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Cape Caribbean Studies 2012 Report

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This paper consisted of four (4) sections — A, B, C and D. * Section A focused on Module 1, Caribbean Society and Culture, and contained two questions. Candidates were required to choose one question from this section.

* Section B, which focused on Module 2, Issues in Caribbean development, had two questions. Candidates were required to do one question from this Section. * Section C, which focused on Module 1, Caribbean Society and Culture, had two questions. Candidates were required to do one question from this section. Section D, which focused on Module 2, Issues in Caribbean Development, had two questions. Candidates were required to do one question from section. Sections A and B were marked out of 20 and were descriptive essays. Sections C and D were argumentative essays and were marked out of 30. Paper 02 was worth 100 marks. Section A Module 1 – Caribbean Society and Culture Question 1 Most candidates emphasized the social role of the family such as nurturing, caring, providing food and shelter but ignored the wider role of the family and failed to acknowledge the other functions of the family.

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Also, candidates failed to acknowledge the changes in the family and how this impacts society and culture. Candidates mentioned the popular family types but failed to mention same-sex families as an emerging family type. Some candidates had knowledge of families but could have deepened the discussion by citing examples to bring out the arguments, such as the incidence of crime and illegal drug use within the nuclear and extended families. Some full responses were produced on Hindu and Muslim families, particularly in Trinidad, Guyana and Jamaica.

A reasonable number of candidates who understood the question scored high marks. Question 2 On the whole, this question was fairly well done. Most candidates scored over 10 marks on this question by citing three well-known measures that can be taken to diminish the devastation which earthquakes can cause in the region. These measures included the relocation of houses and factories away from banks and hillsides. Other suggestions included educating the populace about the nature of earthquakes, the provision of shelters for persons living in endangered areas.

Candidates showed good knowledge and use of knowledge on this topic. Some candidates gave more than three measures to lessen the effects of earthquakes. Candidates demonstrated their knowledge on this topic by citing relevant examples and expanding on the topic. However, very few candidates scored highly on this question. Section B Module 2 – Issues in Caribbean Development Question 3 Candidates scored well on the knowledge concepts and also adequately developed that knowledge into well-structured essays.

However, most of the focus was on how technology has advanced development from an economic standpoint and less on human and sustainable development. Question 4 A number of candidates relegated productivity to an increase in production, paying little attention to the other concepts such as the efficient use of resources, human development and sustainable development. Most candidates did not make the link between productivity and efficiency, and could have improved their presentation by arguing that improved education and health services were contributing factors in the overall improvement in productivity.

A few candidates showed that improved technology contributed to an increase in productivity and showed how this was achieved. Section C Module 1 – Caribbean Society and Culture Question 5 This question was fairly well done by the majority of candidates. The majority received high marks, however some candidates received borderline grades and/or low marks. Those candidates who scored poorly did not make the link between the term key feature and the historical development of Caribbean societies; rather, they wrote about the enduring features of social stratification such as race, class, shade and religious affiliation.

Some candidates mentioned status symbols such as consumer items, that is, cars, houses, property and jobs, while a few identified education as the main determinant of social stratification today. Very few candidates disagreed with the topic sentence. There were indications that candidates who scored highly were knowledgeable about the topic and this was demonstrated in the presentation of their arguments. Question 6 The question encouraged a high level of analytical and interpretative skill. The question also required candidates to have a good knowledge of Caribbean culture.

Where candidates were knowledgeable of Caribbean culture and gave excellent examples, they sometimes failed to capture the essence of the question by linking these to the concepts of erasure and transformation. Overall, performance on this question was average. Those candidates who understood the question and offered developed arguments scored highly; however, these were in the minority. The candidates who performed well mentioned Indo-Caribbean cultural practices and those of Jews, Latin Americans, French creoles and Indigenous peoples.

Section D Module 2 – Issues in Caribbean Development Question 7 This was the more popular question in this section. Candidates opted to agree or disagree that it is feasible for the Caribbean to practise sustainable tourism. Many candidates seemed not be cognizant of the fact that sustainable tourism concerns an approach to tourism which ensures that all policies, activities and programmes for tourism are environmentally, socio-culturally and economically sustainable.

They discussed how the Caribbean can sustain tourism ensuring that the numbers of visitors increase every year. Also, some candidates looked at sustainability instead of sustainable tourism, and focused on the economic benefits of tourism rather than sustainable tourism. Candidates who scored highly were able to examine the feasibility of sustainable tourism and advanced points such as the expansion of ecotourism and the use of education. Question 8 This was the least popular of all eight questions.

Some candidates were fairly knowledgeable about some of the concepts and institutions associated with CARICOM but they were unable to give detailed discussions stating the extent to which they agreed with the statement that CARICOM would not last another five years in view of the challenges it faced. Many candidates focused solely on the challenges CARICOM faced and only a few discussed the areas in which CARICOM has been successfully promoting and providing avenues for social and economic integration. This question was poorly done by the majority of candidates.

Cite this Cape Caribbean Studies 2012 Report

Cape Caribbean Studies 2012 Report. (2016, Oct 01). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/cape-caribbean-studies-2012-report/

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