Position Paper- Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty in Russia

The Russian Federation confirms its position of principle in support of the efforts undertaken by the international community, including the UN, Conference on Disarmament and IAEA to fight terrorism and proliferation. Russia clearly understands that under today’s conditions the spread of nuclear weapons, together with missile vehicles of their’ delivery, would be fraught with generating strategic turmoil, Increased risk of regional conflicts and use of nuclear weapons.

Quite naturally, it is urgent to counteract such a course of events. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is the main factor allowing the community to hold back such a development of events, providing at the same time for the development of international cooperation in the sphere of peaceful use of nuclear energy. That is why Russia attaches great importance to the comprehensive and impartial consideration of the NPT functioning.

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Russia has completely fulfilled her obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty of unlimited duration (the INF Treaty), which entered into force on 1 June 1988. As a result, ground-based missiles of two classes – medium range (from 1,000 to 5,500 km) and shorter-range (from 500 to 1,000 km) missiles have been eliminated. Inspection activity under that Treaty was completed in May 2001.

At the same time also Russia continues reducing strategic offensive weapons. The period of reduction of strategic offensive weapons foreseen under the START I ended on December 5, 2001. According to the Treaty, the parties committed themselves to reduce the number of their strategic delivery systems seven years after its entry into force down to 1,600 units, and the re-entry vehicles [warheads] counted with them down to the level of 6,000 units to each of the parties.

Russia completely and ahead of the time-schedule fulfilled her obligations under the above mentioned reduction provisions and on the deadline date December 5, 2001 has actually lowered the number of her deployed strategic delivery systems (ICBM, SLBM and strategic bombers) down to 1,136 units, and the number of the re-entry vehicles accounted with them down to 5,518 units. As is well known, Russia has ratified the START II [Treaty] and as far back as summer 2000 delivered her draft START III to the United States.

We are convinced that under present conditions it is necessary to conclude a new legally binding treaty regarding further SOW [strategic offensive weapons] reductions, where… a new level of reduction down to 1,700-2,200 re-entry vehicles will be specified, to which Russia and the United States will come during [a] 10 year period. Russia has been prepared to agree to a lower level of reductions – down to 1,500 re-entry vehicles. It will also be necessary to underscore [that] there [is] an interrelation between strategic offensive weapons and defensive weapons.

We think it is important that such reductions are real and reliably monitored. At present, Russia and the United States are engaged in intensive negotiations on the elaboration of such a treaty, as well as a declaration on new strategic relations between both nations. The Russian Federation confirms its position of principle in support of the efforts undertaken by the international community, including the UN, Conference on Disarmament and IAEA to fight terrorism and proliferation.

Russia clearly understands that under today’s conditions the spread of nuclear weapons, together with missile vehicles of their’ delivery, would be fraught with generating strategic turmoil, Increased risk of regional conflicts and use of nuclear weapons. Quite naturally, it is urgent to counteract such a course of events. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is the main factor allowing the community to hold back such a development of events, providing at the same time for the development of international cooperation in the sphere of peaceful use of nuclear energy.

That is why Russia attaches great importance to the comprehensive and impartial consideration of the NPT functioning. Russia has completely fulfilled her obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty of unlimited duration (the INF Treaty), which entered into force on 1 June 1988. As a result, ground-based missiles of two classes – medium range (from 1,000 to 5,500 km) and shorter-range (from 500 to 1,000 km) missiles have been eliminated. Inspection activity under that Treaty was completed in May 2001.

At the same time also Russia continues reducing strategic offensive weapons. The period of reduction of strategic offensive weapons foreseen under the START I ended on December 5, 2001. According to the Treaty, the parties committed themselves to reduce the number of their strategic delivery systems seven years after its entry into force down to 1,600 units, and the re-entry vehicles [warheads] counted with them down to the level of 6,000 units to each of the parties.

Russia completely and ahead of the time-schedule fulfilled her obligations under the above mentioned reduction provisions and on the deadline date December 5, 2001 has actually lowered the number of her deployed strategic delivery systems (ICBM, SLBM and strategic bombers) down to 1,136 units, and the number of the re-entry vehicles accounted with them down to 5,518 units. As is well known, Russia has ratified the START II [Treaty] and as far back as summer 2000 delivered her draft START III to the United States.

We are convinced that under present conditions it is necessary to conclude a new legally binding treaty regarding further SOW [strategic offensive weapons] reductions, where… a new level of reduction down to 1,700-2,200 re-entry vehicles will be specified, to which Russia and the United States will come during [a] 10 year period. Russia has been prepared to agree to a lower level of reductions – down to 1,500 re-entry vehicles.

It will also be necessary to underscore [that] there [is] an interrelation between strategic offensive weapons and defensive weapons. We think it is important that such reductions are real and reliably monitored. At present, Russia and the United States are engaged in intensive negotiations on the elaboration of such a treaty, as well as a declaration on new strategic relations between both nations.

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Position Paper- Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty in Russia. (2017, Jan 29). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/position-paper-nuclear-non-proliferation-treaty-in-russia/