Apa Paper / Style - Microsoft Essay Example

Running head: SHORT VERSION OF TITLE 1 APA papers require a title page - Apa Paper / Style introduction. Include the information shown. Other information should be included if your instructor asks for it. Remember, your instructor always has the final say. Title FirstName LastName Strayer University Course # & Title To insert a header in Microsoft Word, select View | Header and Footer from the main toolbar. You can then left justify the line and type in a shortened version of the Title.

The title page also contains the words Running head: Add five spaces after the title, and then to insert an automatic page number, choose the Insert Page Number button on the Header and Footer toolbar. Instructor’s Name Date To center a line in Microsoft Word, select Format | Paragraph from the main toolbar, and then on the Indents and Spacing tab beside the word Alignment choose Center from the drop-down list. You can insert the date in Microsoft Word by selecting Insert | Date and Time… from the main toolbar and selecting a style. Enter a Continuous Page Break to allow a different header for the rest of the document.

Need

essay sample on "Apa Paper / Style"

? We will write a cheap essay sample on "Apa Paper / Style" specifically for you for only $12.90/page

More Microsoft, Office Essay Topics.

Go to Page Layout, Breaks, and select Continuous. Abstracts are only needed if your instructor requires one. SHORT VERSION OF TITLE Title The text of your document should begin on the first line (double-spaced**) after your title. You should indent the first line of text in each paragraph of the body of the document. To insert a header in More text here more Microsoft Word, select text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. View | Header and More text the more Footer fromhere main text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here.

toolbar. You can then More text here more left justify the line and text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. type in a shortened More Title. version of the text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text Note there is no here. head: here. To RunningMore text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text have a different header **Your entire paper should be double-spaced. Use the here. page text here on this Moreyou must more text here more text here.

More text here more text here more text automatic double-spacing command (accessible through enter a continuous page Format | Paragraph from the main toolbar in Microsoft here. the bottom of break on Word) because it is much easier to revise when you don’t the tile page and do have to go through and add hard returns after of the current When you want to insert a short quotation, you just include it as partevery line. ? line. NOT link this header to the previous page For instance, one of my favorite quotes by C. S. Lewis (1984) is from his book Till We Have header. 2 Faces. It goes, “Why should your heart not dance?

” (p. 96). After quoting something, you need to use a citation. If you have already mentioned the author in your text, then you only need to APA margins should be one inch on the top, bottom and right (and The left number when be 1 or something directly). If you use the year of publicationside. the page margin should quoting 1. 5 inches if binding is planned. To change your margins, select File | Page Setup from have talked about Microsoft Word. haven’t mentioned the author in text, orthe main toolbar in other things more recently so that it (Header and Footer margins should always remain at .

5 inches. ) could be confusing, then include the author’s last name in the citation. For instance, I like this quote as well, “I do not think that all who choose wrong roads perish; but their rescue consists in being put back on the right road” (Lewis, 1963, p. 6). More text here more text here more text here. More textthe last name ofhere authortext Generally, citations should have here more text the more and the year of publication. Direct quotations should include here. More text here more text here more text here. page number asmore text here more text the More text here well.

here. More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text If you use two works by the same author, published in the same year, then you need to include a letter here. here. More text here more text here more textafter the year. This is block quotation style. Double spacing is used. SHORT VERSION OF TITLE 3 Now let’s talk about chocolate. I have this book called 10,000 Dreams Interpreted, and it talks about what it means if you dream about chocolate: To dream of chocolate, denotes you will provide abundantly for those who are dependent on you.

To see chocolate candy, indicates agreeable companions and employments. If sour, illness or other disappointments will follow. To drink chocolate, foretells you will prosper after a short period of unfavorable reverses. (Miller, 1997, p. 143) When you want to quote something that is over 40 words long, then you indent the entire quotation one inch and you don’t use quotation marks around it. Also, with normal citations you put the period after the citation, but with block quotations, you leave it before the citation. In my further studies of dreams and chocolate, I checked out an online site to see if they agreed.

The site said, “To see chocolate in your dream, signifies self-reward. It also denotes that you may be indulging in too many excesses and need to practice some restraint” (Dream Moods, 2003, p. C3). In this case, the only author listed is the group author of the website, an organization called “Dream Moods. ” They do use page numbers on their site, so I wrote “C3” because I found the information under page 3 of the C entries. More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text Remember, the purpose of citations and the Reference here.

More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. page is to give the reader enough information so that More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. they can find the source. More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. More text end more text here more text only If you ever here up with only a heading or here. one line from the beginning of a paragraph at the bottom of your page, don’t use a page break.

Instead, place your cursor in the offending line, and select Format | Paragraph from the Microsoft Word main toolbar; then, on the Line and Page Breaks tab, select Keep with next. SHORT VERSION OF TITLE You should start a new paragraph whenever you begin to write about a new idea. There is not a minimum or maximum length for paragraphs, but make sure to try to cover each topic adequately and also without boring your reader. More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text 4 here. More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here.

More text here more text here more text here. More text here more text here more text here. Serif Sans Serif (Times New Roman) (Arial) Your font should be 12 point (this text is 12 point), and it should be a conventional serif or sans serif font (such as Times New Roman or Arial, shown). Times New Roman (the font this document is typed in) is a common serif font. Arial is a common non-serif font. Now, what if you want to use a quotation from the University of Phoenix library? For instance, this is an interesting quotation: “Indiana teacher Richard Beamer trusts his students with his life.

Last fall Beamer fulfilled his longtime dream of flying west at treetop level-in a plane built by his fifth-grade students at Southwood Elementary School” (Arce, 2003, p. 38-39). When you want to reference a source like this, you use the “journal article retrieved from an electronic database” format, found in section 53b, #22 of your Little, Brown handbook. E-text is another story entirely. ? The e-texts used by the University of Phoenix offer students the option to view or print the course text. The pagination for these two options differs greatly. Listed below are two examples of citing a quote taken from the print and view version.

• “Despite attractive opportunities, most businesses do not enter foreign countries” (Bishop, 2003, print version 14). • “Despite attractive opportunities, most businesses do not enter foreign countries” (Bishop, 2003, view version 24). A A SHORT VERSION OF TITLE 5 More information on e-text references can be found in your Little, Brown handbook, section 53b, #27. If you want to reference a work that has two authors, you list both authors in your citation. For instance, I often use Mad Libs to teach basic grammar concepts to my University students. After all, sentences like “Who could really [VERB] that there were two [PLURAL NOUN] in space?

” (Price & Stern, 2001) end up being a lot more fun than diagramming sentences. See your Little, Brown handbook, section 53b for more information. In your papers you may not always want to use direct quotations. When you paraphrase, you still need to use a citation. For instance, if I’m thinking about attitudes towards education, I could tell you that Bunt and Yang (2002) examine the Adult Attitude Toward Continuing Education Scale (AACES) to determine its effectiveness. This one only requires a year citation because I mentioned the authors in text, followed the mention directly with what they said, and they are listed on the References page.

However, if I tell you that the attitudes of college students are more easily influenced by peers than faculty norms (Milem, 1998), then this one requires the author’s name in a citation because I didn’t mention it in text. Neither require a page number because they are not direct (word-for-word) quotations. Finally, remember to choose a topic that you like for your paper. It is much harder to get writer’s block when you are interested in what you are writing. Remember also that your instructor has the last word. If your instructor wants to modify these guidelines for your class, then he or she has the right to do so.

The Writing Lab is here to help, but nothing can replace your instructor’s personal guidance. Use a ragged right margin (left justified) rather than an even right margin (full justified). To do this, place your cursor in the paragraph and select Format | Paragraph from Microsoft Word’s main menu, and in the dropdown box beside Alignment, choose Left. If there is a VERSION OF TITLE an individual, list the work SHORT group author rather than with the group name. References UOP Library entry 6 Arce, I. (2003). Flying high. NEA Today, 21 (4), 38–39. Retrieved January 21, 2003 from the Proquest database.

E-text entry Bishop, L. (Ed. ). (2003). Global business culture and organization [University of Phoenix Custom Edition e-text]. Lehy Publishing. Retrieved January 21, 2003 from University of Phoenix, Resource, GMGT/510–Global Business Culture and Organization Web site: https://ecampus. phoenix. edu/secure/resource/resource. asp Bunt, A. , Yang, B. (2002). Factor structure of the adult attitudes toward adult and continuing education scale and its capacity to predict participation behavior: Evidence for adoption of a revised scale. Adult Education Quarterly: A Journal of Research and Theory, 52 (4), 299-314.

Dream Moods. (2003, January 6). Dream dictionary. Retrieved January 14, 2003, from http://www. dreammoods. com/dreamdictionary/c2. htm Lewis, C. S. (1963). The great divorce. New York: Macmillan. Lewis, C. S. (1984). Till we have faces. San Diego: Harcourt. Alphabetize your references by author. Abbreviate first and middle names. Microsoft Word 2000 [Computer Software]. (1999). Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation. Milem, J. F. , (1998). Attitude change in college students: Examining the effect of college peer groups and faculty normative groups. The Journal of Higher Education, 69 (2), 117-140.

Miller, G. H. (1997). 10,000 dreams interpreted or what’s in a dream. Chicago: Rand McNally. Price, R. & Stern, L. (2001). Mad libs: The original #1 mad libs. New York: Price Stern Sloan. Use a hanging indent for your references. Either click and drag the bottom If you have more select Format | Paragraph author AND margin on the ruler bar, or than one entry with the samefrom the main toolbar. publishedSpecialsame year, add a lowercase letterindent. Under in the there is an option for a hanging after the year both here and in your citations, for instance, (1980a) and (1980b).

Haven’t Found A Paper?

Let us create the best one for you! What is your topic?

Haven't found the Essay You Want?

Get your custom essay sample

For Only $13/page