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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Leadership Education and Training (LET)

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JROTC
Program of Instruction (POI)
U.S. Army
Cadet Command
Ft. Monroe, VA
1 June 2010

(Updated 1 June 2010)
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION:
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

JROTC Cadet Creed
I am an Army Junior ROTC Cadet.
I will always conduct myself to bring credit to my family, country, school and the Corps of Cadets.
I am loyal and patriotic.


I am the future of the United States of America.
I do not lie, cheat or steal and will always be accountable for my actions and deeds. I will always practice good citizenship and patriotism.
I will work hard to improve my mind and strengthen my body.
I will seek the mantle of leadership and stand prepared to uphold the Constitution and the American way of life. May God grant me the strength to always live by this creed.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Program of Instruction (POI) Cover Page

Total Computed Academic Hours: 720 (180 hours per year for four years) Approval Authority: U.

S. Army Cadet Command, Director, JROTC Approval Date: 1 July 2010
Supersedes POI Date: This POI supersedes the POI updated 15 September 2006. Minor Changes and Additions: Changes and additions that do not substantially alter the intent of this Program of Instruction (POI) or the Leadership Education and Training (LET) lessons will be posted on the JROTC web portal. The changes and additions should be annotated where needed and the original notice kept behind the POI in the Instructor Desk Reference.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Table of Contents
Total Computed Academic Hours: ………………………………………………………………………. 3 Approval Authority: ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 Approval Date: …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 Supersedes POI Date: ………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 Minor Changes and Additions: ……………………………………………………………………………. 3 Preface ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 Status: …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Training Location(s): ………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Chapter One: Introduction
………………………………………………………………………………. 6 1-1 Purpose ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 1-2 Collaboration ………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 Chapter Two: Course Scope …………………………………………………………………………… 8 2-1 Course Goals ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 2-2 Program and Cadet Learning Outcomes ………………………………………………….. 8 2-3 Core Abilities ………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 2-4 Competencies ………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 2-5 National Standards ……………………………………………………………………………… 10 2-6 Course Prerequisites …………………………………………………………………………… 10 2-8 Substitution of Credit ……………………………………………………………………………. 11 2-9 Training Start Date ………………………………………………………………………………. 12 2-10 Proponent ………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 2-11 Instructor Requirements/ Course Remarks ……………………………………………. 13 Chapter Three: Curriculum Information …………………………………………………………… 13 3-1 Basis of the Curriculum ………………………………………………………………………… 13 3-2 Assessments and Tasks ………………………………………………………………………. 14 3-3 Cadet Learning …………………………………………………………………..
………………. 15 3-4 Instructor and Cadet Teaching ………………………………………………………………. 15 3-5 Lesson Plans ……………………………………………………………………………………… 16 3-6 Learning Plans ……………………………………………………………………………………. 16 3-7 Learning Materials ………………………………………………………………………………. 16 3-8 Beating the Odds ………………………………………………………………………………… 17 3-9 Teen CERT ………………………………………………………………………………………… 17 Chapter Four: Scheduling Information …………………………………………………………….. 17 4-1 Traditional and A/B Block Schedule ……………………………………………………….. 18 4-2Scheduling Options ………………………………………………………………………………. 19 4-3 LET Training Units and Chapters …………………………………………………………… 21 Appendix A: Core Lessons by LET ……………………………………………………………………. 22 Appendix B: Health Lessons Recommended Sequence ……………………………………….. 28 Appendix C: PE Lessons Recommended Sequence ……………………………………………. 29 Appendix D: Contact Information for Table C ………………………………………………………. 30 Appendix E: Table C: JROTC Leadership Education and Training Program- Approved Elective Training ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 31 Appendix F: Teen Cert Lessons ………………………………………………………………………… 32 Appendix G: McREL Standards by LET ……………………………………………………………… 35 LET 1 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary
…………………………………………………… 35

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

LET 2 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary …………………………………………………… 35 LET 3 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary …………………………………………………… 38 LET 4 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary …………………………………………………… 40 Appendix H: JROTC Traditional Block Schedule Recommendations………………………. 41 Appendix I: JROTC 4×4 Accelerated Schedule Recommendations ………………………… 42 Contributed by LTC George W. Gehr, Former Senior Army Instructor, Fort Knox High School …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 43

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Preface
Status: Directorate Approved
Training Location(s): Three- or four-year high schools
Chapter One: Introduction
1-1 Purpose
The Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps/National Defense Cadet Corps (JROTC/NDCC) is a program that is offered at the high school level and teaches high school students the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling in them self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. Though this POI refers to JROTC, all provisions of this document are applicable to NDCC. The mission statement reflects the overall meaning and purpose of
JROTC, which is “To Motivate Young People to be Better Citizens” by preparing high school students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. The program promotes graduation from high school by providing curriculum, Leadership Education and Training (LET), and rewarding opportunities that will benefit the student, community, and nation in the present and future. Though JROTC is an acronym it has transcended its original name; therefore, it will henceforth be referred to as JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program.

1-2 Collaboration
Development of good citizenship, team building skills, effective oral and written communication, global awareness, wellness, and physical fitness is accomplished through a multi-faceted, blended curriculum. Professional instructional designers and serious gaming experts integrated their custom development with state of the art commercial programs to provide a world class, multi-media, student-centered product aligned with standards in all fifty states. This collaboration of leading edge development and commercial products allows for teaching success using the latest educational, brain based research. The following commercial programs and materials support the JROTC curriculum:

The Worldwide Instructional Design System (WIDS) Team, an educational group operating under the Wisconsin Technical College System Foundation, Inc, provided the model, methodology, and software used to develop core abilities, competencies, performance standards, and learning plans. The WIDS Team also updated lesson plans and linked content to each state’s standards.

The lesson format was provided by Dr. Steven Dunn, author of Brain Compatible Learning for the Block. Dr. Dunn provided training to curriculum work groups and writers and assisted with the review of the lessons during production. The National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) provided the High School Financial Planning Program (HSFPP) ®, which also used the WIDS process and Dr. Dunn’s four phase lesson format.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Written Communication for Sergeants, developed by Susan Hughes is an excellent resource for students to learn writing skills and to prepare for the written portion of the SAT.
Winning Colors (WC)® by Stefan Nielson of Aeon Communications, Inc. is used in schools and corporations as a readily understandable present time behavioral observation indicator.
The Success Profiler® designed to measure and improve emotional intelligence is a product of the Conover Company.
Components of the You the People (YTP)® curriculum are incorporated into the program and Charles Heberle, the author, has worked with the writers to integrate the process into the lessons.
Chief Justice®, created by Robert Aucone is an active learning program that explains the judicial branch of our federal government.
We the People (WTP)® developed by the Center for Civic Education to promote civic responsibility in students, is integrated into the Citizenship in American History and Government lessons.
Will Interactive, Inc.®, a leader in interactive training, behavior modification, and performance improvement, developed several virtual experiences that help Cadets make better choices. Examples include: Interactive Nights Out 2 (drug abuse prevention), Hate Comes Home and Just 2 Days (conflict resolution, diversity, responsibility),Saving SGT Pabletti, (developed for the Army to create an awareness of sexual harassment in a unit is available for use by Senior and Junior ROTC Cadets emphasizes the importance of Army values),

Challenge I and Challenge II (highly effective when used with Unit 2 lessons on leadership. Challenge I addresses basic principles of leadership for LET 1 (core) or LET 2 leadership lessons. Challenge II addresses leading oneself as well as leading teams and integrates core leadership principles found in Franklin-Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens).

In Real Life: Sexual Harassment in Schools®, by Concentrics, Inc., provides insight into how to recognize and resolve incidents of sexual harassment. Lions-Quest® is a comprehensive, values based program that focuses on a positive prevention approach and a broad range of life skills that can be consistently taught and reinforced. Lions-Quest Service Learning is a teaching strategy that facilitates skillsbased classes and the successful execution of a service-learning program. Thinking Maps® by Innovative Learning Group create a common visual language that promotes integrated thinking and interdisciplinary learning. Eight graphic organizer-like maps are used to teach specific thought processes across disciplines and LET levels.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Classroom Performance System (CPS) ® by e-Instruction is a technology based productivity tool used for direct instruction, assessment, evaluation and management. It promotes active learning with full student engagement and participation. Beating the Odds (BTO)/Quarterbacks for Life (QBoL) ® The Quarterbacks of Life Foundation provides students with the opportunity to experience a proven and timetested pathway to success for use in school and in life. Chapter Two: Course Scope

2-1 Course Goals
This POI focuses on the development of better citizens by building skills in leadership, citizenship, life success, geography, cultural awareness, wellness, and fitness in a structured interactive environment. The JROTC program is a cooperative effort on the part of the Army and the host institution to provide high school students with opportunities to become well rounded citizens. The flexibility of the program allows it to bear the scrutiny of professional educators and to meet the needs of the community. Satisfactory completion of the program can lead to advanced placement credit in the Senior ROTC program at participating colleges or advanced rank in the Armed Forces. Several components of the course have been identified for
college credit that is awarded to Cadets upon successful completion of the specified requirements. In addition, several components have been identified to meet high school graduation requirements while gaining leadership skills through the program. The JROTC program is one of the Army’s contributions to assisting America’s youth to become better citizens. The program produces successful students and productive adults, while fostering in each school a more constructive and disciplined learning environment. This program makes substantial contributions to many communities and ultimately to the nation’s future. It is the centerpiece of the Department of Defense’s commitment to America’s Promise for Youth through its emphasis on service learning, community service, and teen anti-drug efforts.

2-2 Program and Cadet Learning Outcomes
These program outcomes describe what JROTC Cadets will know and be able to do upon successful completion of the JROTC program. These outcomes also provide documentation for growth and development of the student and program for reaccreditation purposes, school visitors, parents, and the community. This program intends to teach Cadets to:

1. Maximize potential for success through learning and self-management. 2. Develop leadership skills.
3. Incorporate principles of mental and physical wellness into behaviors and decisions. 4. Build effective relationships with peers, co-workers, and the community. 5. Apply physical and political geography to building global awareness. 6. Correlate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship to the purposes of U.S. government.

7. Relate events in U.S. history to choices and responsibilities Americans have today. 8

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

8. Characterize the role of the military and other national service organizations in building a constitutional republic and maintaining peace in our society. 9. Develop and pursue a plan for postsecondary success.

2-3 Core Abilities
The JROTC Core Abilities describe the broad, life-long skills that every Cadet needs for success in future life and career endeavors. The core abilities are a result of the goals and values that drive the JROTC program and are built upon over the programs four years through integrating various lesson competencies and skills throughout the JROTC curriculum.

1. Build your capacity for life-long learning.
2. Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques. 3. Take responsibility for your actions and choices.
4. Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world. 5. Treat self and others with respect.
6. Apply critical thinking techniques.
With each lesson the instructors explicitly introduce, teach, reinforce, and assess the core abilities that relate to the core competency being introduced. The core abilities will be displayed prominently in JROTC classrooms so that Cadets will know, recite, and view them as essential components of their lessons.

2-4 Competencies
A competency is a major skill or ability needed to perform a task effectively and efficiently. Performance assessment is driven by competencies. Each JROTC lesson addresses a competency that is the intended learning result of the lesson. Competencies describe discipline-specific measurable and observable skills, knowledge, and attitudes. Performance standards (criteria and conditions) provide the specifications for assessing mastery of a competency. Cadets show they have learned competencies by applying them in the completion of assessment tasks that require them to do one or more of the following:




make a decision
perform a skill
perform a service
solve a problem
create a product

Instructors explicitly introduce, teach, reinforce, and assess the competency as the learning target for every lesson. They help Cadets take responsibility for their own learning by directing them to review the competency and its performance standards (criteria and conditions) at the beginning of the lesson and by pointing out that informing themselves about the performance expectations is the Cadets’ first step toward learning success. Instructors use the competency as the target for all assessments and the performance standards as the guidelines for evaluating and providing feedback about Cadet performance in relation to that competency.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

2-5 National Standards
The JROTC curriculum fully or partially addresses a number of the McREL academic standards:
Citizenship
Civics
Economics
Geography

Health
Language Arts
Life Skills
Life Work

Self Regulation
Thinking and Reasoning
U.S. History
Working with Others

© 2003 McREL
Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning
2550 S. Parker Road, Suite 500
Aurora, CO 80014
303/337-0990
www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarks
The Army JROTC curriculum is linked to McREL K-12 content standards entitled Content Knowledge: Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education. McREL is a nationally recognized, private, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving education for all through applied research, product development, and service. The purpose of McREL standards is “to address the major issues surrounding content standards, provide a model for their identification, and apply this model in order to identify standards and benchmarks in the subject areas”.

2-6 Course Prerequisites
1. Completion of the eighth grade.
2. LET: For LETs 2 and above after completion of LET 1.
3. Schools that do not provide at least two classrooms or schedule students so that all LET levels are not in one classroom will be probated. (LET 1 should always be taught separately with the exception of upper level Cadets who may assist in instruction). *When LETs 2 and 3 are taught together, LET 3 may be sequenced before LET 2. LET 1 is prerequisite to both LET 2 and LET 3. Strong LET 3 and 4 Cadets can assist in leadership and mentorship of LET 1 Cadets as well as middle and elementary school students.

JROTC consists of up to eight levels of LET instruction. Materials are provided for the Traditional/Block (LET 1-4) and Accelerated Block (LET 1-8) JROTC programs. Each LET level must total 180 academic hours (or the required number of hours for academic courses equaling 1.0 credits) to
include core and elective requirements. Host institutions are required to award credit toward graduation for each year of the JROTC program and requested to award credit for embedded subjects such as health, wellness, fitness, personal finance, character development, freshman orientation, civics, etc. 2-7 Course Length and SizeHigh schools are required to provide a minimum of three years of JROTC on a traditional schedule (45/50 minutes daily) or may provide 90/100 minutes every other day, as in an A/B block schedule. Some schools provide 90/100

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

minutes daily on a 4×4 block schedule, utilizing the LET 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, through 4b sequence; referred to as the Accelerated Block Schedule, providing up to eight years of JROTC curriculum instruction. The same core content is required in both Traditional and Accelerated Block scheduling and is modified to meet time constraints for the lessons. Though schools have the option to conduct a three-year program, instructors are encouraged to use parts of the LET 4 curriculum in order to provide leadership application opportunities. Military institutes require a four year program. Spring/Summer JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge (JCLC) is an additional component of the three- and four-year programs and supplements the JROTC curriculum. For those attending, additional focus is placed on developing Cadets’ character, leadership skills, and abilities. Lessons from Foundations for Success; Leadership; Wellness and fitness; Geography; and math and science awareness are expanded on during JCLC.

Normal Course Length- Weeks: 104 at 26 per year.
Hours: 720 at 180 per year.
Academic Hours:
Mandatory Core:
Electives:
Total:

Traditional (LET 1-4)
520
200
720

Accelerated (LET 1a/b-4a/b)
520
200
720

Class Sizes: Optimum – 20, Maximum – 30
Instructor Student Ratio: Optimum – 1:20, Maximum – 1:30 2-8 Substitution of Credit
Instructors are encouraged to work with their Brigades to pursue equivalency or substitution credit for JROTC. Coursework such as Health/PE can be substituted without the instructor having to be certified as a Health/PE teacher (See Appendix B and C, respectively). Upon completion of the approved JROTC course, Cadets receive credit toward graduation in the equivalent required area. However, Cadets do not normally receive an extra course credit toward graduation, just the assurance that the graduation requirement was fulfilled and the course credit awarded for those JROTC courses. Transcripts need to indicate the requirements were met. See the table below for other courses and their equivalent substitution to meet graduation requirements. Instructors can teach alone or on teams with teachers licensed in the appropriate areas to gain credit other than elective. JROTC units, in cooperation with host institutions, may also allow credit for college level, honors, international baccalaureate, and advanced placement courses in subject areas commensurate with this POI. JROTC leaders have selected several curriculum products that have been developed nationally and are recognized as being of exceptional quality and relevance to today’s high school students. Because these products align so well with the JROTC target

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

learning outcomes, the designers have incorporated them into the curriculum. Prime examples are the NEFE High School Financial Planning Program and We the People. If a host school already offers one of more of these curricula, JROTC instructors have a number of options:

a. Determine whether the duplication is actual or perceived. If differences are more a matter of perception and the JROTC curriculum will add significant enhancement and extension of learning; continue to teach the course.

b. Collaborate with the local teacher who uses the curriculum to maximize the learning results with additional practice and application opportunities, promote social experiences and the JROTC program.

c. The instructor can inquire with the schools administration if graduation credit can be obtained by the JROTC instructor versus a traditional teacher for specific topics such as the NEFE program. This would allow the JROTC instructor to meet their programs requirements, reduce ratios for the school’s teacher, and allow the Cadet to gain graduation credit for completion of the topic.

d. Substitute approved electives for the duplicated curriculum and count on the other course to do the job. Share assessment tasks, lesson and learning plans when collaborating with other teachers in order to confirm mastery of the competencies with open ended questions. This is excellent evidence for inspections and accreditation of the school and the JROTC program.

Note: Each school district has its own approval
Equivalency Credit for JROTC
process; therefore JROTC personnel should follow
Courses
local procedures to achieve a positive outcome. For
example, in some schools in Florida, Army JROTC

Cadets are allowed to earn equivalent required
Course
graduation credit in life management skills for
Equivalency
completing LET I and LET 2. Many other states,
such as Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, California,
South Carolina, Ohio, Kentucky, etc., also allow
equivalency credit if locally approved. The POI
JROTC
Required
Program
provides the flexibility to link the standards for
Course
Student
Student
elective credit, and additional credit in subject areas
Outcomes
Outcomes
such as Physical Education, Health, Wellness, Life
Management Skills, Freshman Orientation,
Government, Civics, Practical and Performing Arts, Careers, etc. Gain the support of local school administrators such as principals and superintendents by showing them that the National Standards align with JROTC curriculum.

2-9 Training Start Date
Training is conducted on a school-year basis. In year-round schools, JROTC will follow the school policy in establishing the start of a new school year. 12

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

2-10 Proponent
Design and Development: U.S. Army Cadet Command (USACC) DCS, Army JROTC Course Proponent: USACC DCS, Army JROTC/Host High Schools

Instructor Provided Support: USACC DCS, Army JROTC, Brigades and Host Schools
Training Evaluation Proponent: USACC DCS, Army JROTC, Brigades, and JROTC Unit/Host Schools
2-11 Instructor Requirements/ Course Remarks
The JROTC web portal serves as a valuable resource for all JROTC instructors and must be accessed a minimum of 3 times weekly. Curriculum enhancements, student texts and instructor materials are available for downloading from the school, home or library. Updates to the curriculum are posted to the web portal monthly. It is the instructor’s responsibility to acquire and implement the updates. The web portal also provides access for worldwide threaded discussion groups to enable JROTC instructors to share best practices, lessons learned and successful classroom strategies or activities (www.usarmyjrotc.com).

JROTC units may elect to conduct a technical program (tailored to support programs such as Cisco Academies and other skills-based career programs), an academic (traditional) program, or a combination of both programs.

JROTC units may also elect to form a band and/or drum and bugle corps at the discretion/approval of the Senior Army Instructor/Director of Army Instruction/Commandant, host institution, and Cadet Command as integrated curricular activities.

JROTC curriculum materials must be ordered electronically through the U.S. Army Publishing Agency, Army Publishing Directorate, St. Louis, MO, using the USAPA website at www.apd.army.mil. Curriculum inventory items and ordering procedures can be found on the JROTC web portal under Curriculum/Forms and Publications. Chapter Three: Curriculum Information

3-1 Basis of the Curriculum
Cadet success is the main goal of all JROTC learning experiences. The JROTC curriculum is based on the principles of performance-based, learner-centered education. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe identified the stages where desired results could be achieved and then planned instruction and learning experiences that would mirror those results. Learner-centered,
performance-based learning specifies desired results (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) in advance of instruction; explicitly states standards used to measure performance, requires learners to perform the competency as evidence of achievement, and provides learners opportunity to develop each competency.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

As a result, Cadets:




Learn skills they can use; not outlines of information or isolated facts Know the performance expectations up front
Engage as active partners in the learning process
Document accomplishments and competence
Learn how to learn

3-2 Assessments and Tasks
The JROTC curriculum is performance-based. Cadets demonstrate the skills, apply the knowledge, and model or exhibit behaviors representing the desired attitudes; thus, assessment tasks serve as tools for verifying and documenting that Cadets have mastered the competencies. To help instructors and Cadets determine when Cadets have reached proficiency, each competency is defined by a set of performance standards that are compared against assessment tasks or scoring guides (rubrics). These tools not only allow Cadets to determine their strengths and weaknesses; they show Cadets’ growth over time; and validate their grades against the competencies. Instructors benefit from the scoring guides with grading consistency; feedback on their teaching techniques when there are high successes or failures; and providing documentation for JROTC and school inspection and accreditation processes.
The JROTC curriculum uses a balanced assessment approach to assessing learning. Three different types of assessments are used:

Traditional assessments focus on fundamental curriculum knowledge through the use of classroom assessments, assignments, tests, quizzes, and standardized tests. These assessments can be completed and maintained through the CPS program. Cadet portfolios focus on process, product, and growth. Key features are reflection, goals setting, emotional intelligence, academic growth over time, and self evaluation. Instructors have the responsibility to ensure that each Cadet maintains a portfolio beginning in LET 1 upon entry into the JROTC program thru their JROTC career. Instructors are required to review portfolios with Cadets annually and, if possible, more often.

Portfolios can be used as informal assessments that provide insight to the Cadets’ achievements and growth over time and are a collection of work based on accomplishments, personality, goals, and aspirations. Cadets maintain scores for specific competencies for each LET and Cadets reflect on their experiences. Over the course of the four years, Cadets and Instructors have documentation of growth. This record is a required component of the program and will be reviewed during inspections and accreditation processes.

Required content in the portfolios is outlined in CCR 145-2. Inspection evaluation criteria of Cadet Portfolios include the following:
The portfolio

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program





contains all the baseline requirements (LET 1)
is legible and well organized (can be organized by topic, chapter, or LET level as long as organization of all unit portfolios is consistent)
is created and put together by the Cadet
tracks changes on Cadet self-assessment and goal setting; highlighting growth from year to year
shows evidence of Cadet reflection on learning and growth

Performance assessments focus on standards, competencies, application, and transfer of knowledge. Cadets document mastery of the competencies by completing performance assessment tasks included in the Student Learning Plans, or by completing an adaptation of the assessment task developed by the instructor. Cadets

Though formal assessments such as multiple-choice, paper-pencil exams may be useful in providing feedback to Cadets about their initial grasp of knowledge and ability to remember facts and information, they are not adequate for the task of assessing Cadets’ mastery of the competencies. Combining informal assessments such as completing performance assessment tasks included in the curriculum or by completing an adaptation of the assessment tasks are required to demonstrate mastery of the competencies. (Adaptations should be rated using a scoring guide such as a rubric that includes the criteria for the target competency.)

3-3 Cadet Learning
The JROTC program is intended to engage Cadets in active learning. Learner-centered activities dominate the Cadet learning experience and allow Cadets to continuously engage in all learning stages (inquire, gather, process, and apply) of the learning process. Peer collaboration and teaching, group discussions and interaction, hands-on activities, and other activities allow for active learning in contrast to listening to Power Point lectures. Following the cues provided in the curriculum managed lessons will enable Instructors to facilitate the learning process for the Cadets. Each unit provides mentally and physically challenging integrated or
co-curricular activities that include some or all of the following: service learning/community service, JCLC, Raider Team activities, leadership symposium and academic bowl (JLAB), drill and ceremony, and safety and civilian marksmanship.

The objective of these activities is to:
a. provide Cadets with the opportunity to practice leadership skills. b. allow Cadets a chance to participate in citizenship building exercises. c. help Cadets develop team spirit and unit sprit.
d. develop in Cadets the skills to demonstrate individual mental and physical fitness. 3-4 Instructor and Cadet Teaching

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Peer teaching allows learners to be active participants in their learning and the class. Instructors act as supporters or facilitators of students who are peer teaching by creating an inviting and productive learning environment with encouragement, coaching, direction, and feedback.

JROTC curriculum designers developed learning activities that actively engage Cadets by incorporating varied learning styles and multiple intelligences. Instructor “presentations”, are brief and are never the dominant teaching strategy. 3-5 Lesson Plans

JROTC lesson plans provide a guide for facilitating Cadet learning described in student learning plans. Each lesson plan identifies a target competency, linked core abilities, and learning objectives. Lesson plans provide detailed guidelines for facilitating Cadet learning activities and information about the learning materials, supplies, and resources required to support student learning.

Instructors are required to use lesson plans in conjunction with learning plans as tools for planning, facilitating, and assessing learning. Lesson
plan cover sheets describe learning principles (e.g. multiple intelligences, thinking processes, reflection, Bloom’s taxonomy, and authentic assessment) present in the lessons and indicate how the lesson addresses McREL Standards, JROTC program outcomes, and core abilities. Not only does incorporating these learning principles into lessons meet diverse learning needs of the students, but they are important documentation for inspection and accreditation purposes for the school and JROTC program.

3-6 Learning Plans
JROTC learning plans are designed to support Cadet learning. Learning plans answer questions Cadets need to know about what they will learn; guide Cadets through the four-phase lesson; help Cadets take responsibility for own learning; and support Cadets’ ability to manage and adjust their own thinking and learning processes (metacognition). Instructors need to ensure Cadets have and review learning plans throughout each lesson. Instructors or Cadet Leaders will:




Highlight the target competency and other information provided Explain why that information is important (ex. criteria/conditions – tells Cadets how they will be evaluated on their performance)
Show Cadets how learning plans can help them
Guide Cadets to refer to and use the learning plan throughout the learning process

3-7 Learning Materials
The JROTC curriculum provides a rich assortment of learning materials keyed to learning outcomes. Student textbooks are provided in two formats. The hardbound textbooks for Units 1-6 contain the entire JROTC curriculum (required core and elective lessons). The required curriculum for Cadets is pulled from those texts and organized in Core LET Textbooks (softbound).
Both the instructor lesson and student learning plans

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

identify suggested learning materials. The JROTC program provides the recommended learning materials on the curriculum manager and in textbooks. Additional recommended materials are available online or from other sources at little or no cost. JROTC Cadets and instructors are encouraged to enrich and expand learning by seeking out additional learning materials that align with the JROTC program outcomes, core abilities, and competencies.

3-8 Beating the Odds
The Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program provides students with the opportunity to experience a proven and time-tested pathway to success for use in school and in life. This practical, educationally relevant, and dynamic blueprint is taught using narration, activities, and real life mentor stories of people who have beaten the odds in the face of adversity using five (5) Stepping Stones to Success featured in this program, namely Dreams & Goals, Self-Esteem Resource Review, Team Support, Decision Making and Planning, and a Positive Mental Attitude. The five (5) Stepping Stones are introduced in six (6) JROTC lessons.

Unit-Chapter-Lesson
U2-C3-L2
U2-C4-L4
U3-C1-L1
U3-C1-L5
U3-C4-L3
U4-C1-L5

Lesson Title
Goal Setting
Decision Making and Problem Solving

Self Awareness
Pathways to Success
Communicating in Groups
At Risk-Suicide Symptoms and Prevention

3-9 Teen CERT
Teen CERT is a 7-unit high school emergency response National Training curriculum developed by the Department of Homeland Security. This 20-hour training initiative includes instructor and student learning materials for implementation of the program. Topics covered in the curriculum include fire safety and basic fire combating techniques; recognizing injuries and basic first aid, CPR, basic team building and emergency communications systems. Over 20 JROTC lessons are marked as preparatory lessons for the Teen CERT curriculum, equipping Cadets to serve as local community leaders in the preparation and implementation of the emergency response simulation. See Appendix I for Lessons including TEEN CERT.

Chapter Four: Scheduling Information
Whether schools are on a traditional block or accelerated block schedule, the following term applies. The term “hours” is defined for JROTC courses the same as it would apply to any school system. A unit hour translates as a 45/50 minute block of instruction/class period. Schools on a block schedule provide 90/100 minutes of instruction that can be taught as two 45/50 minute classroom sessions.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

4-1 Traditional and A/B Block Schedule
Students attend JROTC for 45/50 minutes each day or 90/100 minutes on an A/B schedule throughout the school year; both schedules allow the instructor to follow Table A: LET1-4
Example A/B Block Schedule: In an A/B Block schedule, students and teachers meet on alternating days for 90/100 minutes rather than meeting every day
for shorter periods. For instance, a Cadet in LET1 attends JROTC year round, 2-3 times per week; MWF in week 1, TuTh in week 2, MWF in week 3, TuTh in week 4, and so on for the school year, fall and spring semesters.

Table A: LET 1 – LET 4
Mandatory Training Hours*
Unit 1 – Citizenship in Action*
Unit 2 – Leadership Theory & Application*
Unit 3 – Foundations For Success*
Unit 4 – Wellness, Fitness and First Aid*
Unit 5 – Geography, Map Skills & Environmental Awareness*
Unit 6 – Citizenship in American History & Government*
Physical Activity/Leader Assessment
Leadership Application
Cadet Challenge
Activities
Service Learning/Community Service*
Administration/Testing/Inspections
Additional Required Teaching & Leadership Hours*
State & JROTC Elective Hours
TOTAL HOURS

LET 1

LET 2

LET 4

TOTAL

2
12
36

18

18
30

LET 3

6
10
16

26
40
82
28
2
52

28
2
10/36*

16

20
10

20
10

20
10

20
10

80

40

10
24
0
50
180

10
24
0
50
180

10
24
0
50
180

10
24
34
50
180

40
96
34
200
720

NOTE: Use Category 2 Approved Electives (Table C) if your JROTC unit gets approval from Bde for alternate training specifically in remediation subjects. 25% reduction in hours does not apply to required lessons.

4-2 Accelerated Block Schedule
Students attend JROTC Monday through Friday for ~90 minutes each day. Students may only attend JROTC in the fall or spring or they may be able to attend JROTC everyday for ~90 minutes throughout all four years of high school. Instructors should follow Table A, above, for teaching the core classes, that is LET 1a, LET 2a, LET 3a, and LET 4a and Table B for teaching additional electives for LET 1b, LET 2b, LET 3b, and LET 4b. Schools on accelerated block that teach 90-minute period days M-F allowing students to remain in JROTC for the equivalent of eight years, are required to follow Table B (below) for LET 1a and 1b through LET 4a and 4b. Cadets in LET 3a and LET 3b will normally assume the leadership and command functions held at a LET 3 level in a traditional program. Cadets in LET 4a and LET 4b will normally assume the leadership and command functions held at the LET 4 level in a traditional program. Note, previous discussions of LET 5 – 8 were misleading and inadvertently caused entire LET levels to be taught in one semester. The suggested configuration is LET 1a and b, LET 2a and b, LET 3a and b, and LET 4a and b. If state or district codes indicate LET 5 – 8, the order taught should be LET 1a then LET 1b, LET 2a then LET 2b, LET 3a then LET 3b, and LET 4a then LET 4b.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

JROTC ACCELERATED PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION
TOTAL
LET 1b
LET 2 b
LET 3b
LET 4b
Table B: LET 1b – LET 4b (used in conjunction with Table A) Mandatory Training Hours **
Unit 1 – Citizenship in Action
11

11
11
11
44
Unit 2 – Leadership Theory and Application
11
11
11
11
44
Unit 3 – Foundations for Success
11
11
11
11
44
Unit 4 – Wellness, Fitness and First Aid
11
11
11
11
44
Unit 5 – Geography, Map Skills & Environmental Awareness
11
11
11
11
44
Unit 6 – Citizenship in American History and Government
11
11
11
11
44
Physical Activity/Leader Assessment

Leadership Application
20
20
20
20
80
Cadet Challenge
10
10
10
10
40
Activities
Service Learning/Community Service
10
10
10
10
40
Administration/Testing/Inspections
24
24
24
24
96
Approved Elective Hours
TOTAL HOURS
180
180
180
180
720
** These hours are interchangeable – all hours can be used in one or all subjects. The introduction is included in case upper level cadets are teaching LET 1.

Example of Accelerated Block Schedule: In the Accelerated Schedule, students complete four “year-long” courses that meet for extended time periods every day during a 90-day semester. For instance, LET 1 Cadets can take the entire year of LET 1 in the fall semester. Or, they can take the first half of LET 1 at the beginning or end of the fall semester, which is actually divided into two quarters, and the last half of LET 1 at the beginning or end of the spring semester, which is also divided into two quarters. Regardless of scheduling options it is not desirable for Cadets to complete the first year in one semester. The recommended course of action is to complete LET 1 core requirements in the first semester and complete LET 1 electives in the second semester and so forth through the entire program.

4-2Scheduling Options
Classes should be scheduled so that LET levels are taught individually; LET 1 is taught during a class period, LET 2 is taught during a class period and so on. . If logistics do not allow this configuration, or if classes are too small, the best way to combine Cadets in different levels is to schedule LET 1 and 4 in the same classroom allowing for leadership and peer teaching of LET 4 to LET 1 Cadets. LET 2 and LET 3 Cadets can be taught together on a two year cycle, as the LET 2 and LET 3 topics are taught to both combined groups over two years. LET 1 students can enter either LET 2 or 3 depending on where in the cycle they enter their second year, as LET 3 can be taken before LET 2 if needed. Regardless of which scheduling options instructors elect, by the fourth year all required lessons must be taught. Instructors should work collaboratively with other JROTC instructors and regular teachers to identify specific subject areas to teach.

NOTES FOR ALL SCHEDULES:
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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

a. There are specific lessons required in LET 1-4. Cadets will be expected to answer questions relating to those lessons according to the Master Training
Schedule or Curriculum Plan at the time of the formal inspection and off year visits. b. Instruction is provided in 90-minute lessons capable of being taught as two 45/50minute classroom sessions. c. Electives are a required component of the JROTC program and must be taught. Schools may not use these hours for other purposes. Electives are used to provide Cadets with additional opportunities outside the scope of the core requirements of the curriculum and are intended to supplement or reinforce the instruction or permit JROTC units to align their programs according to their desired academic focus. Approved electives are divided into the following three categories:

(1) Electives that have supporting curriculum materials developed. (2) Electives in which instructors must provide/develop their own curriculum materials. (3) Electives in which partial materials are available and/or can be ordered (such as Lion’s Quest). Their use is highly recommended to support/reinforce specific subjects. See Appendix for Material Contact Information.

d. LET 4 mandatory options (Additional Required Teaching and Leadership Hours- 34 hours) must be in categories identified on the LET 4 Master Training Schedule (MTS) or Curriculum Plan and come from electives underlined in Table C, Approved Electives. e. If JROTC units must make reductions in a particular year in order to add coursework to achieve core credit in another subject; to support a technical program; or remedial subjects, they may request permission for an exception to reduce hours but must complete lessons in the mandatory categories.

f. Conduct service-learning projects yearly based on knowledge/LET level of Cadets. g. If “Marksmanship” is an elective, U7-C1-L2, Firearm Safety and Safe Range Operation is a required lesson.
Note: Electives not pre-approved by Cadet Command must be approved before they can be taught in the JROTC curriculum. Watch the JROTC Portal for updates on approved electives.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

TABLE C: JROTC LET Program- Approved Elective Training
Category 1- Curriculum
Any material from
Marksmanship, Command
Materials Developed and
hardbound text, time from
and staff procedures,
found in Chapter
curriculum focused service
Extension of Mandatory
Descriptions in POI
learning activities
Subjects
Category 2- Instructors
Computer Training, Media
Physical Training, Water
Develop/Provide own
Communications
Safety, Hunter Safety,
Curriculum Materials
Wilderness Survival Safety
Category 3- Materials can
High School Financial
Lions-Quest, Intellern
be Ordered/Available
Planning Program, Chief
Materials, Teen eGetgoing
Highly Recommended
Justice
Web Based Activities
**See Appendix D for Contact Information for Category 3 Materials

Quantum Learning, Success
Profiler, Unlocking Your
Potential (UYP)
Admin/Supply Procedures,
Extension of Mandatory
Subjects
Written Communications for
Sergeants, You the People
and We the People

4-3 LET Training Units and Chapters
*Mandatory core lessons are shown in the units corresponding color; courses within that unit that can be substituted without prior approval to meet the needs of the school (remediation, test strategies, etc.) can be found as a colored font in that units corresponding unit color.

**Mandatory lessons that can be substituted with the approval of Brigades in Unit 6 have two asterisks behind their course title. In order to justify substitution, these hours need to be dedicated to remedial or other lessons that are value-added to the school’s annual yearly progress.

***Mandatory Core Service Learning Lessons (Unit 3-Chapter 8- Lessons 1-3; U3-C8L1, L2, L3) should be taught in every LET level in conjunction with Service Learning Projects in the 10 hours available in that category. See Appendix J for list of courses.

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix A: Core Lessons by LET
Unit 3 – Foundations for Success- Required for each LET
Lesson Number

Lesson Title

Hours

Chapter 8: Making a Difference with Service Learning
U3-C8-L1

Orientation to Service Learning ***

2

U3-C8-L2

Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project ***

2

U3-C8-L3

Project Reflection and Integration ***

2

Total Service Learning Core Hours 6

6

LET 1
LET 1
Lesson Number

Lesson Title

Hours

Unit 1: Chapter 1: Foundations of Army JROTC and Getting Involved U1-C1-L1

Army JROTC – The Making of a Better Citizen

U1-C1-L2

The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC

U1-C1-L3

Moving Up in Army JROTC – Rank and Structure

U1-C1-L4

The Signs of Success

U1-C1-L5

Your Personal Appearance and Uniform

U1-C1-L6

The Stars and Stripes

U1-C1-L7

Proudly We Sing – The National Anthem

U1-C1-L8

American Military Traditions, Customs, and Courtesies

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

Unit 2: Chapter 1: Being a Leader

U2-C1-L1
U2-C1-L2
U2-C1-L3
U2-C1-L4
U2-C1-L5

Leadership Defined

2

Leadership Reshuffled

2

Leadership from the Inside Out

2

Principles and Leadership

2

Sexual Harassment/Assault

4

Unit 2: Chapter 2: Leadership Skills
U2-C2-L1

Steps from the Past
U2-C2-L2
Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill

2

U2-C2-L3

Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge

2

U2-C2-L4

Stationary Movements

2

U2-C2-L5

Steps and Marching

2

U2-C2-L9

Squad Drill

2

2

Unit 3: Chapter 1: Know Yourself – Socrates
U3-C1-L1
U3-C1-L2

Self Awareness

2

Appreciating Diversity through Winning Colors

2

U3-C1-L3

Personal Growth Plan

2

U3-C1-L4

Becoming an Active Learner

2

U3-C1-L5

Pathways to Success (QBOL)

2

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Unit 3: Chapter 2: Learning to Learn
U3-C2-L1

Brain Structure and Function

2

U3-C2-L2

Left Brain/Right Brain

2

U3-C2-L3

Learning Style and Processing Preferences

2

U3-C2-L4

Multiple Intelligences

2

Unit 3: Chapter 3: Study Skills
U3-C3-L1

Thinking Maps

2

U3-C3-L2

Reading For Meaning

2

U3-C3-L3

Study Habits that Work for You

2

Unit 3: Chapter 4: Communication Skills
U3-C4-L1

The Communication Process

2

U3-C4-L2

Becoming a Better Listener

2

U3-C4-L3

Communicating in Groups

2

Unit 3: Chapter 5: Conflict Resolution
U3-C5-L1

Causes of Conflict

2

U3-C5-L2

Conflict Resolution Techniques [Just Two Days]

2

Unit 3: Chapter 11: NEFE High School Financial Planning Program U3-C11-L1

NEFE Introduction: Setting Financial Goals

Total LET 1Hours

2
66

LET 2
LET 2
Lesson Number

Lesson Title

Hours

Unit 4: Chapter 1: Achieving a Healthy Lifestyle
U4-C1-L1

Choosing the Right Exercise Program for You

U4-C1-L2

Cadet Challenge (62 units)

U4-C1-L3

You Are What You Eat

U4-C1-L4

Nutrition – Nourishing Your Body

U4-C1-L5

At Risk – Suicide Awareness and Prevention

U4-C1-L6

Controlling Fat

U4-C1-L7

Taking Care of Yourself

U4-C1-L8

Understanding and Controlling Stress

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Unit 4: Chapter 2: First Aid for Emergency and Non-Emergency Situations U4-C2-L1

The Need for First Aid/Your Response

2

U4-C2-L2

The First Life-Saving Steps

2

U4-C2-L3

Controlling Bleeding

2

U4-C2-L4

Treating for Shock and Immobilizing Fractures

2

U4-C2-L5

First Aid for Burns

2

U4-C2-L6

First Aid for Poisons, Wounds, and Bruises

2

U4-C2-L7

Heat Injuries

2

U4-C2-L8

Cold Weather Injuries

2

U4-C2-L9

Bites, Stings, and Poisonous Hazards

2

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Unit 4: Chapter 3: Drug Awareness
U4-C3-L1

Use & Effect of Drugs, Alcohol, and Substances

4

U4-C3-L2

Critical Decisions about Substances [Interactive Nights Out]

2

Unit 5: Chapter 1: Map Skills
U5-C1-L1

The Globe: An Overview

2

U5-C1-L2

Introduction to Maps

2

U5-C1-L3

Introduction to Topographic Maps

2

U5-C1-L4

Grid Reference System

2

U5-C1-L5

Contours and Landforms

2

U5-C1-L6

Determining Distance

2

U5-C1-L7

Determining Direction

2

U5-C1-L8

Converting the Grid-Magnetic Angle

2

U5-C1-L9

Determining Location

2

U5-C1-L10

Orienteering

2

U5-C1-L11

Air Navigation

2

Unit 5: Chapter 2: Exploring the World
U5-C2-L1

Before You Get Started

2

U5-C2-L2

North America–From Tundra to Tropics

2

U5-C2-L3

South America–Through the Tropics Toward Antarctica

2

U5-C2-L4

Europe–The Peninsular Continent

2

U5-C2-L5

Asia–The Largest, Most Populous continent

2

U5-C2-L6

Africa–The Plateau Continent

2

U5-C2-L7

Australia and the Rest of Oceania

2

Unit 5: Chapter 3: Environmental Awareness
U5-C3-L1

Local Environmental Issues

2

U5-C3-L2

Global Environmental Issues

2

Unit 6: Chapter 1: You the People – Citizenship Skills
U6-C1-L1

The Preamble*

2

U6-C1-L2

Citizenship Skills*

2

U6-C1-L3

Small Group Meetings*

2

U6-C1-L4

Representative Group Session*

2

U6-C1-L5

Introduction to Chief Justice*

2

Chapter 2: Foundations of the American Political System [We The People -Unit 1] U6-C2-L1

Our Natural Rights*

2

U6-C2-L2

Developing Republican Government*

2

U6-C2-L3

British Origins of American Constitutionalism*

2

U6-C2-L4

Colonial Government-Basic Rights & Constitutional Government*

2

U6-C2-L5

State Constitutions*

2

Chapter 3: Creating the Constitution [We The People – Unit 2] U6-C3-L1

Articles of confederation 1781*

2

U6-C3-L2

Creating Our Constitution*

2

24

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

U6-C3-L3

Balancing Power*

2

U6-C3-L4

The Debate Over the Constitution

2

Unit 6: Chapter 4: Shaping American Institutions and Practices [We The People – Unit 3] U6-C4-L1

Constitution Used to Organize New Government

2

U6-C4-L2

Bill of Rights

2

U6-C4-L3

Rise of Political Parties

2

U6-C4-L4

Judicial Review

2

U6-C4-L5

Division of Power

2

Unit 6: Chapter 5: Bill of Rights Developed and Expanded [We The People – Unit 4] U6-C5-L1

Constitutional Issues and Civil War

2

U6-C5-L2

Fourteenth Amendment

2

U6-C5-L3

Civil Rights Movement

2

U6-C5-L4

Right to Vote

2

U6-C5-L5

Using the Law to Correct Injustice

2

Chapter 6: The Bill of Rights [We The People – Unit 5]
U6-C6-L1

First Amendment and Freedom of Religion

2

U6-C6-L2

First Amendment and Freedom of Expression

2

U6-C6-L3

First Amendment and Freedom of Assembly

2

U6-C6-L4

Procedural Due Process

2

U6-C6-L5

Protection Against Unreasonable Law Enforcement

2

U6-C6-L6

Protection of Rights Within the Judicial System*

2

U6-C6-L7

Military Justice System*

2

Unit 6: Chapter 7: Citizen Roles in American Democracy [We The People – Unit 6] U6-C7-L1

Roles of Citizens

2

U6-C7-L2

New Citizenship and Constitutional Issues

2

U6-C7-L3

Constitutionalism and other Countries

2

U6-C7-L4

Defending Fundamental Principles

Total LET 2 Hours

66

LET 3
LET 3
Lesson Number

Lesson Title

Hours

Unit 1: Chapter 1: Foundations of Army JROTC and Getting Involved U1-C1-L9

Basic Command and Staff Principles

2

Unit 2: Chapter 3: Leadership Planning
U2-C3-L1

Development

2

U2-C3-L2

Goal Setting

2

Unit 2: Chapter 4: Leadership Strategies
2

U2-C4-L1

Celebrating Differences – Culture and Individual Diversity

U2-C4-L2

Performance Indicators

2

U2-C4-L3

Negotiating

2

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Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

U2-C4-L4

Decision Making and Problem Solving

2

U2-C4-L5

Leading Meetings

2

U2-C4-L6

Supervising

2

U2-C4-L7

Team Development

2

U2-C4-L8

Project Management

2

U2-C4-L9

Mentoring

2

Unit 2: Chapter 5: Leading Others
U2-C5-L1

Platoon Drill

2

U2-C5-L2

Taking Charge–Knowing Your Responsibilities as a Leader

2

U2-C5-L3

Company Formations and Movement

2

U2-C5-L4

Forming, Inspecting, and Dismissing the Battalion

2

U2-C5-L5

Review of Drill Procedures

2

U2-C5-L6

Stationary Movements with the M-1903 Rifle

2

U2-C5-L7

Stationary Movements with the M1 Rifle

2

U2-C5-L8

The Saber and the Scabbard

2

Unit 3: Chapter 6: Presenting Skills
U3-C6-L1

Becoming a Better Writer

2

U3-C6-L2

Creating Better Speeches

2

U3-C6-L3

Becoming a Better Speaker

2

Unit 3: Chapter 7: Managing Conflict
U3-C7-L1

Managing Anger [Emotional Intelligence Program]

2

U3-C7-L2

Conflict Resolution and Diversity [Hate Comes Home]

2

U3-C7-L3

Conflict Mediation

2

U3-C7-L4

Violence Prevention [Violence Prevention Profiler] –

2

Unit 3: Chapter 9: Career Planning
U3-C9-L1

Career Exploration Strategy

2

U3-C9-L2

Career Development Portfolio

2

U3-C9-L3

Military Career Opportunities

2

U3-C9-L4

College Preparation

2

Unit 3: Chapter 10: Planning Skills and Social Responsibility U3-C10-L1

Making the Right Choices

2

U3-C10-L2

Goals and Goal Setting

2

U3-C10-L3

Time Management

2

U3-C10-L4

Cadet Etiquette Guide

2

Unit 3: Chapter 11: NEFE High School Financial Planning Program U3-C11-L2

NEFE Unit 1 – Financial Planning: Your Road Map

2

U3-C11-L3

NEFE Unit 3 – Budgeting: Making the Most of Your Money

2

U3-C11-L4

NEFE Unit 4 – Investing: Making Your Money Work For You

2

Unit 3: Chapter 8: Critical Thinking in Citizenship
U6-C8-L1

Leadership Choices, Decisions, and Consequences

2

U6-C8-L2

Ethical Choices, Decisions, & Consequences

2

26

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

U6-C8-L3

Global Citizenship Choices, Decisions, & Consequences

2

U6-C8-L4

Historical Timeline: Choices, Decisions, & Consequences

2

Total LET 3 Hours

66

LET 4
LET 4
Lesson Number

Lesson Title

Hours

Unit 1: Chapter 2: Service to the Nation
U1-C2-L1

The Department of Defense

U1-C2-L2

The Active Army

U1-C2-L3

The Army Reserve Components

U1-C2-L4

The U.S. Navy

U1-C2-L5

The U.S. Air Force

U1-C2-L6

The U.S. Marine Corps

U1-C2-L7

The U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Merchant Marine

U1-C2-L8

The Peace Corps

U1-C2-L9

The AmeriCorps

2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2

Chapter 6: Leadership Principles
U2-C6-L1

Power Bases and Influence

2

U2-C6-L2

Styles of Leadership

2

U2-C6-L3

Management Skills

2

U2-C6-L4

Communication

2

U2-C6-L5

Motivation

2

Chapter 11: NEFE High School Financial Planning Program
U3-C11-L5

NEFE Unit 5 – Good Debt, Bad Debt: Using Credit Wisely

U3-C11-L6

NEFE Unit 6 – Insurance: Protecting What You Have

2
2

Chapter 12: Teaching Skills
U3-C12-L1

Preparing to Teach – (PE)

2

U3-C12-L2

Using and Developing Lesson Plans – (PE)

2

U3-C12-L3

Delivering Instruction – (PE)

2

U3-C12-L4

Use Variety in Your Lesson Plan – (PE)

2

U3-C12-L5

Thinking Maps and Graphic Organizers

2

U3-C12-L6

Using Feedback in the Classroom

2

Total LET 4 Hours

66

27

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix B: Health Lessons Recommended Sequence (click on link) To Find Aligned National Standards for JROTC Health Substitutions: Health_Lessons_Linked_to_NHES.pdf

HEALTH Lessons Recommended Sequence
U3-C1-L5
U4-C1-L3
U4-C1-L4
U4-C1-L6
U4-C1-L7

U2-C1-L5
U2-C3-L2
U4-C1-L8
U4-C3-L1
U4-C3-L2
U3-C1-L1
U3-C1-L2
U2-C4-L1
U3-C5-L1
U3-C5-L2
U3-C7-L2
U3-C7-L3
U3-C7-L4
U3-C4-L1
U3-C4-L2
U3-C4-L3
U2-C6-L4
U2-C6-L5
U2-C4-L4
U2-C4-L3
U2-C4-L2
U2-C4-L9
U2-C6-L1
U4-C1-L5
U4-C2-L1
U4-C2-L2
U4-C2-L3
U4-C2-L4
U4-C2-L5
U4-C2-L6
U4-C2-L7
U4-C2-L8
U4-C2-L9
U3-C8-L1
U3-C8-L2

U3-C8-L3

Pathway to Success [Quarterbacks of Life]
The Components of Whole Health
Nutrition – You Are What You Eat
Controlling Fat
Taking Care of Yourself
Sexual Harrassment/Assault
Goal Setting (w/QBOL SS1)
Understanding and Controlling Stress
Use & Effect of Drugs, Alcohol, and Substances
Critical Decisions about Substances [Interactive Nights Out] Self Awareness (with QBOL SS2)
Appreciating Diversity through Winning Colors
Celebrating Differences – Culture and Individual Diversity
Causes of Conflict
Conflict Resolution Techniques [Just Two Days]
Conflict Resolution and Diversity [Hate Comes Home]
Conflict Mediation
Violence Prevention [Violence Prevention Profiler]
The Communication Process
Becoming a Better Listener
Communicating in Groups (with QBOL SS3)
Communication
Motivation
Decision Making and Problem Solving (w/QBOL SS4)
Negotiating
Performance Indicators
Mentoring
Power Bases and Influence
At Risk – Suicide Symptoms and Prevention (w/ QBOL SS5)
The Need for First Aid/Your Response
The First Life-Saving Steps
Controlling Bleeding
Treating for Shock and Immobilizing Fractures

First Aid for Burns
First Aid for Poisons, Wounds, and Bruises
Heat Injuries
Cold Weather Injuries
Bites, Stings, and Poisonous Hazards
Orientation to Service Learning* (BOTH)
Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project* (BOTH)
Project Reflection and Integration* (BOTH)

90
90
180
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
180
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90

90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90

3600 minutes = 72 contact hours/ With Service Learning 3870 minutes = 77 contact hours

28

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix C: PE Lessons Recommended Sequence (click on link)
To Find Aligned National Standards for JROTC PE Substitutions: PE_Lessons_Linked_to_NASPE.pdf

PE Lessons Recommended Sequence
U4-C1-L1
U2-C3-L1
U4-C1-L2
U2-C1-L1
U2-C1-L2
U2-C1-L3
U2-C1-L4

U2-C2-L1
U2-C2-L2
U2-C2-L3
U2-C2-L4
U2-C2-L5
U2-C2-L6
U2-C5-L1
U2-C5-L2
U2-C5-L3
U2-C5-L4
U2-C6-L2
U2-C6-L3
U3-C12-L1
U3-C12-L2
U3-C12-L3
U3-C12-L4
U3-C8-L1
U3-C8-L2
U3-C8-L3

Choosing the Right Exercise Program for You
Development
Cadet Challenge (62 units)
Leadership Defined
Leadership Reshuffled
Leadership from the Inside Out
Principles and Leadership
Steps from the Past
Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill
Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge
Stationary Movements
Steps and Marching
Squad Drill
Platoon Drill
Taking Charge–Knowing Your Responsibilities as a Leader

Company Formations and Movement
Forming, Inspecting, and Dismissing the Battalion
Styles of Leadership
Management Skills
Preparing to Teach
Using and Developing Lesson Plans
Delivering Instruction
Use Variety in Your Lesson Plan
Orientation to Service Learning* (BOTH)
Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project* (BOTH)
Project Reflection and Integration* (BOTH)

180
180
1400
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90

90
90
90

3560 minutes = 71 contact hours/ With Service Learning 3830 minutes = 77 contact hours

29

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix D: Contact Information for Table C
Contact Information for Table C; Category 3 Curriculum Materials Teen eGetgoing web based activities
High School Financial Planning Program
(303-224-3510 – no cost for this program)
Chief Justice (415-883-3530)
You the People and We the People
Written Communications for Sergeants
(703-680-7488 or mailto:[email protected] )
IntelliLearn Materials (843-686-4050)

30

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix E: Table C: JROTC Leadership Education and Training Program- Approved Elective Training
TABLE C: JROTC LET- Approved Elective Training
Category 1- Curriculum
Any material from
Marksmanship, Command
Materials Developed and
hardbound text, time from
and staff procedures,

found in Chapter
curriculum focused service
Extension of Mandatory
Descriptions in POI
learning activities
Subjects
Category 2- Instructors
Computer Training, Media
Physical Training, Water
Develop/Provide own
Communications,
Safety, Hunter Safety,
Curriculum Materials
Wilderness Survival Safety
Category 3- Materials can
High School Financial
Lions-Quest, Intellern
be Ordered/Available
Planning Program, Chief
Materials, Teen eGetgoing
Highly Recommended
Justice
Web Based Activities
**See Appendix D for Contact Information for Category 3 Materials

Quantum Learning, Success
Profiler, Unlocking Your
Potential (UYP)
Admin/Supply Procedures,
Extension of Mandatory
Subjects
Written Communications for
Sergeants , You the People
and We the People

31

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix F: Teen Cert Lessons
U2C4L3: Negotiating
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 7 – Disaster Psychology and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. U2C4L4: Decision-Making and Problem Solving. This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 2 – Fire Safety and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U2C6L2: Styles of Leadership
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 1 Disaster Preparedness and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U2C6L3: Management Skills
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 1 Disaster Preparedness and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U2C6L4: Communication

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 6 – CERT Organization and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. U2C6L5: Motivation

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 5 – Light Search and Rescue Operations and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

32

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

U3C4L3: Communicating in Groups
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 8 – Terrorism and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U3C5L1: Causes of Conflict
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 8 – Terrorism and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals

U3C7L2: Conflict Resolution

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 8 – Terrorism and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U3C7L3: Conflict Mediation
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 7 – Disaster Psychology and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U3C7L4: Violence Prevention
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 8 – Terrorism and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U3C8L1: Orientation to Service Learning
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 9 – Review and Disaster Simulation and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. U3C8L2: Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 9 – Review and Disaster Simulation and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT

33

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. U3C8L3: Project Reflection and Integration

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 9 – Review and Disaster Simulation and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. U4C1L7: Taking Care of Yourself

This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 1 Disaster Preparedness and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U4C1L5: At Risk – Suicide Symptoms and Prevention
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 7 – Disaster Psychology and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

U4C1L8: Understanding and Controlling Stress
This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 7 – Disaster Psychology and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT
Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals. To all First Aid lessons U4C2L1 – 9 This JROTC lesson serves as a preparatory lesson for TEEN CERT Unit 3 – Disaster Medical Operations: Part 1 and Unit 4 – Disaster Medical Operations: Part 2 and materials for this lesson are found in the TEEN CERT Resources Folder. The entire contents of the TEEN CERT curriculum before implementation. Teen CERT lessons can be implemented as JROTC elective hours of instruction as agreed upon by the school and/or JROTC education professionals.

34

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

Appendix G: McREL Standards by LET
For additional information regarding McREL Standards click this link: http://www.mcrel.org/compendium/browse.asp
LET 1 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary
Linked McREL Standards
CIVICS:
C9. Understands the importance of Americans sharing and supporting certain values, beliefs, and principles of American constitutional democracy
LANGUAGE ARTS:
LA1. Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process LA4. Gathers and uses information for research purposes
LA5. Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process LA7. Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of informational texts
LA8. Uses listening and speaking strategies for different purposes LIFE SKILLS–LIFE WORK:
LW2. Uses various information sources, including those of a technical nature, to accomplish specific tasks
LW3. Manages money effectively
LW5. Makes general preparation for entering the work force

LW7. Displays reliability and a basic work ethic
LW8. Operates effectively within organizations
LIFE SKILLS–SELF REGULATION:
SR1. Sets and manages goals
SR2. Performs self-appraisal
SR4. Demonstrates perseverance
SR5. Maintains a healthy self-concept
LIFE SKILLS–THINKING AND REASONING:
TR1. Understands and applies the basic principles of presenting an argument
TR3. Effectively uses mental processes that are based on identifying similarities and differences
TR6. Applies decision-making techniques
LIFE SKILLS–WORKING WITH OTHERS:
WO1. Contributes to the overall effort of a group
WO2. Uses conflict-resolution techniques
WO3. Works well with diverse individuals and in diverse situations WO4. Displays effective interpersonal communication skills
WO5. Demonstrates leadership skills
LET 2 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary
Linked Program Outcomes

35

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program












Promote wellness through nutrition, physical fitness and substance abuse prevention
Develop leadership skills
Build effective relationships with peers, co-workers, and the community Apply physical and political geography to building global awareness Correlate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship to the purposes of U.S. government

Relate events in U.S. history to choices and responsibilities Americans have today
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world
Treat self and others with respect
Apply critical thinking techniques

Linked McREL Standards
CIVICS
C1. Understands ideas about civic life, politics, and government C2. Understands the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited governments
C3. Understands the sources, purposes, and functions of law, and the importance of the rule of law for the protection of individual rights and the common good
C4. Understands the concept of a constitution, the various purposes that constitutions serve, and the conditions that contribute to the establishment and maintenance of constitutional government
C8. Understands the central ideas of American constitutional government and how this form of government has shaped the character of American society

C9. Understands the importance of Americans sharing and supporting certain values, beliefs, and principles of American constitutional democracy
C11. Understands the role of diversity in American life and the importance of shared values, political beliefs, and civic beliefs in an increasingly diverse American society
C12. Understands the relationships among liberalism, republicanism, and American constitutional democracy
C14. Understands issues concerning the disparities between ideals and reality in American political and social life
C15. Understands how the United States Constitution grants and distributes power and responsibilities to national and state government and how it seeks to prevent the abuse of power

36

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

C18. Understands the role and importance of law in the American constitutional system and issues regarding the judicial protection of individual rights
C26. Understands issues regarding the proper scope and limits of rights and the relationships among personal, political, and economic rights C28. Understands how participation in civic and political life can help citizens attain individual and public goals

GEOGRAPHY
G1. Understands the characteristics and uses of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
G2. Knows the location of places, geographic features, and patterns of the environment
G4. Understands the physical and human characteristics of place G5. Understands the concept of regions
G14. Understands how human actions modify the physical environment G15. Understands how physical systems affect human systems
G18. Understands global development and environmental issues HEALTH

H1. Knows the availability and effective use of health services, products, and information
H2. Knows environmental and external factors that affect individual and community health
H3. Understands the relationship of family health to individual health H4. Knows how to maintain mental and emotional health
H6. Understands essential concepts about nutrition and diet
H7. Knows how to maintain and promote personal health
H8. Knows essential concepts about the prevention and control of disease H9. Understands aspects of substance use and abuse
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE3. Understands the benefits and costs associated with participation in physical activity
PE4. Understands how to monitor and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness
US HISTORY
USH8. Understands the institutions and practices of government created during the Revolution and how these elements were revised between 1787 and 1815 to create the foundation of the American political system based on the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights

USH12. Understands the sources and character of cultural, religious, and social reform movements in the antebellum period
USH13. Understands the causes of the Civil War
USH15. Understands how various reconstruction plans succeeded or failed
USH29. Understands the struggle for racial and gender equality and for the extension of civil liberties
LIFE SKILLS–LIFE WORK

37

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

LW1. Makes effective use of basic tools
LW2. Uses various information sources, including those of a technical nature,
to accomplish specific tasks
LW8. Operates effectively within organizations
LIFE SKILLS–SELF REGULATIONS
SR1. Sets and manages goals
SR2. Performs self-appraisal
SR4. Demonstrates perseverance
LIFE SKILLS–THINKING AND REASONING
TR1. Understands and applies the basic principles of presenting an argument
TR3. Effectively uses mental processes that are based on identifying similarities and differences
TR4. Understands and applies basic principles of hypothesis testing and scientific inquiry
TR5. Applies basic trouble-shooting and problem-solving techniques TR6. Applies decision-making techniques
LIFE SKILLS–WORKING WITH OTHERS
WO1. Contributes to the overall effort of a group
WO3. Works well with diverse individuals and in diverse situations WO4. Displays effective interpersonal communication skills
WO5. Demonstrates leadership skills
LET 3 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary
Linked Program Outcomes
• Maximize potential for success through learning and self-management • Develop leadership skills
• Build effective relationships with peers, co-workers, and the community • G. Relate events in U.S. history to choices and responsibilities Americans have today
Linked Core Abilities
• Build your capacity for life-long learning
• Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques • Take responsibility for your actions and choices
• Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world
• Treat self and others with respect
• Apply critical thinking techniques
Linked McREL Standards

CIVICS
C23. Understands the impact of significant political and nonpolitical developments on the United States and other nations

38

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

C27. Understands how certain character traits enhance citizens’ ability to fulfill personal and civic responsibilities
C29. Understands the importance of political leadership, public service, and a knowledgeable citizenry in American constitutional democracy LANGUAGE ARTS
LA1. Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process LA3. Uses grammatical and mechanical conventions in written
compositions
LA2. Uses the stylistic and rhetorical aspects of writing
LA8. Uses listening and speaking strategies for different purposes LA9. Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE1. Uses a variety of basic and advanced movement forms
PE3. Understands the benefits and costs associated with participation in physical activity
PE5. Understands the social and personal responsibility associated with participation in physical activity
LIFE SKILLS–LIFE WORK
LW2. Uses various information sources, including those of a technical nature, to accomplish specific tasks
LW3. Manages money effectively
LW4. Pursues specific jobs
LW5. Makes general preparation for entering the work force
LW6. Makes effective use of basic life skills
LW8. Operates effectively within organizations
LIFE SKILLS–SELF REGULATION
SR1. Sets and manages goals
SR2. Performs self-appraisal

SR3. Considers risks
SR4. Demonstrates perseverance
SR5. Maintains a healthy self-concept
SR6. Restrains impulsivity
LIFE SKILLS–THINKING AND REASONING
TR2. Understands and applies basic principles of logic and reasoning TR3. Effectively uses mental processes that are based on identifying similarities and differences
TR5. Applies basic trouble-shooting and problem-solving techniques TR6. Applies decision-making techniques
LIFE SKILLS–WORKING WITH OTHERS
WO1. Contributes to the overall effort of a group
WO2. Uses conflict-resolution techniques
WO3. Works well with diverse individuals and in diverse situations WO4. Displays effective interpersonal communication skills
WO5. Demonstrates leadership skills

39

Course Name: JROTC, A Character and Leadership Development Program

LET 4 Core Lessons – Outcome Summary
Linked McREL Standards
CIVICS
C8. Understands the central ideas of American constitutional government and how this form of government has shaped the character of American society
C16. Understands the major responsibilities of the national government for domestic and foreign policy, and understands how government is financed through taxation
LANGUAGE ARTS
LA1. Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process LA5. Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process LA7. Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of informational texts

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TOPICS IN THIS DOCUMENT
Course, Course credit, Education, Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Leadership, Learning, Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Skill
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