Evidence-based falls prevention Essay

Translating Evidence-Based Falls Prevention into Clinical Practice

 

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Abstract

Translating evidence-based research into practice is a responsible mission - Evidence-based falls prevention Essay introduction. It requires important skills, regardless of “whether you are a nurse in private practice or work at a hospital community health setting” (Fitzpatrick & Wallace, 2008). It is more than important that the instruments used to translate evidence-based research into practice have sufficient validity and can make real difference with regard to patient outcomes. In case of falls, translating research into practice is particularly difficult, given the different definitions of falls, as well as the strict criteria used to evaluate the changes in the number and the quality of falls and fractures. Nevertheless, Colon-Emeric et al (2006) provide a detailed review of the way different instruments of translating research into practice work in real-life nursing environments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Translating Evidence-Based Falls Prevention into Clinical Practice

Introduction

Translating evidence-based research into practice is a responsible mission. It requires important skills, regardless of “whether you are a nurse in private practice or work at a hospital community health setting” (Fitzpatrick & Wallace, 2008). It is more than important that the instruments used to translate evidence-based research into practice have sufficient validity and can make real difference with regard to patient outcomes. In case of falls, translating research into practice is particularly difficult, given the different definitions of falls, as well as the strict criteria used to evaluate the changes in the number and the quality of falls and fractures. Nevertheless, Colon-Emeric et al (2006) provide a detailed review of the way different instruments of translating research into practice work in real-life nursing environments.

It is difficult not to agree to the fact that falls are the critical elements of morbidity among nursing facility residents. For many years, multiple-risk-factor reduction was considered the most reliable and the most effective tool of reducing the rates of falls and fractures in nursing facilities. However, where using nursing staff to translate the results of evidence-research studies remains a challenge, Colon-Emeric et al (2006) use Quality Improvement Collaborative – “a widely used method of translating evidence from trials into clinical practice”. In the discussed article, translating evidence-based research results was impossible without creating quality improvement teams, which participated in an all-day-long training sessions and could share their experience and commitment. Between such sessions, teams were given a chance to test the new knowledge and skills they acquired in the process of training. Although the use of the QIC as the method of translating research results into practice did not lead to any significant improvements in the rates of fall among nursing facility residents, the article has become the source of critical important knowledge in several ways.

The greatest area of learning which Colon-Emeric et al (2006) discuss is in the way QIC and other methods of translating research into practice work across different nursing facilities. The success of such evidence-based interventions largely depends on the way nursing facilities accept and adapt to change. For example, the authors suggest that “facilities were able to implement routine screening for fall risk without difficulty. In contrast, implementation of multiple-risk-factor reduction processes was disappointingly infrequent before and after the QIC” (Colon-Emeric et al, 2006). In this context, it is important to bear in mind that whether leaders can be persuaded in the effectiveness of the new practice predetermines its outcomes. Also, the complexity that usually accompanies multiple-risk-reduction interventions makes it impossible for nursing professionals to successfully adjust to changes and to use them as the sources of quality improvement. For example, change packages created to improve the quality of interactions between charge nurses and physicians require time, and their complexity does not depend on the method used to translate evidence-based research into practice (Colon-Emeric, 2006). Finally, the use of the QIC is not always accompanied by instruments and methodologies that could help better engage the nursing staff in various forms of multiple-risk-reduction interventions, for it is the quality of engagement that influences the quality and the speed of adopting new practices.

Conclusion

Translating evidence-based research into practice is a responsible mission, and the choice of appropriate translation methodology is not enough to guarantee the success of all translation initiatives. It appears that beyond using the QIC as the instruments of translating research into practice, nursing staff and physicians should be actively involved into various kinds of cooperation and collaboration. Multiple-risk-reduction ideas are complex and require time; that is why the positive (or negative) changes in the rates of falls may not be readily visible. Nevertheless, avoiding such translation attempts is initially destructive for the overall quality of nursing care, taking into account that evidence-based research and trials remain the major drivers of practical improvements in nursing facilities and related healing environments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Colon-Emeric, C., Schenk, A., Gorospe, J., McArdle, J., Dobson, L., DePorter, C. &

McConnell, E. (2006). Translating evidence-based falls prevention into clinical practice in nursing facilities: Results and lessons from a Quality Improvement Collaborative. J Am Geriatr Soc, 54 (9): 1414-1418.

Fitzpatrick, J.J. & Wallace, M. (2008). The doctor of nursing practice and clinical nurse

leader: Essentials of program development and implementation for clinical practice. Springer Publishing Company.

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