Compression of the last speech of Katherina’s between “Taming of the Shrew” and “10 things I hate about you.” - Literature Essay Example

   Compression of the last speech of Katherina’s between “Taming of the Shrew” and “10 things I hate about you.”

                   Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew” and its modern 90’s version “10 things I hate about you” is similar in plot, however different - Compression of the last speech of Katherina’s between “Taming of the Shrew” and “10 things I hate about you.” introduction. The basis of the story is the lovely Bianca cannot marry or date her beloved Lucentio until she finds a husband for her foul-tempered, and sharp-tongued sister Katherina.  Enter Petruccio who because of her high dowry, gets Katherina to marry him, then humiliates her by arriving late to the wedding dressed in ridiculous clothing, doesn’t let her eat or sleep claiming that the food and bed is proven unworthy of her, and by his own highhandedness bets his friends of his “Taming” Katherina, thus winning the bet of obedience he made with his friends in the end. Both versions also include Katherina’s last speech to the crowd.

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More Literature, Speech Essay Topics.

                  Katherina’s last speech in Taming of the Shrew, is at the request of Petruccio, after Katherina shows the audience her obedience.  The speech Katherina gives is about the duty that wives owe to their husbands.  Kate reprimands the other women for thier angry depositions toward their husbands, claiming it is unbecoming of a woman to  behave this way especially toward their husbands.   She further explains the duty that “The subject owes to the prince,” because the husband endures great pain and labor for her benefit (V. ii.159). Here Katherina admits that she was once haughty as Bianca, and the widow are now, however she has since changed her ways most willingly gives her obedience to her husband.

                The meaning of Katherina’s speech, at the end of the play is prone to many interpretations to this day.  Abhorrent to many feminists who translate Kate’s speech as surrendering to be a subservient to her husband by saying at different points of the play the man is the woman’s lord, king, governor, life, keeper, head and sovereign.  The character stereotypes woman as typically and physically weak compared to men suggesting women should make their personality mild to match the men.

                   Another way of viewing Katherina’s speech is remembering she has actively accepted Pertuccio’s courting and taming especially when she could have denied him at any time.  This suggests that Katherina is able to say something and mean something else entirely.  Despite her resistance at first, Katherina now views her marriage as a chance in finding harmony in a prescribed social role which imply that we should find happiness and independence within the roles to which women are assigned and not that woman should subjugate themselves to men. Katherina’s final speech is open to questions for many readers.

                   Similarities between “Taming of the shrew” and “10 things I hate about You,” also include the characters of Kat, Katherina (The person we are supposed to hate) seems to me the only person in town with a brain.  Patrick, the boy who tames the “Shrew” is just as mysterious, handsome, and vain, as Pertuccio, until he falls in loves Katherina.  Bianca is just as beautiful, good, mild, empty-headed and frivolous. Cameron is just as handsome, believing in courtly love.

                   “10 things I hate about you,” the loosely based modern version of “Taming of the shrew,” translates Shakespeare’s classic play differently. In this version beautiful and popular Bianca Stratford, is told by her strict father she is not allowed to date until her older sister Katherina, Kat does.  The problem is Kat is an outsider who alienates every boy who approaches her.  So Bianca’s “Boyfriend” Cameron bribes fellow outsider Patrick to ask Kat out, thinking Patrick who has a mysterious past, might tempt Kat to raise to his challenge.

                    Like Katherina in “Taming of the Shrew.” Kat feels alienated and an outsider rebelling against the normal “Cool Kids,” in school. She is much too intelligent and independent to deal with the nonsense of these people to do her own thing, not caring what anyone thinks of her.

                   Unlike Katherina in “Taming of the shrew.” Kat doesn’t seem to care and resents the fact she was put into the stereotype as a “Shrew,” because she is rebelling against the popular cliques of the school, which she was a once a part of. This is evident in Kat’s speech in the end of the movie. Katherina’s speech in “Taming of the Shrew,” seems to suggest Katherina’s surrendering to Pertuccio and his male gender, whereas, Kat’s speech is a poem she wrote for her English class after she finds out Patrick’s bet, where she seems to be surrendering to Patrick’s love. She tells Patrick, in the poem she she hates that she doesn’t hate love him. She forgives him and acknowledges him as her Intelligential equal.  Pertuccio is triumphant showing off in front of the audience at the end of the speech, because he had conquered the “Shrew.” Patrick gives Kat a guitar he’s brought with the money he had won from the bet for the future band she was going to form indicates Patrick cares and supports her interests.

                                              -Reference Site-

1.      The Taming of the Shrew analysis of characters. Sparknotes.com

2.   Shakespeare Magazine- A review of 10 things I hate about you by Nancy

           Goodwin

 

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