Facebook friendships

Prepared by Dr - Facebook friendships introduction. David Salisbury for the School of Creative Arts, James Cook University. Produced & Published by the School of Creative Arts, James Cook University.

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Subject Overview

Subject Description

This subject offers practical training in vocal techniques essential to develop effective speech capabilities. Students are exposed to and learn the skills required to communicate effectively in such contexts as formal discussions, debates, meetings, public presentations and seminars. It also enables students to develop a vocal signature and use it and their body in effective communication.

Subject Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:- 1. Describe the reciprocal roles of listener and speaker.
2. Analyse the voice and its role in communication
3. Demonstrate facility and confidence in speaking for a range of communicative purposes. 4. Demonstrate skills in oral interpretation
5. Demonstrate skills in interaction between purpose, audience and context. Teaching Schedule
Week
Week Begin
Lecture Program
Assessment Milestones
0
22 Jul

Orientation Activities
1
21 Oct
Introduction: assessment timeline;
assessment expectations; teaching
schedule; assessment rubrics;

Voice work
How the voice is produced
Breathing
Making pure sound

Revision: How voice is produced

Voice work
Releasing breath
Resonating sound
Releasing jaw and tongue

2
28 Oct
Voice work
Releasing the jaw
Tongue and soft palate
Resonators
Articulators

Speech Theory
Elements of a speech
1. Content
2. Voice
3. Non-verbal communication

Fun Exercises
Impro speech in a minute

Come to class with a speech prepared (familiar but not necessarily memorised); aprox 2 mins. This speech should NOT be written by you.

Active listening techniques
Open posture
Eye contact
Lips parted

Preparing a speech – mentally
What is the subject? Sentence.
How do I feel about it?
What do I want my audience to do, think or feel?

Come to class with a speech prepared (familiar but not necessarily memorised); aprox 2 mins. This speech should NOT be written by you. 3
4 Nov
Voice Revision
How the voice works
Breath
Touch of sound
Freeing the channel
Resonators (chest, hard palate, teeth, nose, sinus, skull)
Articulators (jaw, lips, tongue, soft palate)
Tongue twisters

Preparing a speech – physically
Practice standing comfortably, openly and confidently
Practice holding cards, books, piece of paper
Practice eye contact
Come to class with a speech prepared (familiar but not necessarily memorised); aprox 2 mins. This speech should NOT be written by you.

Warm-up
Relaxation (legs up wall, on chair, on floor)
Touch of sound
Sign out on vibrations
Jaw, tongue, lips

Reading of prepared text

Assessment 1a: Workshop task: Reading of prepared text (2 mins) 4
11 Nov
Review Assessment
What went right
What we can improve upon
Experience of being audience and what we can learn

Voice work
Review progression
Resonators
Articulators

Writing a speech (social)
Think of what you want to include in the speech; anecdotes, poems, lyrics,
jokes etc Find the personal connection (interests, known quirks)
Work out a theme or structure
Divide speech into three parts (beginning, middle, end) and work on the three parts. There may be students who still need to present Assessment 1a

The three-part speech
Introduction (quote, poem, lyrics, story, song)
Middle ‘the meat’ (three parts, three points, three observations) Conclusion (quote, poem, sound bite)

Activity: Self-Eulogy
List things you are known for (good, bad)
List things you are known to like (poems, movies, songs)
Choose a theme or/structure for your speech
In pairs, share what you have found

5
18 Nov

Week 5 Reflection
Voice work
Listening work
Structuring speeches
Observation of speeches

Voice work review
Release/relax
Posture
Resonators
Articulators

Activity: Self-Eulogy cont …
Divide middle into three (how would you divide middle up?)
Write middle parts
What will you use as an introduction and conclusion?
In pairs, share discoveries

Voice work review
Release/relax
Posture
Resonators
Articulators

Presentation work – NEW
Using microphones
Using lecterns
Using palm cards

Social Speech Preparation
What do I want the audience to do/think/feel?
Structuring speech
How will you be presenting (mic, lectern, palm cards, visual aids)

Come to class with notes for the social speech.
6
25 Nov
Warm-up
Relaxation (legs up wall, on chair, on floor)
Touch of sound
Sign out on vibrations
Jaw, tongue, lips

Social Speech Presentation

Assessment 1b: Workshop task: Presenting a social speech; Eulogy, Wedding, Special Event (2 mins)

Review Assessment
What went right
What we can improve upon
Experience of being audience and what we can learn

Fun Exercises
Impro persuasive speech in a minute

Persuasive speaking
You must be very clear WHAT you want the audience to believe (do/think/feel)

Activity: Brainstorm persuasive speaking topics (topics to be given by lecturer) Choose a side
Write down everything you can think of (making note of any specific points that need clarification or evidence) that supports your argument Write down everything you can think of that negates your argument Is there a theme?

7
2 Dec
Non-verbal communication work
Posture and stance
Gesturing and facial expression
Audience interaction

Persuasive Speaking
Things that MUST be included;
Define the topic
State clearly your theme (primary argument)
Demonstrate opinion using; personal examples, facts, expert opinions, social commentary Rebut (or pre-emptively rebut) opposing arguments
Conclude using theme

Discuss: Performance styles
Your personality MUST shine through
What affects us? Mothering, emotion, fear, humour
Confidence in presentation; open stance, keep weight forward, maintain eye contact Debate technique
1st speaker: define topic, states theme, overview of argument, presents one
argument 2nd speaker: restates theme, MAY recap 1st speaker, presents bulk of argument, rebuttal 3rd speaker: restates theme, MAY present an argument, bulk of rebuttal, concludes team’s presentation

Activity: Working with your debate team
Students get into groups of like-minded arguments (may need to swap some students around) Work on putting a presentation together

Come to class with notes for the debate.
8
9 Dec
Voice work review
Release/relax
Posture
Resonators
Articulators

Speech
Working with your group on your debate

Come to class with notes for the debate.

Non-verbal communication work review
Posture and stance
Gesturing and facial expression
Audience interaction

Speech
Working with your group on your debate

Come to class with notes for the debate.
9
16 Dec
Warm-up
Relaxation (legs up wall, on chair, on floor)
Touch of sound
Sign out on vibrations
Jaw, tongue, lips

The Great Debate Presentation

Assessment 2: Workshop task: The Great Debate
(4 mins/speaker)

Warm-up
Relaxation (legs up wall, on chair, on floor)
Touch of sound
Sign out on vibrations
Jaw, tongue, lips

The Great Debate Presentation

Assessment 2: Workshop task: The Great Debate
(4 mins/speaker)
10
23 Dec

Week 10 Reflection
Voice work
Listening work
Structuring speeches
Observation of debates

Planning an Oral Presentation
Deciding/Clarifying Objectives
Sourcing Content
Selecting Visual Aids
Structuring Presentation
Writing Presentation

Voice work review
Release/relax
Posture
Resonators
Articulators

Using Visual Aids during presentations
Background material (audio, visual, etc)
Visual highlighters (images, powerpoint)
Demonstrations
Interactive material

Practice Presentation
Opening and ending
Using dot points
Practicing with visual aids
Using Family and Friends

11
30 Dec

Creating a personal warm-up

Speech
Discuss issues with assessment 4
Review elements of a speech
Review possible aides to a speech

Presentation Preparation
Relax
Voice warm-up
Engage the brain
Check all material
Activity:
Write down the Objective of your speech.
Tell the person next to you your objective and ONLY what you’ve written down. Then, get them to paraphrase (in their own words) tell you what they think your objective is. Write down a possible structure for your speech

Mini speech (1 minute) to your partner about your topic.
Discuss with your partner, what they found interesting and what they found confusing.

Personal Warm-up

Research Presentations

Assessment 3:
Research Presentations 10min
Formal presentation in-class
12
6 Jan
Personal Warm-up

Research Presentations

Assessment 3:
Research Presentations 10min
Formal presentation in-class

Final Course Reflections
Creating speech content
Voice work
Non-verbal communication considerations

Discussion on future work in the field
Radio and/or audio presentations
On air camera presentations

Assessment 4
Digital Vocal Journal

20 Jan
Exam Preparations
N/A

27 Jan
Examinations
N/A

03 Feb
Examinations/SP53 End
N/A

* The schedule outlined here is indicative only. If the lecturer deems it necessary to spend more time on a particular task, modes of delivery may change to accommodate these variances during the course of the semester. Assessment deadlines however, are not open to negotiation. Mapping of Learning Outcomes and Related Content / Assessment

As a student it is important for you to understand how the essential learning outcomes are achieved throughout the subject in the way these are taught and assessed. The following table shows the alignment between the learning outcomes, the related content and assessment activities.

Subject Learning Outcomes
Related Content /Assessment
1. Describe the reciprocal roles of listener and speaker.
Workshops/Quiz and Digital Vocal Journal
2. To analyse the voice and its role in communication.
Workshops/Quiz and Digital Vocal Journal
3. To demonstrate facility and confidence in speaking for a range of communicative purposes.

Workshops/Quiz and Digital Vocal Journal/Final Presentation
4. To demonstrate skills in oral interpretation

Workshops/Quiz and Digital Vocal Journal
5. To demonstrate skills in interaction between purpose, audience and context. Workshops/Quiz and Digital Vocal Journal/Final Presentation
Approaches to Learning and Teaching

This subject uses a combination of approaches to teaching and learning, including both student centred and teacher directed approaches. The content of the subject may be disseminated using a variety of teaching strategies including lectures, practical demonstrations, personal guidance for individual projects and class critiques.

Students are expected to be active participants in the learning process and are encouraged to participate in class activities. All materials and resources referred to in this Subject Guide are available through JCU’s library holdings, e-journals, or databases. Any questions in relation to the manner in which this subject is delivered should be directed to the subject coordinator responsible for the overall delivery of the subject.

Resolving Conflict

All students should be aware of, and have read, the JCU Student Conduct Policy that details what constitutes inappropriate conduct and procedures for dealing with inappropriate conduct. This policy is available online:http://www.jcu.edu.au/studentequity/JCUDEV_005377.html

In a team based assessment item if members of a project team are experiencing difficulties with the functioning of the group dynamic or in the fulfilment of designated roles related to the delivery of a group assessment task it is critical that they approach the subject staff as early as possible so these issues can be documented and resolved.

If this does not bring about a satisfactory result, if a student feels particularly aggrieved by the behaviour of another student, or if a student
does not feel adequately supported in their designated responsibility, advice should be sought from the Subject Co-ordinator or the Course Coordinator. Serious matters related to bullying, personal conflict or untenable disputes of a personal nature should be referred to the Head of School.

Further services available within the University to assist students with conflict resolution include Discrimination Advisors as provided by the JCU Student Association:

http://www.jcu.edu.au/studentassoc/theassociation/studentsupport/JCUPRD_046117.html

and JCU’s Student Conflict Support Service:http://www.jcu.edu.au/scss/ Academic Staffing
Role
Name
Room
Phone
Email Address
Consultation Hours *
Subject Coordinator
Dr. David Salisbury
DA27_203
+617-4781-3157
[email protected]u.edu.au
TBA
Subject Lecturer

Mona Lim

Staff responsible for this subject
* For formal student consultations please make an appointment via email at least 24 hours prior to the published consultation times or see the lecturer before or after class to make a time. The subject lecturer will only answer
lengthy email queries on Wednesdays and Fridays. Class Times

Please check email correspondence and Learn JCU “Announcements” for any last minute changes.

In order to progress satisfactorily at university you should allocate 10 hours per subject per week. Students enrolled in CV1200 should attend university for a minimum of two hours of contact time each week and allocate additional hours to preparation, workshops, practice and revision.

Class Type
Day
Time*
Building & Room Number
Workshops

** Lectures will start on the hour and finish 10 minutes before the hour to allow change over to subsequent classes. Punctuality

Punctuality is a professional expectation that students need to observe. Sessions will start on time and punctuality is mandatory. If you are ten minutes or more late you may be excluded from class, at the discretion of the lecturer concerned. Student Needs

Students with a disability who require special arrangements or consideration should contact the Disability Resources Officer http://www.jcu.edu.au/disability/

Counselling offers a free and personal confidential service for enrolled students in relation to issues that may be affecting studies. • Personal counselling for students
• Workshops (e.g. Managing Stress, How to motivate Yourself) • Tailored workshops for specific student groups (e.g. Communicating in Group Work, Preparing for Placement)
• Support for academic issues
• Conflict resolution
• Critical Incident Stress Management
• Referral to other services as appropriate
Cairns: Tel: 4042 1150
Cairns Campus: Level 1, Building B1 – Library

The Faculty of Law Business & Creative Arts employs Indigenous Student Support Officers in Townsville & Cairns. Their role is to provide Indigenous students with resources and information to assist in studies. These include scholarships, tutorial assistance, traineeships through the National Indigenous Cadetship Program, textbook bursaries and much more.

Robyn Boucher, email: [email protected] ph: (07) 40421844, Building A1 Rm 22.83 Cairns.

Plagiarism

Reproduction without acknowledgement of another person’s words, work or expressed* thoughts from any source is plagiarism. The definition of words, works and thoughts includes such representations as diagrams, drawings, sketches, pictures, objects, text, lecture handouts, artistic works and other such expressions of ideas, but hereafter the term ‘work’ is used to embrace all of these.

Plagiarism comprises not only direct copying of aspects of another person’s work but also the reproduction, even if slightly rewritten or adapted, of someone else’s ideas. In both cases, someone else’s work is presented as the student’s own.

* to align with the Copyright Act which protects expressed thoughts which are reproduced, published, performed or communicated.

The JCU Library provides an online resource for effectively employing referencing in a creative arts context: http://libguides.jcu.edu.au/creative .

The University also provides extensive resources and programs to assist you with your studies and to improve your learning skills, an extensive list of such programs can be found on the “Current Students” JCU website: http://www.jcu.edu.au/learningskills/.

Resource Requirements

Referenced Texts, Materials and Equipment

There are no required texts for this subject. However, some texts and media will be referenced throughout the semester.

Further Reading

Texts from a variety of mediums will be referenced during the lecture program and, when necessary, discussed during workshop and seminar sessions.

What follows is a list of additional texts, which may provide the student with further inspiration and understanding. As is often the case, lists such as these are works in progress and are by no means complete. Students are encouraged to compliment this list and share access to, and knowledge of, suitable reference texts and online resources with their colleagues.

Websites, Media, Magazines & Journals
http://www.idebate.org/debatabase/topic index.php (current debate topics) http://www.actnow.com.au/Tool/Tips_on_public_speaking.aspx
http://www.uebersetzung.at/twister/ (tongue twisters in 117 languages) http://www.pecha-kucha.org/ (ref. for major presentation)
Subject Website on LearnJCU & School Handbook

Access the subject website through LearnJCU at http://learnjcu.jcu.edu.au for announcements, handouts, assessment summaries and more. Login using your JCU email username and password.

Students should also be familiar with the School of Creative Arts Handbook which contains important information related to policies and procedures, including students with special requirements; this is also posted in your subject site on Learn JCU.

Overview Of Assessment

Assessment Summary
Students must attempt all assessment items and receive at least a 50% overall score to pass this subject. Students are not required to satisfy the examiners in all assessment tasks, however, they must obtain at least an average of 40% for invigilated components within the subject. Students should also be aware that no individual assessment piece should be taken as an indication of your final grade. Raw marks may also be subject to moderation or scaling.

Item
Description of Item
Invigilated
Weight
Due Date
Submission Method
1a & 1b
Workshop tasks
Yes
20%

In class
2
The Great Debate
Yes
30%

Formal presentation in class
3
Research Presentation
Yes
30%

Formal presentation in class
4
Digital Vocal Journal
No
20%

Copy on CD or USB

Assessment Submission Notice
Assessments must be submitted by 3pm on the due date unless otherwise stated in the course outline. Pay careful attention to the submission requirements as you may be required to submit a digital copy to the SoCA Digital Drop Box as well as a hard copy to the Assignment Drop Box in the foyer of the SoCA Admin office. When submitting any form of digital files please ensure that you follow the following file naming protocol : Jagger_JC199567_CV1200_1

Where “Jagger” is your last name, “JC199567” is your JC number, “CV1200” is the subject code and “1” is the number of the assessment item. For group submissions, include each group member’s last name alphabetically; for brevity we will drop the JC Number in this instance : Jagger_Richards_Watts_CV1200_1A

Where “Jagger”, “Richards” & “Watts” are the last names of the group members, “CV1200” is the subject code and “1A” is the number of the assessment item.

When handing in hard copies to the Assignment Drop Box make sure you sign and date stamp the assignment cover sheet provided. Students who are found to be cheating this system will be graded as a fail. The school takes very seriously any attempt to subvert the systems put in place to assure an equitable submission process of assignments. Absenteeism & Assignment
Extensions

Students who have been absent for medical reasons, have a letter from a counsellor, or statutory declaration re family bereavement and are seeking academic consideration in the form of an assignment extension should supply supporting documentation to the SoCA office. These students will be required to also complete an absence form setting out details of both the time frame, nature of their absence and details of the subjects and staff affected. Details of the absence will be forwarded to the relevant staff and the documents will be retained at the SoCA office for possible future reference.

Once these forms have been submitted you may be able to negotiate an extension of your assessment deadlines with the subject coordinator. In some cases this will need to be brought to the attention of the Head of School. Issues with software bugs, computer hardware failure or confusion arising from cumulative deadlines are not legitimate excuses. See below, Student Data Management. Late Submission Penalties

Late assignments unaccompanied by the appropriate certificates will incur a 10% reduction per day from the final mark. For example if an assessment is worth 30 marks of the overall marks available for the subject (ie 30%) then each day that the assignment is late represents a reduction of 3 possible marks.

Student Data Management
It is considered to be a default scenario that any student studying a Creative Arts subject which involves the use of home or laboratory computers for assignment completion has backed-up their work on either an external Hard Drive or personal USB stick. The SoCA and JCU lab computers themselves have been scripted to wipe clean the desktop, and remove any locally stored files upon reboot. If you have any questions about this process please consult the Subject Coordinator.

Rules For Assessment

Supervised Individual Assessment

You are not required to satisfy the examiners in all assessment tasks but you must obtain a final mark of at least 50% to pass the subject. In addition, the expectation is to obtain at least an average of 50% over all invigilated components* within a subject to pass the subject overall, any student who does not achieve a pass in the invigilated components may, in exceptional circumstances, be reviewed by the School Assessment Committee.

*It should be noted that invigilated components include but are not limited to: in class tests; presentations; examinations; a task that takes place under the supervision of a member of the teaching staff or can be authenticated as the student’s own work, for example by a viva voce.

Assessment completion

To be eligible to pass this subject, participants are expected to attempt all forms of assessment and must demonstrate a reasonable degree of competence in the required subject learning outcomes as examined in each form of assessment. Students who have completed less than 100% of the assessment will be subject to review by the School Assessment Committee which could result in an overall fail.

Supplementary Exam for Final Subject

A candidate who has failed a single subject towards the award in their final teaching period and who gained 40% or more of the marks for that subject may be granted a supplementary examination in that subject. However if that subject is required for accreditation, then the criteria specified by that accreditation will apply.

Supplementary (NS) Rule

The School Assessment Committee may award a supplementary grade “NS” to a student who in exceptional circumstances does not achieve a pass in the
subject assessment. The subject coordinator/lecturer would need to provide evidence to support their recommendation for an NS grade that may include special consideration application from the student; sound attendance and participation in class; engagement in online tutorials; assessment submitted on-time.

Detail of Assessment Items
Item
Description of Item
Assessment Detail
1a & 1b
Workshop tasks
There will be two assessable workshop tasks during this semester; a prepared speech and a self-written social speeches. Both of these are to be two minutes in length and will be undertaken prior to the more formal presentations.

2
The Great Debate
The Great Debate will be a group exercise but student will be assessed individually. Time will be given in class to prepare. Each student will contribute a 4 min speech during their debate. Time must be strictly adhered to (30secs difference allowed either way). 3

Research Presentation
Students present an individual research speech, 10 minutes in duration. Each student selects a topic or subject of their own choosing that evidences the following; primary and secondary research data, utilisation of different arguments and an informed and emerging point of view. The presentation should be varied and engaging for the audience and 10 minutes in length. Students may utilise a variety of support aids to enhance their presentation such as video, power point, music etc. Students are required to adhere to time limits.

4
Digital Vocal Journal
Students keep a vocal journal with analysis and reflection of their own personal development in Effective Speaking detailing breakthroughs in speaking and listening evidenced by research. A minimum of 3 mins/week is expected totalling aprox 36 mins for the completed journal.

Mapping of Graduate Attributes and Qualities
JCU Graduate Attributes
Related Content / Assessment
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

1.1 the ability to think critically, to analyse and evaluate claims, evidence and arguments, and to reason and deploy evidence clearly and logically Workshop Tasks, Major Research presentation, Reading Presentation 1.2 the ability to adapt knowledge to new situations

Workshop Tasks, Listening Diary
1.3 the ability to deploy critically evaluated information to practical ends Major Research Presentation
1.4 the ability to define and to solve problems in at least one discipline area Major Research Presentation
Self reliance and interpersonal Understanding

2.1 the ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences Workshop Tasks, Major Research Presentation, Reading Presentation 2.2 the ability to lead, manage and contribute effectively to teams Workshop Tasks

2.3 the ability to work with people of different gender, age, ethnicity, culture, religion and political persuasion Workshop Tasks
2.4 the ability to work individually and independently
Major Research Presentation
Literacy and Numeracy

3.1 the ability to read complex and demanding texts accurately, critically and insightfully Major Research Presentation, Reading Presentation
3.2 the ability to speak and write clearly, coherently and creatively Major Research Presentation, Reading Presentation, Workshop tasks, Listening Diary 3.3 the ability to generate, calculate, interpret and communicate numerical information in ways appropriate to a given discipline or discourse

Information Literacy

4.1 the ability to find and access information using appropriate media and technologies Major Research Presentation, Workshop Tasks
4.2 the ability to evaluate that information
Major Research Presentation, Workshop Tasks
4.3 an understanding of the economic, legal, ethical, social and cultural issues involved in the use of information Major Research Presentation, Workshop Tasks,
4.4 the ability to organise to select and organise information and to communicate it accurately, cogently, coherently, creatively and ethically Major Research Presentation, Workshop Tasks
Learning Achievement

5.1 the acquisition of coherent and disciplined sets of skills, knowledge, values and professional ethics from at least one discipline area Reading Presentation
5.2 the ability to use a variety of media and methods to retrieve, analyse, evaluate, organise and present information Major Research Presentation
5.3 the ability to reflect on and evaluate learning, and to learn independently in a self directed manner Listening Diary, Vocal Journal
5.4 the ability to manage future career and personal development Listening Diary, Reading Presentation,
Using tools and technologies

6.1 the ability to select and use appropriate tools and technologies Major Research Presentation
6.2 the ability to use online technologies effectively and ethically Major Research Presentation
Graduate qualities

7.1 exemplary personal and professional moral and ethical standards Major Research Presentation
7.2 a commitment to lifelong learning and intellectual development Major Research Presentation
7.3 an understanding of regional issues
Workshop Tasks
7.4 a sense of professional, community and environmental responsibilities Listening Diary
7.5 willingness to contribute to the intellectual, cultural and social life of the regional, national and international communities Workshop Tasks

Rubrics

*All assessments must be submitted onto learn jcu, penalties will apply if students fail to do this.

Workshop Tasks: 20% of Overall Mark
Chosen Speech: 10%
Social speech: 10%

Rubric Prepared by Arminelle Fleming

Item
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Advanced
Excellent
Superior
T
Preparation: 25%
Preparation is unimpressive; little or no evidence dialogue & movement exercises were undertaken Preparation is adequate; little evidence dialogue & movement exercises were undertaken effectively Preparation is adequate; voice, movement, text & improvised exercises were undertaken in rehearsal

Preparation was impressive; voice, movement, text and improvised exercises were undertaken in rehearsal

Preparation was outstanding; voice, movement, text & improvised exercises were undertaken in rehearsal /25
Verbal Communica-
tion Skills 25%
Verbal concerns became the focus; including;
mumbling, monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Verbal concerns were evident including; monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Relatively interesting; evidence of; glottal attack, nasality, uneven pace, use of key words, pause, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and well-rehearsed; clear articulation; appropriate volume; good key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and rehearsed with sophistication; clear articulation; excellent key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range, resonance and volume /25

Non-Verbal Communica-
tion Skills 25%
No eye contact with audience exhibits awkward habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot, back and forth and clutching at clothing Little eye contact with audience exhibits minimal habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot Establishes eye contact with audience during some of the presentation, movement is still, stiff or erratic Established eye contact with audience during most of the presentation; demonstrates good alignment hand movement, enthusiasm and confidence Excellent alignment, hand movement and eye contact; exudes enthusiasm and confidence /25

Audience Engagement
25%
Presented facts with no imagination; went off topic and lost the audience
Mostly presented facts with little or no imagination; at times held audience attention Presented facts
that held audience attention for most of the presentation
Involves the audience in the presentation; held audience attention throughout Involves the audience with heightened creativity involving risks that held and controlled audience attention /25

The Great Debate Rubric 30% of Overall Mark

Rubric Prepared by Arminelle Fleming
Item
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Adequate
Good
Excellent
T
Preparation: 15%
Preparation is unimpressive; most text was difficult to understand; dialogue & movement did not make sense; and generally confusion prevailed Preparation is adequate; some text is difficult to understand; dialogue & movement does not always make sense Preparation is adequate; dialogue & movement make sense and the performance demonstrates a clear understanding of the chosen reading Preparation is impressive; dialogue & movement is well rehearsed; the chosen reading was researched and brought to life in presentation Preparation is outstanding; dialogue & movement is very well rehearsed; the reading is thoroughly researched and brought exquisitely to life in presentation /15

Effective Group Member: 10%
Ineffective group member demonstrates very little cooperation or cohesion within the group Group member demonstrates the ability to contribute

Cooperative group member demonstrates the ability to contribute effectively Effective group member demonstrates heightened cooperation and cohesion
within the group Outstanding group member, demonstrates leadership qualities and sophisticated knowledge and understanding of the tasks required /10

Audience Engagement: 15%
Presented facts with no imagination; went off topic and lost the audience Mostly presented facts with little or no imagination; at times lost the audience Presented facts
that held audience attention for most of the presentation
Involves the audience in the presentation; held audience attention throughout Involves the audience with heightened creativity involving risks that held and controlled audience attention /15
Verbal Communication Skills: 30%
Verbal concerns became the focus; including;
mumbling, monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Verbal concerns were evident including; monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Relatively interesting; evidence of; glottal attack, nasality, uneven pace, use of key words, pause, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and well-rehearsed; clear articulation; appropriate volume; good key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and rehearsed with sophistication; clear articulation; excellent key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range, resonance and volume /30

Non-Verbal Communication Skills: 30%
No eye contact with audience exhibits awkward habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot and clutching at clothing Little eye contact with audience exhibits minimal habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot Establishes eye contact with audience during some of the presentation, movement is still, stiff or erratic Established eye contact with audience during most of the presentation; demonstrates good alignment hand movement, enthusiasm and confidence Excellent alignment, hand movement and eye contact; exudes enthusiasm and confidence /30

Research Presentation Rubric 30% of Overall Mark
Item
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Advanced
Excellent
Superior
T
Content/
Theme 10%

Purpose and theme of the presentation is not clear. The content is lacking in depth and scope Purpose and theme of the presentation is at times clear but often somewhat muddy or vague. The content is lacking in depth and scope at some levels Presentation has a clearly stated purpose and theme, but may have one or two elements that do not seem to be related; depth and scope of content is cohesive, and coordinated at most levels Presentation has a well-stated clear purpose and theme throughout with excellent depth and scope of content that is cohesive, and coordinated Presentation shows an exceptional well-stated clear purpose and theme with outstanding depth and scope of content that is cohesive, and coordinated at all levels /10

Coherence, Structure
and Organization 10%
Concept and ideas are not connected; lacks transition; flow and organization Concept and ideas are loosely connected; lacks clear transitions; flow and organization are choppy Most information presented in logical sequence; generally very well organized, better transitions from idea to idea and medium to medium required Research topic is clearly stated developed and well organized; examples are appropriate and develop the presentation; conclusion is clear; shows control; flows together well; good transitions; Research topic is exceptionally stated and well organized; examples are appropriate and develop the presentation; conclusion is clear; shows control; flows together; excellent transitions; /10

Evidence of Research
10%
No research
Minimal research
Mostly internet references
References are from a variety of sources
Wide ranging use of sources which are appropriately handed within the speech. /10
Audience Engagement
20%
Presented facts with no imagination; went off topic and lost the audience Mostly presented facts with little or no imagination; at times held audience attention Presented facts
that held audience attention for most of the presentation
Involves the audience in the presentation; held audience attention throughout Involves the audience with heightened creativity involving risks that held and controlled audience attention /20
Verbal Communication Skills 25%
Verbal concerns became the focus; including;
mumbling, monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Verbal concerns were evident including; monotone, glottal attack, sibilant ‘s’ nasality, uneven pace / rhythm; poor use of breath, pause, pitch, range and resonance Relatively interesting; evidence of; glottal attack, nasality, uneven pace, use of key words, pause, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and well-rehearsed; clear articulation; appropriate volume; good key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range and resonance Interesting and rehearsed with sophistication; clear articulation; excellent key word stress, pause, pace, pitch, range, resonance and volume /25

Non-Verbal Communication Skills 25%
No eye contact with audience exhibits awkward habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot, back and forth and clutching at clothing Little eye contact with audience exhibits minimal habitual body and hand movement, shuffling from foot to foot Establishes eye contact with audience during some of the presentation, movement is still, stiff or
erratic Established eye contact with audience during most of the presentation; demonstrates good alignment hand movement, enthusiasm and confidence Excellent alignment, hand movement and eye contact; exudes enthusiasm and confidence /25

Digital Vocal Journal Rubric 20% of Overall Mark

Rubric Prepared by Arminelle Fleming

Item
Un-Satisfactory
Satisfactory
Advanced
Excellent
Superior
T
Analysis: 25%
level of personal preparation: risks, originality, practical and theoretical techniques explored Analysis conveys little or no evidence of a personal response to preparation and to the issues/concepts raised in effective speaking Analysis conveys some evidence of a personal response to an area of preparation and to the issues/concepts raised in effective speaking Analysis conveys evidence of a personal response to more than one area of preparation and to the issues/concepts raised in effective speaking

Analysis conveys evidence of a personal response to most areas of preparation and issues raised in the process of performance. Student demonstrates s/he is beginning to develop personal growth and performance awareness Analysis conveys extensive evidence of a personal response to all areas of preparation and issues raised inside and outside class. Student demonstrates personal growth and performance awareness /25

Accuracy: 25% degree of understanding exercises and processes taught Student alludes to what is heard in class by notating many inaccuracies Student makes minimal reference to what is heard in class by omitting important
in-class exercises

Reflection indicates that the student is listening by notating exercises learned in class Reflection indicates that the student is listening well in and outside class by notating accurate understanding of exercises and processes taught Reflection indicates that the student is listening well in different contexts and is able to relate what is heard, to what is read, to what is experienced /25

Reflection: 50%
your reflection and understanding of the value of the work

Journal does not demonstrate an ability to reflect on own work, but records information only

Journal demonstrates an ability to reflect on own work, but does not provide many examples

Student reflects on own work and improvement by providing several examples Student reflects on own work and improvement by providing many examples, begins to demonstrate good meta-cognition Student reflects well on own work and improvement, demonstrates a range of meta-cognitive practices and consistently provides examples /50

Student Acknowledgement Form

Subject Title: EFFECTIVE SPEAKING CV1200
By ticking the following boxes, I hereby acknowledge that I have read, understood and agree to the following aspects relevant to this subject:

Key component
Tick 
Staff consultation times and procedures for appointments/contact

Attendance requirements

Required texts, references and materials

School charges pertaining to this subject (if applicable)

Assessment requirements

Assessment due dates

Assessment submission procedures

Assessment criteria

Policy on extension of assignment due dates

Penalties for late submission of assignments

Procedures for accessing support for disabilities

Criteria pertaining to the award of grades

JCU policy regarding plagiarism

JCU policy regarding supplementary/deferred exams

Student number:

Student name:

Signature:

Date:

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