Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: PTSD - Stress Essay Example

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, also known as PTSD, refers to deep emotional wounds - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: PTSD introduction. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is an anxiety disorder characterized by haunting memories, nightmares, social withdrawal, jumpy anxiety, and insomnia that lingers for four weeks or more after a traumatic experience (Myers, 2011). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder categorizes it self as one of the anxiety disorders. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder results from being exposed to an event, or even a series of events, that is very over whelming and stressful; like war, rape or abuse (Schiraldi, 2000).

Normal people give normal responses to an abnormal situation (Schiraldi, 2000). They say that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a normal response to an abnormal situation because the condition is understandable and what happened has overwhelmed normal coping responses (Schiraldi, 2000). There are a wide variety of events that happen in life, which can trigger Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. All of the events fall under three categories.

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These three categories include; Intentional Human, which is the most difficult to recover from, followed by Unintentional Human, then Acts of Nature, which is the least complex to deal with (Beckner & Arden, 2008). Some examples of Intentional Human events are: Combat War, Sexual Abuse, Physical Abuse, Emotional Abuse, Torture, Criminal Assault, Hostage, Terrorism, Witnessing a Homicide, Kidnapping and many more (Beckner & Arden, 2008). Some Unintentional Human events are: Fires, Burns, Explosions, Vehicle Accidents, Plane Crashes, Nuclear Disasters, Surgical Damage to Body/Loss of Body Part, and lots more (Beckner & Arden, 2008).

Acts of Nature events include: Hurricanes, Tornados, Floods, Typhoons, Earthquakes, Avalanches, Fires, Droughts, Attacked by an Animal (such as a Lion), Sudden Life-Threatening Illness, Volcanic Eruptions, Drought, Sudden Death (loss of unborn child), and many more (Beckner & Arden, 2008). Every case of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is not the same. There are many different acts of display and feelings of emotion that one can use if they had Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Some people that have the Post Traumatic Stress Disorder may feel frightened, sad, anxious, or even disconnected; while other victims feel hat they are constantly in danger, afraid, aggressive, and have those painful memories that keep replaying in their minds, which mess with their everyday lives (England, 2009). Some victims may display self destructive behavior like drinking more constantly, smoking tobacco, and some may even turn to drugs such as heroin, methamphetamine, or marijuana (England, 2009). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder victims sometimes hear or see things that are really not there. They avoid activities that they once enjoyed with a passion (England, 2009).

Memory problems and concentrating are also difficulties of symptoms that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder victims display. All of the symptoms that someone would display if they had Post Traumatic Stress Disorder would not always be shown (Beckner & Arden, 2008). Symptoms come and go; some days they get a lot of symptoms that happen and other days they only experience a few minor symptoms, or even none at all (England, 2009). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder isn’t racist or picky in any way. Any person can have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

It doesn’t matter how old or young you are, it doesn’t matter what color you are. If you have been through a tragic point in your life where you feel like you can’t move on anymore and your life is no longer enjoyable because of experiencing an event, or even series of events that was very over whelming and stressful, you may have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Flannery, 1997). Women are more likely to report, if asked, that they have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, although, both men and women report having Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (England, 2009).

There is usually a treatment for everything. Sometimes it works and other times treatments does not work. For Post Traumatic Stress Disorder you should always go out and find some treatment. If Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is left untreated, it will never go away. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder also puts the patient at a high risk of drug use, alcohol use, suicide, hurting oneself, and many more risks (Lindy, Friedman & Wilson, 2001). Any case of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder does indeed require serious treatment.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in some cases never goes away, even with the help of medication and therapy (Lindy, Friedman & Wilson, 2001). There are many types of treatments available for Post Traumatic Stress, such as, therapy and medication (Lindy, Friedman & Wilson, 2001). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a hard disorder to cope with in some cases. One type of treatment that can help a patient with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can be “Cognitive Therapies”.

Cognitive Therapies is a therapy that teaches people new, more adaptive ways of thinking and acting; based on the assumption that thoughts intervene between events and our emotional reactions (Myers, 2011). I chose cognitive therapy as one treatment because cognitive therapy could help a patient with depression. Patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder become depressed often, due to all of trauma the brain has gone through with witnessing or going through the horrific times that causes Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Schiraldi, 2000).

I feel that cognitive therapy is appropriate for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because cognitive therapy focuses on depression. Cognitive therapy helps patients, with depression, to overcome that stage and move on (Myers, 2011). Cognitive therapy also helps patients to look past depression onto the bigger and better things/sides of life (Myers, 2011). Cognitive therapy helps to change the way that someone’s thinking process works against Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Becks therapy for depressions says; “If people are miserable, they can be helped to change their minds” (Myers, 2011).

Cognitive Therapy is also intended not only to help change the way someone’s thinking process works, but also helps actions of patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. There is also another therapy that could be useful for patients suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It is very similar to Cognitive Therapy. Its called Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy is a popular integrative therapy that combines cognitive therapy (changing self-defeating thinking) with behavior therapy (changing behavior) (Myers, 2011).

I chose Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as another solution to help patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because; people that have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder gain a behavior that was never part of their lives before having the disorder. Also this therapy does not only aim to alter the way that people think like how Cognitive Therapy does, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy also helps to alter the way that people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder behave (Myers, 2011).

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy is appropriate for patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because it helps the patients to learn how to deal with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms that they gain such as the behavior, and the thinking process that comes along with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This treatment called “Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy” is intended to help and change behavior, brain chemistry, and also the thinking process. It is very appropriate with any patient who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because every patient with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder gain brain and behavior problems.

The last Treatment that I think will be helpful for a patient suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is called “Family Therapies”. Family Therapy is where a therapist helps family members understand how their ways of relating to one another create problems. The treatments emphasis is not on changing the individuals but on changing their relationships and interactions (Myers, 2011). This could not only help patients that are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder but also his or her families.

Therapists tend to view families as systems, in which each persons actions trigger reactions from others (Myers, 2011) Patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder tend to lose interest in activities that they once enjoyed. Also they tend to feel frightened, sad, anxious, or even disconnected; while other victims feel that they are constantly in danger, afraid, aggressive, and have those painful memories that keep replaying in their minds, which mess with their everyday lives (England, 2009).

Family Therapy is very important for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder victims because I feel that a patient cannot go to therapy on their own and understand what’s wrong and what they need to do when their family has little or no understanding of what’s wrong and how they can help their family member that is suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Family Therapy would not only help the victim’s actions, behavior, and thinking but also the victims that are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorders fellow family members (Myers, 2011).

Post Traumatic Stress is a serious condition that normal people of the world suffer from due to being exposed to an event, or even a series of events, that is very over whelming and stressful; like war, rape or abuse (Schiraldi, 2000). If you, or a loved one suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, I recommend that you seek help as soon as possible, because it is not something that will just disappear on its own. Every victim with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder should try therapy and medication (if medication is necessary) to help ease the mind, pain and discomfort.

References

Myers, D. (2011). Exploring psychology. (8th ed. , Vol. 1, pp. 464-465). New York, NY: Worth Publishers. Schiraldi, G. (2000). The post-traumatic stress disorder source book. Lincolnwood, Illinois: Lowell House. Beckner, V. , & Arden, J. (2008). Conquering post-traumatic stress disorder. Beverly, MA: Fair Winds Press. England, D. (2009). The post-traumatic stress disorder relationship. Avon, MA: Adams Media. Flannery, R. (1997). Post-traumatic stress disorder. New York, NY: The Crossroad Publishing Company. Lindy, J. , Friedman, M. , & Wilson, J. (2001). Treating psychological trauma and ptsd. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

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