Concept of Identity - Society Essay Example

Concept of Identity

Every individual exist as something in particular and it has distinctiveness that is an element of what it is.  All things in this world have a definite character - Concept of Identity introduction. “This flower is red; its leaf is green, solid, dry, rough, and flammable.” In this case we are referring to a thing with a precise identity; the particular kind of identity, or the attribute discussed, is not significant. Its identity includes all of its features, not just those cited.   Identity was a function of predefined social roles and a conventional system of myths which provided point of reference and religious permit that ordered one’s place in the world and scrupulously constrained the dominion of thought and behavior.  Self identity gives answers to the fundamental question “Who am I?” Knowing oneself, discovering oneself, improving oneself,  , making oneself anew, conveying oneself, taking charge of one’s self, being contented with oneself, being embarrassed of oneself, are all essential and innermost to our understanding of what self-identity is.

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More Society, Anthropology Essay Topics.

According to anthropological folklore, in traditional societies, one’s identity was fixed, concrete and steady.  One was born and died as a member of one’s clan and tribe, a part of a fixed kinship system.  In pre-modern societies, identity was smooth and not subject to reflection or discussion. Individuals did not experience identity crises, or radically modify their identity.  One was a hunter or gather, and a member of the tribe, and that was that.  Identity became more mobile, manifold, private, self-reflective, and subject to change in modern times.  And this raises the question, is it the case that in modern societies one is caught up in so many unusual, at times disagreeing, roles that one no longer knows who one is?  If so, both identity, and the issue of identity, becomes increasingly problematic in modern times.

Identity is both subjective and objective.  Identity is what comes to mind when we think of ourselves, including both private and communal identities. It is our theory of our personality, what we recognize or can recognize about ourselves.  A man’s self is the sum total of all that he can call his, not only his body and his psychic powers, but his garments and his shelter, his wife and children, his ancestors and friends, his reputation and works. … If they shine and flourish, he feels victorious, if they drop off and die away, he feels discourage

The important aspect of one’s identity is identifying where a person comes from.  Most contemporary citizens know where they were born and what tribal and ethnical background includes them. Even people from centuries back and whose lives turn around the hall of their masters can remember the essentials about where they first became a person on this earth.  In our humanity, every self identity is presumed to be apart from other self, exclusive, and personal.  It is completely inevitable barely to the self.  The concept of identity makes it clear that reality has an exact nature and it is extremely vital. Given that reality has an identity, it is expected. Because it subsists in a particular means, it has no disagreement.

REFERENCES

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         http://www.importanceofphilosophy.com/Metaphysics_Identity.html

Oyserman, D. (2002).Blackwell Handbook of Social Psychology: Intraindividual Processes

          Retrieved December 14, 2008 from http://www.blackwellreference.com

Gingold.Retrieved December 14, 2008 from      http://strategichogwash.blogspot.com/2008/08/on-concept-of-identity-part-2.html

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