Nutrasweet and Aspartame: The Damage of Dieting Annotated Bibliography - Health Essay Example

Should You Sour on Aspartame? - Nutrasweet and Aspartame: The Damage of Dieting Annotated Bibliography introduction?? Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, 15260143, Sep2007, Vol. 25, Issue 7. Academic Search Premier.

The authors and researchers at Tufts University use the research and data collected by a European study to investigate the health concerns surrounding aspartame and artificial sweeteners.  The European study was conducted by the European Ramazzini Foundation or the ERF which exposes rats to aspartame over time and in various concentration.  The ERF found that rats that were exposed were more likely to have lymphoma, leukemia, and in some cases Parkinson’s disease.  However, rats with the onset of these diseases were exposed to a 100 times the amount of aspartame that humans would regularly encounter. The US Food and Drug Administration or FDA supports the results they claim that it does show a health risk to humans and therefore refused to warn the public that exposure to aspartame can

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lead to major health concerns.  This research is relevant because aspartame is not as safe as the public would believe and the amount of artificial sweeteners must be tracked and analysis to see the longterm effects of these chemicals on the human body.  (Word Count 191).

Stanner, S. “Aspartame in the News Again.” Nutrition Bulletin 30(2005): 309-310.

An Italian study has alleged that aspartame may be a contributing factor to cancer found in rats.  Researchers used rats because they most parallel the human in body systems and DNA while still be economical and efficient.  While this study was published in a peer review journal its research has caused attention to the be placed around artificial sweeteners like Nutrasweet.  These results combined with the results of the ERF have sparked research to be performed a number of major research institutions.  In addition, these research has lead to the labels being displayed on cans of soda and all food containing aspartame and its derivatives.  The national health concern and warnings should evidence that these chemicals pose a potential health concern and long term risk to the general public.This labeling system as well as adamant artificial sweetener companies which claim that these chemicals are not a risk parallel the reaction of tobacco companies 50 years ago.  (Word Count 171).

Simon, Jason. “Aspartame Reactions: A Hidden Epidemic.” The Ecologist 101(2005): 047-049.

This article overviews the general chemical composition of aspartame as well as addressing concerns of the the numerous health problems that has been linked to aspartame.  Dr. HJ Roberts, the scientist who originally supported the FDA’s decision that artificial sweeteners are not a risk to the public.  However,  Roberts believes differently now after surveying the vast research that has been done on

the topic.  He believes, that like himself, almost all physicians encounter the effects of aspartame in their patients everyday.  He believes that it is the role of the family doctor to warn and educate their patients.  Roberts also believes that individuals are misdiagnosed with major diseases like Parkinson’s or Multiple Sclerosis when in reality they should just stop consuming foods with aspartame.   Dr. Roberts is just one of the the many physicians which have major concerns about this chemicals in the diets of everyday Americans. (Word Count 160).

De la Hunty, A. “A Review of the effectiveness of Aspartame in Helping with Weight Control.” Nutrition Bulletin 31(2006): 115-128.

De la Hunty and associates have studied the use of aspartame over several years as a method of weight control.  He is a leading researcher within his field and his research has been used to support many of the weight loss programs popular today.  De la Hunty reviews the new trend in nutrition to use artificial sweeteners to help control and maintain weight.  De la Hunty asserts that body weight is reduced when subjects consumed foods that were sweeteners with artificial chemicals instead of naturally occurring sucrose.  The article makes it a point to show that most Americans do not realize the amount of aspartame they are consuming (already) everyday.  In some cases, there was a 15% offset of the amount of artificial sweeteners that individuals were consuming versus what they thought they were consuming.  This is strikingly different then the reports by the FDA which claim that the typical individuals consumes so little aspartame that there is no need for concern. (Word Count 184).

Kenner, Arthur. “Ecologist Online Debate.” The Ecologist 101(2005): 007.

The Ecologist has been a leader and taken a hard stance against chemical additives and their place in the American diet.  This update on the aspartame debate centers around the growing concern that the general public has.  While many individuals agree with the claims that aspartame can cause health problems they are unsure how to proceed in terms of persuading the FDA to make a public announcement and declare simply that aspartame is toxic and consumption should at least be monitored and reduced.  The Ecologist urges readers who are concerned to seek out their state representatives and ask them to take a harder stance on toxins being allowed in products which are labeled safe by the FDA.  In addition, individuals with concerns should simply be more aware of what they are consuming and restrict their diets to adhere to a low artificial sweeteners diet. (Word Count 154).

Cotton, Karen. “Binging on Nutrasweet.” Eating Disorders 9(2002): 8.

Karen Cotton the editorial editor at Eating Disorders Journal fields a question from a concerned friend asking about her friend who has an eating disorder and

the topic.  He believes, that like himself, almost all physicians encounter the effects of aspartame in their patients everyday.  He believes that it is the role of the family doctor to warn and educate their patients.  Roberts also believes that individuals are misdiagnosed with major diseases like Parkinson’s or Multiple Sclerosis when in reality they should just stop consuming foods with aspartame.   Dr. Roberts is just one of the the many physicians which have major concerns about this chemicals in the diets of everyday Americans. (Word Count 160).

De la Hunty, A. “A Review of the effectiveness of Aspartame in Helping with Weight Control.” Nutrition Bulletin 31(2006): 115-128.

De la Hunty and associates have studied the use of aspartame over several years as a method of weight control.  He is a leading researcher within his field and his research has been used to support many of the weight loss programs popular today.  De la Hunty reviews the new trend in nutrition to use artificial sweeteners to help control and maintain weight.  De la Hunty asserts that body weight is reduced when subjects consumed foods that were sweeteners with artificial chemicals instead of naturally occurring sucrose.  The article makes it a point to show that most Americans do not realize the amount of aspartame they are consuming (already) everyday.  In some cases, there was a 15% offset of the amount of artificial sweeteners that individuals were consuming versus what they thought they were consuming.  This is strikingly different then the reports by the FDA which claim that the typical individuals consumes so little aspartame that there is no need for concern. (Word Count 184).

Kenner, Arthur. “Ecologist Online Debate.” The Ecologist 101(2005): 007.

The Ecologist has been a leader and taken a hard stance against chemical additives and their place in the American diet.  This update on the aspartame debate centers around the growing concern that the general public has.  While many individuals agree with the claims that aspartame can cause health problems they are unsure how to proceed in terms of persuading the FDA to make a public announcement and declare simply that aspartame is toxic and consumption should at least be monitored and reduced.  The Ecologist urges readers who are concerned to seek out their state representatives and ask them to take a harder stance on toxins being allowed in products which are labeled safe by the FDA.  In addition, individuals with concerns should simply be more aware of what they are consuming and restrict their diets to adhere to a low artificial sweeteners diet. (Word Count 154).

Cotton, Karen. “Binging on Nutrasweet.” Eating Disorders 9(2002): 8.

and diseases in humans and rats.  He believes that the FDA approval of not just aspartame but approval in general is worthless.  Keelen asserts that aspartame is a toxins that is available on the grocery store and is a blatant disregard to the health of Americans.  It is extremely important that all products which contain aspartame should be labeled correctly.  This health scare is being compared to the health scare that surrounded tobacco years ago.  It is important that this particular chemical and the problems it could cause be brought to the public’s attention. (Word Count 150).

Thomas, Pat. “LIFE AFTER ASPARTAME.” The Ecologist 35(2005): 001-002.

Pat Thomas insists that sucralose passes through the body virtually intact, and that the tight molecular bond between the chlorine atoms and the sugar molecule results in a very stable and versatile product that is not metabolised in the body for calories. This doesn’t mean, however, that sucralose is not metabolised in the body at all, and critics like HJ Roberts argue that, during storage and in the body, sucralose breaks down into among other things 1,6 dichlorofructose, a chlorinated compound that has not been adequately tested in humans. (Word Count 140).

Abegaz, Eyassu G. “Aspartame Not Linked to Cancer.” Environmental Health Perspectives 115.1 (2007): 16+. Questia. 17 Oct. 2007.

After the publication of the ERF aspartame study (Soffritti et al. 2006), the European Commission asked the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to assess the ERF aspartame carcinogenicity study results as a matter of high priority following the publication (EFSA 2005). The EFSA’s Scientific Panel on Food Additives, Flavorings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC), an 18-member panel that consisted of independent regulatory scientists and toxicologists, assessed the ERF aspartame carcinogenicity study using not only the ERF publication but also more extensive primary data and reports provided by ERF. Concurrently, the U.K. Food Standards Agency requested the opinion of the U.K. Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and Environment (COC) on the quality, analysis, and interpretation of the results of the ERF aspartame carcinogenicity study. (Word Count 167).

Karen Cotton the editorial editor at Eating Disorders Journal fields a question from a concerned friend asking about her friend who has an eating disorder and

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