 1a-e; 7. W. 5; B-8

Content Objective(s): * Students will be able to write a persuasive essay on why they would or would not want to be mummified. * Students will support and demonstrate clear reasoning for their position on mummification. * Students will be able to draft a conclusion paragraph for their persuasive essay. Language Objective(s): * Students will be able to orally present their persuasive essay. * Students will be able to summarize in writing why they may or may not want to be mummified. * Students will be able to listen to their classmate’s reasons for wanting or not wanting to be mummified. Students will be able to utilize revising, editing, and rewriting to strengthen their essay Key Vocabulary mummification canopic jars architecture culture tomb sarcophagus embalm diffusion religion papyrus| Supplementary MaterialsPencilPaper * Handout 1: Persuasive Essay RubricHandout 2: Peer Review Notecards| SIOP Features|

Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| _X_ Adaptation of content___ Links to background_X_ Links to past learning_X_ Strategies incorporated| _X_ Modeling_X_ Guided practice_X_ Independent practice___ Comprehensible input| ___ Whole class___ Small groups_X_ Partners_X_ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| _X_ Reading_X_ Writing_X_ Speaking _X_ Listening| _X_ Hands-on_X_ Meaningful_X_ Linked to objectives_X_ Promotes engagement| _X_ Individual___ Group___ Written___ Oral| Lesson Sequence: * The teacher will ask the students who their favorite movie star is and why.

Several students will be called upon to answer this question. The teacher will then explain that by stating their opinion and facts as to why that movie star is their favorite star, they are starting a persuasive argument. The teacher will then explain that for the next four days they will be working on persuasive essays on why they would or would not want to be mummified. Today, the students will be writing a rough draft (double spaced) based on research and information from their previous lesson on mummification.

The students are asked to use five or more of their key vocabulary as well. The essays need to contain an introduction, position statement, examples, and a conclusion. The students will be given Handout 1, which is a rubric to base their essays on. * Students will bring their persuasive essays to class and get in two a small group of two. The student and their partner will exchange their essays and read them quietly. The students will proofread and edit their classmate’s papers. The students will use Handout 2 to make sure their partner has these main points.

The student will write notes to their classmate in the space provided as well as on the rough draft. The students will be given the entire 50 minutes to work together and make any necessary corrections. * The students will bring their second drafts to class and each student will have individual conferences with the teacher. As the teacher is reviewing with each individual student, the remaining students can make changes to their essays and if their essays are done they can take note cards and create vocabulary flashcards. The students should have their final draft ready by the end of class.

If they do not have their final draft, they will need to finish it in their spare time. * The students will bring their final draft to class and be prepared to present it to the class. Each student will read their essay to the class. Once they are finished the class may ask two questions about the student’s essay that just presented. When the students are not presenting, they will sit quietly and pay attention to their classmates that are presenting. | Reflection:This lesson will focus on persuasive arguments, language learning, and proper writing adequate and positive reinforcement.

By starting the lesson off with asking the students who their favorite movie star is, it will engage the students in the lesson. By having the lesson as a persuasive essay, the students will also stay engaged because it is their opinions as well as facts. The handouts that are provided are a positive aspect because they will help the students to stay on topic and use as a guide. Another positive aspect in the lesson is the peer review groups and individual conference with the teacher. This will give the students an opportunity to work as a group, promote positive reinforcement, and gives the students a sense of responsibility.

The assessment for this lesson is also informal because as the students are diligently working, the teacher will observe the students as they work independently, with their partners, and when they present their essays. The lesson will take four days which could be a positive aspect or a negative aspect. Students will be given ample amount of time to write and edit their essays as well as get different points of view on how to edit their essay. Students, who do not have many corrections to make, may have too much time provided to them. This could cause for chaos. However, this is why the ocabulary flashcards can be created when there is down time. This lesson can be a positive aspect for those students who need more time for editing or writing. This lesson also incorporates listening, speaking, reading, and writing which are all key features for students to continue to work on. | © 2008. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Peer Review (Handout 2) Instructions: After reading your partners essay, write notes on each objective. For example, if your partner does an excellent job on an objective you may write “excellent” and why it was good.

If there is something they can work on, be sure to acknowledge it. Objective| Notes| The beginning of the essay starts strong and captures the attention of the reader. | | The author’s point of view is clear and communicates their stance on mummification. | | The writing shows understanding of the opposing viewpoint, and uses positive language. | | The author is in control of their language, and their argument includes supportive facts. | | The author uses proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation. | | The essay includes a conclusion. | | Name:__________________________________________Date:________________________ * Persuasive Essay Rubric (Handout 2) * | * Keep Trying (1 point)| * You’re Close (2 points)| * Good (3 points)| * Great! (4 points)| * Score| * Organization| * A position statement is absent or unclear. Supporting statements are unclear or not related. Disorganized; no transitions or transitions are not used correctly. No explanation to support the position. No conclusion; conclusion is not connected to the topic. | * Attempts a position statement. Minimal support.

Somewhat organized with simple transitions. Few examples and explanations; some not related to the position. Weak conclusion; mostly repeats the position statement. | * Position statement is clear. Good reasoning, details, and facts to support their position. Transitions fit the purpose. Organized. Good examples. Solid conclusion and connects with the position statement. | * Strong position statement fits topic and captures reader’s attention. Strong reasons, details, and facts. Excellent organization; good use of transitions. Many exceptional examples; lots of useful elaboration.

Strong Conclusion reinforces the position statement. | * | * Content| * No clear connection to the purpose of the essay. Examples inaccurate; confusing, or unrelated to the position. Not enough or unclear information. Vocabulary words not used| * Information sometimes repeated or wanders from the purpose. Examples and explanations are incomplete and not clear. Some accurate information but position is not developed. Two or less vocabulary words used. | * All information relates to the purpose of the essay. Examples and explanations help reader clearly understand the position.

Information present in an interesting manner. Two-Four vocabulary words used. | * Very interesting examples, evidence, and explanations that fit the purpose of the essay. Quality and quantity of information fully explain the position. Information is very convincing and easy to understand. Five or more vocabulary used properly. | * | * Style| * Many fragments and/or run-on sentences. Repeated words or phrases. Many misspelled words. No clear purpose. | * Mostly simple sentences or sentences begin the same way. Basic words and descriptions.

Style of essay fits the purpose but needs development; not persuasive. | * Different sentence structures. Variety in the way sentences begin. Familiar words fit the topic; descriptive. Style fits the purpose for the essay; persuasive. | * A variety of effective simple, compound, and complex sentences. Rich words are used to create mental pictures and keep the interest of the reader. Style fits the purpose of the essay; strong persuasion. | * | * Neat + CUPS| * Many errors in CUPS that interfere with reading; no sense of an essay. Shows lack of language skills.

Not readable. | * Some errors in CUPS that slow reader. Some problems with language. Not neat but readable. | * Few errors in CUPS and do not interfere with reading or understanding. Accurate essay format. Correct usage of language. Neat, readable. | * Minimal to no errors in CUPS; control of essay format. Skilled use of language. Exceptionally neat; obvious effort to engage the reader. | * | * Neat= Neatness C= Capitalization U=Usage P=Punctuation S=Spelling Total Score (16 points)| * | * (Miltenberger, 2013)

References * Arizona Department of Education (2012). Arizona’s common core standards. Retrieved from http://www. azed. gov/azcommoncore/elastandards/ * Miltenberger (2013). Persuasive Essay Rubric. Retrieved from http://www. slsd. org/webpages/jmiltenberger/writing. cfm? subpage=1527041 Resource 2: SIOP Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Class/Subject: Grade 6 Science Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt: Orion’s Belt Standards: AZ Learning Standards (Arizona Department of Education: 2005) Science Standards:

Concept 1: Observations, Questions, and Hypotheses PO 1, PO 2, PO3 Concept 4: Communication PO 1, PO 2, PO3, PO5, PO6 English Proficiency Standards: Listening LS-E2, LS-E, VP-E, VP-E2 Reading R07-S1C4, R07-S1C4-02, R07-S1C5, R07-S1C6 Writing W07-S1C1-01, W07-S1C1-05, W07-S1C3-08 Content Objective(s): * Students will understand the relationship between the Pyramids of Giza and Orion’s Belt. * Students will identify what links the Pyramids of Giza and Orion’s Belt. * Students will represent the relationship between the Pyramids of Giza and Orion’s Belt. Language Objective(s): Students will describe in detail the information presented, show the relationship, express their own thoughts through an in class discussion and a group presentation on the Pyramids of Giza and Orion’s Belt Constellation. * Discuss ideas about the pyramids and constellations. (Speaking) * Students have to discuss the relationship between the Pyramids of Giza and Orion’s Belts. (Speaking) * Give a group oral presentation. (Speaking) * Interpret information from articles provided to the student. (Reading) * Find information to support the main idea of presentation. Reading) * Summarize information for presentation (Writing) * Create a diagram showing the relationship between the constellations and pyramids. (Writing) Key VocabularyOrion’s Belt Osiris Constellations Cardinal Directions Alignment mimicshaft Polestar ArchitectureControversy | Supplementary MaterialsVocabulary Work Sheet, Vocabulary folder, article on Orion’s Belt and its links to ancient Egypt glue, scissors, markers, cardboard, 3 pre-constructed pyramid shaped objects, colored paper, 1 poster and one display box per goup| SIOP Features|

Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| v Adaptation of contentv Links to backgroundv Links to past learningv Strategies incorporated| ___ Modeling___ Guided practicev Independent practicev Comprehensible input| v Whole classv Small groupsv Partners___ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| v Readingv Writingv Speakingv Listening| v Hands-onv Meaningfulv Linked to objectivesv Promotes engagement| ___ Individualv Group___ Writtenv Oral| Lesson Sequence:40 minutes Introduction 1. Review what students recall about the Pyramids of Egypt 2.

Introduce Orion’s Belt: Talk about the important relationship between the star constellations & pyramids 3. Pass out an article that discusses Orion’s Belt and its links to ancient Egypt. 4. Discuss the hand out 5. Question: Ask students questions how and why they feel the pyramids were built 6. ————————————————- Have the class watch a short discussing the relationship between Osiris: God of Rebirth (Orion’s Belt) and the pyramids of Giza. (http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=oF-8llc6dWo)————————————————- 30 minutes 1.

Introduce vocabulary for the lesson 2. ————————————————- Handout vocabulary sheet: Students will be given 30 minutes to look up words in the dictionary with their group members (5 groups in all). When students finished, they will put the work in their vocabulary folders. ————————————————- 1 hour to prepare (group oral presentation) 1. Next the class will remain in their group; teacher will give all groups a box of materials which include glue, scissors, markers, cardboard, 3 pre-constructed pyramid shaped objects, colored paper, 1 poster and one display box.

Then hand out a paper showing the details of Orion’s Belt and the Pyramids of Giza. 2. The teacher will tell students they will have 1 hour to work with their group members to create a model of the Pyramids of Giza in the display box and they will have to create a poster depicting Orion’s Belt. They will also have to present their group poster in front of the class. Each group will have 5 minutes to present. (During this time the teacher will walk around and assist all groups where needed. ) 3. Students will be encouraged to use their vocabulary words in their presentations. 0 minutes to present 1. Student groups will now have 5 minutes to present their compare and contrast posters of the life cycle of their two animals. 2. Students will be given Homework. They must write 2 paragraphs Orion’s Belt and its relationship to the Pyramids of Giza. It will be due the following day 3. Class wrap-up| Reflection: 1. Where the students able to finish the assigned work and tasks successfully? 2. Did the student create informative presentations? 3. Where the student able to show the relationship between Orion’s Belt & the Pyramids of Egypt? . Was the lesson meaningful for the students? 5. What changes will I have to make the next time I introduce the lesson? 6. Were the students able to take what they learned from the previous lesson discussing the Pyramids of Egypt to help them understand today’s lesson? | Ancient Egypt Proportions SIOP Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Class/Subject: 6th Grade Math Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt/Proportions Standards: 6. RP. 1. Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities. 6.

RP. 3. Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e. g. , by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations. 6. RP. 3. d. Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units; manipulate and transform units appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities. Content Objective(s): Students will solve equations based on proportions and ratios. Students will create a scale model. Language Objective(s): The students will write equations for proportions for given information.

Students will be able to solve simple proportion problems based on given ratios with a partner. Students will use their solutions to create a paper scale model of a pyramid. Students will share their pyramids and why they chose that pyramid. Key VocabularyProportionsComparisonsHeightBaseDimensionsPyramidAngle of inclineConversionCentimeter / meterScale| Supplementary MaterialsPaperWriting utensilsCentimeter rulerTapeWritten quiz including three problems to write out the solution to proportion problems base on scaling down larger objects. SIOP Features| Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| ___ Adaptation of content_X_ Links to background_X_ Links to past learning_X_ Strategies incorporated| _X_ Modeling_X_ Guided practice_X_ Independent practice___ Comprehensible input| _X_ Whole class_X_ Small groups_X_ Partners_X_ Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| __ Reading_X_ Writing_X_ Speaking _X_ Listening| _X_ Hands-on_X_ Meaningful_X_ Linked to objectives_X_ Promotes engagement| _X_ Individual___ Group_X_ Written___ Oral| Lesson Sequence: (1) Discuss learning of Egyptians and the importance of the pyramids and how they are a symbols to history and the country similar to that of the Statue of Liberty for the United States or the Efile Tower in France. All of these are enormous and trying to recreate such a magnificent symbol would mean having to find a way to resize it also known as scaling. (2) Introduce the key vocabulary necessary for the lesson and assignment. 3) Review previous concepts including basic measurements and finding the area of a shape. (4) Explain how they are going to build a scale model of a pyramid based on proportions and ratios. (5) Give an example and model how to scale down large objects. Starting with the previous mentioned Statue of Liberty and Eifle Tower. (6) Have the students go through the steps together as a whole as they tell the teacher the steps as they scale down the Great Pyramid as a class. (7) Provide students with the dimensions of the Khafe Pyramid and the Menkaure pyramid.

Have the students break into partners to scale down the two pyramids into centimeters. Have the students compare their answers with another set of partners. (8) Have students return to their work areas and create a scale model of either pyramid based on their calculations. Students will use paper, ruler and writing utensils to create the three-dimensional model. (9) The students will then form into two groups based on what pyramid they chose and compare the models they made. (10) Students will then return to their work area for a quiz where they will have to solve three problems that are based on scaling down large objects. Reflection: Students will be given a multitude of experiences to work on proportions and ratios. Those experiences will include reading of problems, listening and speaking with other students to write and solve equations based on given information and then to a hands-on activity of creating a scale model based on their calculations. An extension would be to have students use a symbol or monument that meant something to them. This provides students to make it more personal and promotes other cultures. | Resource 2: SIOP Lesson Plan Date: Grade/Subject: 6th Grade Math

Unit/Theme: Ancient Egypt, Area/Area of Squares and Triangles, which make up a pyramid Standards: Math Standards: “6. G. 4. Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. ” (Arizona Department of Education, Pg. 32, 2012) Content Objective(s): All students will be able to calculate the area of squares by the end of the lesson. All students will be able to calculate the area of triangles by the end of the lesson.

Language Objective(s): All students will be able to read the directions and formulas for finding the area of squares by the end of the lesson. All students will be able to read the directions and formulas for finding the area of triangles by the end of the lesson. Key VocabularyArea| Supplementary MaterialsArea of Squares and Triangles Pre-TestArea of Squares and Triangles LessonArea of Squares and Triangles WorksheetsArea of Squares and Triangles Test| SIOP Features| Preparation| Scaffolding| Grouping Options| ?? Adaptation of content??? Links to background ?? Links to past learning??

Strategies incorporated| ???? Modeling?? Guided practice ?? Independent practice ? Comprehensible input| ??? Whole class ??? Small groups ??? Partners ?? Independent| Integration of Processes| Application| Assessment| ??? Reading ?? Writing ? Speaking ?? Listening| ? Hands-on ?? Meaningful ?? Linked to objectives ?? Promotes engagement| ? Individual ? Group ? Written ??? Oral| Lesson Sequence:Building Background:Start by giving students a pre-test. The pre-test will include squares, triangles, and squares and triangles that make up a pyramid combined.

They will have to find the area for each one. After the pre-test, go over the answers with the students so they can see how they did. Lesson on the area of squares and triangles:After the pre-test, introduce the lesson on the area of squares and triangles to the students. First explain what area means, and then show the students the formula for calculating the area of a square, and the area of a triangle. The area for a square is Area=a2, where a=the length of a side. The area for a triangle is Area=1/2 x b x h, where b=base and h=vertical height.

Now that the students have the formulas for calculating the area of squares and pyramids show them examples of each. Walk them through how to find the area of a square, and do the same for the area of a triangle, until everybody understands how to do so. Give them a couple of you-do’s, where they will have to find the area of each on their own. After they master finding the area of a square and a triangle, give them a pyramid and have them find the area of the square, and triangles for the pyramid. This may look confusing to the students, but all they are doing is combing what they worked on before into one problem.

They will be given the measurements for each problem they are working on. The lesson will take 1 whole day to go over, and for the students to understand fully how to calculate the area of squares and triangles. Worksheet on the area of squares and triangles:After giving the students the lesson on the area of squares and triangles, give them a worksheet they will need to complete. The worksheet will consist of many problems that have different size squares and triangles, as well as the two being combined together in one problem.

The students will have to calculate the area for all of these problems. They can work by themselves, or with a partner if they would like. This will take the whole class period for the students to finish. The worksheet along with the pre-test, and lesson, will prepare the students for the test they will have to take the day after they complete the worksheet. Test on area of squares and triangles:The test will be given the day after the worksheet, and they will not be allowed to use any notes from the previous days. They will have to remember the formulas to calculate the area for each figure.

The test will be very similar to the worksheet, but with different problems. They will have to find the area for each figure given to them. This test should take the whole class period for the students to finish. | | Ancient Egypt Final Project You have learned a lot about Ancient Egypt, now is your chance to show what you learned! You are an Egyptian Pharaoh. You want to be remembered by your subjects for a very long time after your death so you are leaving instructions for how to properly put together your tomb, build your pyramid monument and writing down your life story. For this project you will:

Haven’t Found A Paper?

Let us create the best one for you! What is your topic?

By clicking "SEND", you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails.

Haven't found the Essay You Want?

Get your custom essay sample

For Only $13.90/page

Eric from Graduateway Hi there, would you like to get an essay? What is your topic? Let me help you

logo