Educating Rita

Characters make transitions into the world through a variety of experiences. Explain how composers convey these transitions. Transitions into the world can be seen through Willy Russell’s two act play ‘’Educating Rita’’ through Russell’s structure of the play in two complete parts. We come to an understanding of Rita and Frank’s transitions and the positives and negatives that come with entering new worlds.

Furthermore, the first person narration in the short story by Jacqueline Winn ‘’In Flames’’ show the persona’s transition on her views towards her father change ever so greatly throughout the story and we come to an understanding of her personal growth as a response to this changing relationship. In Educating Rita, the foreshadowing of Rita’s transition can be shown immediately in the first scene as she struggles to enter Frank’s office due to the rusty handle.. It is symbolic of how difficult it may be for Rita to move into a new world.

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When Rita finally makes it through the door it allows us to measure Rita’s transition and as the play progresses, the door becomes easier for her to open, metaphorical of the fluidity she now has in transitioning between the upper and lower classes. Ironically, however, in Act Two, she changes her name back to Susan, showing that she is comfortable still with her old identity but is more educated and fulfilled as a tertiary woman. The motif of the window in Frank’s office is also symbolic of her need to have dreams and a metaphorical outlook, both aspects that Frank is disinterested in. I want to be like all those students out there, Frank. ” The reciprocal learning of the two protagonists, Rita through education and Frank through sobriety, is indicative of the value that each holds to the other, irrelevant of class. Russell further hyperbolises this relationship through the distinct lack of secondary characters or settings within the play, in order to focus solely on relationships and transition into new worlds between Rita and Frank. In contrast, the short story In Flames portrays a negative outlook on life and transitions into one of optimism.

A post-traumatic-stressed war veteran comes home to a family he is not familiar with. The metaphor ‘’My father’s hair went up in flames often’’ portrays through a visual metaphor the persona’s fear of her father’s always imminent anger. repetition of the second person pronoun, “you” gives the narrative a conversational tone, creating a relationship between the responder and composer. The inclusion of the responder appeals to the responder’s empathy as the first person narrator is confiding the personal details of her own experience.

The responder is placed in a position of trust and thus, we get to witness the transition to acceptance from the position of a proxy character. The transition made by the author reflects on the attitudes and views towards her father through contextual references to Australian history and nationalism such as, “Today’s ANZAC Day and it’s the first time in years that it’s even occurred to me to think about my father. ” The generic reference to a national holiday distances her from his father and assigns him a collective identity along with other ANZACs, yet foreshadows the potential for reconciliation through the time reference of years.

Transitions into the world can be seen through Willy Russell’s two act play ‘’Educating Rita’’ through Russell’s structure of the play in two complete parts. We come to an understanding of Rita and Frank’s transitions and the positives and negatives that come with entering new worlds. Furthermore, the first person narration in the short story by Jacqueline Winn ‘’In Flames’’ show the persona’s transition on her views towards her father change ever so greatly throughout the story and we come to an understanding of her personal growth as a response to this changing relationship.

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