Product and Service Costing - Costs Essay Example

CHAPTER 5 PRODUCT AND SERVICE COSTING:? - Product and Service Costing introduction?? A PROCESS SYSTEMS APPROACH LEARNING OBJECTIVES AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Describe the basic characteristics of process costing, including cost flows, journal entries, and the cost of production report. 2. Describe process costing for settings without work-in-process inventories. 3. Define equivalent units, and explain their role in process costing. 4. Prepare a departmental production report using the FIFO method. 5. Prepare a departmental production report using the weighted average method.

6. Prepare a departmental production report with transferred-in goods and changes in output measures. 7. Describe the basic features of operation costing. 8. Explain how spoilage is treated in a process costing system. CHAPTER SUMMARY THIS CHAPTER INTRODUCES THE PROCESS COSTING SYSTEM DESIGNED FOR COMPANIES THAT PRODUCE LARGE NUMBERS OF HOMOGENEOUS PRODUCTS PASSING THROUGH A SERIES OF PROCESSES. IT ALSO EXPLAINS WHY PROCESS COSTING CAN BE USED IN THE SERVICE INDUSTRY AND JIT MANUFACTURING FIRMS.

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WHEN WORK-IN-PROCESS INVENTORIES ARE PRESENT, EQUIVALENT UNITS MUST BE USED TO MEASURE OUTPUTS. NOTE THAT TWO DIFFERENT METHODS (FIFO OR WEIGHTED AVERAGE) CAN BE USED TO HANDLE THE PRIOR-PERIOD WORK AND PRIOR-PERIOD COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BEGINNING WORK-IN-PROCESS INVENTORIES. IN ADDITION, THE OPERATION COSTING IS PRESENTED AS A HYBRID SYSTEM FOR THOSE MANUFACTURING ENVIRONMENTS THAT HAVE BOTH JOB AND PROCESS CHARACTERISTICS. CHAPTER REVIEW I. PROCESS COSTING SYSTEMS:? BASIC OPERATIONAL AND COST CONCEPTS

Process costing systems are designed to assign costs to a large number of homogeneous products passing through a series of processes. Each process performs specific activities that bring a product closer to completion. Thus, a process is a series of activities (operations) that are linked to perform a specific objective. A. Cost Flows 1. The cost flows in a process cost system are tracked and accumulated by process. Each process, thus, will have a separate WIP account to track manufacturing costs. 2. When goods are completed in one process, they are transferred with their costs to the subsequent process.

3. Costs transferred from a prior process to a subsequent process are referred to as transferred-in costs. The costs of goods being transferred into a process can be considered a type of “raw material” cost that is added at the beginning of the process. Review textbook Exhibit 5-2, which illustrates the different cost accumulation approaches between job-order costing and process costing systems. Review textbook Exhibit 5-3, which compares the job-order costing and process costing by focusing on the cost flows through different work-in-process accounts.

B. The Production Report 1. In process costing, the production report summarizes the manufacturing activity within a process for a given period of time. The report also serves as a source document for transferring costs from the WIP account of a prior process to the WIP account of a subsequent process. 2. A production report traces the flow of units through the process, identifies the costs charged to the process, shows the computation of unit costs, and shows the disposition of the costs of the process for the period. C. Unit Costs 1.

The calculation of unit costs in a process system involves: ¦ Computing the manufacturing costs for a process department for a given time period. ¦ Computing the output in units of the process department for that same time period. ¦ Calculating the unit cost by dividing the costs of the period by the units produced during the period. That is, each unit in each process receives a similar share of manufacturing costs. 2. Unit costs are needed to: ¦ Compute the cost of goods transferred out of the process. ¦ Determine the value of the ending inventory.

3. Special care is required when calculating unit costs in the following situations: ¦ If there is beginning work-in-process inventory, the FIFO or weighted average method is used to handle the beginning WIP inventory because these units have prior-period work and costs. ¦ If there are manufacturing costs added at different times during the process, separate categories of equivalent units and unit cost calculation are required to handle nonuniform application of production costs. Review textbook Exhibit 5-4, which summarizes the features of a process costing system.

II. Process Costing with No Work-in-Process Inventories If there are no inventories (which many services do not have), the average cost per unit can be computed simply using the process costing principle. That is, [pic] Process costing can be applied in many firms that do not have work-in-process inventory. Two such settings are service organizations and JIT manufacturing firms. A. Service Organizations Service organizations that provide any service that is homogeneous and repeatedly produced can take advantage of a process costing approach. ¦ Example:?

Airline companies provide air travel that involves a sequence of services including reservation, ticketing, baggage checking and seat confirmation, flight, and baggage delivery and pickup. B. JIT Manufacturing Firms JIT manufacturing firms that produce relatively homogeneous goods using stable processes often use process costing. 1. Successful implementation of JIT policies tends to reduce work-in-process inventories to minimal levels. 2. JIT firms also use work cells to produce products. The cell manufacturing structure allows the use of process costing to: ¦ Collect costs by cell for a period of time.

¦ Measure output of the cell for the same period. ¦ Calculate unit cost by dividing the costs of the period by the output of the period. III. Process Costing with Ending Work-in-Process Inventories A. Introduction The output of a department during a certain period includes: ¦ Units completed and transferred out during the period. ¦ Ending work-in-process inventory units. B. Equivalent Units as Output Measures 1. Equivalent units are the measure of a period’s output, because some units remain in ending work-in-process inventory and have not been completed.

These ending work-in-process inventory units do not contain the same amount of inputs as a completed and transferred-out unit. ¦ To calculate equivalent units there must be an estimate of the degree of completion for the work-in-process inventory units. 2. Equivalent units of output (equivalent units) are the completed units that could have been produced given the total amount of productive effort made for a given period. Equivalent units for transferred-out units = 100% ? Units transferred out Equivalent units for ending WIP inventory = Completion degree ?

Ending WIP inventory units Thus, the equivalent units of output for a given period is calculated as follows: Equivalent units = Units completed and transferred out +(Completion degree ? Ending WIP inventory units) The unit cost of the equivalent units for a given period is calculated as follows: [pic] C. Cost of Production Report 1. The cost of production report provides a summary of unit information and cost information. a. The unit information section includes physical units flow and degrees of completion information.

BI (WIP) + Units started=Units completed + EI (WIP) Units to account forUnits accounted for The physical units flow and degree of completion are important because they contain the information needed to calculate equivalent units. b. The cost information section includes: BI (WIP) + Cost incurred during period=Cost of goods transferred out + EI (WIP) Costs to account forCosts accounted for 2. The preparation of a cost of production report follows a five-step procedure: a. Analyze the flow of the physical units. Estimate the degree of completion in ending work-in-process inventory units.

b. Calculate the equivalent units. c. Compute the unit cost. d. Determine the cost of goods transferred out and the costs remaining in work-in-process inventory. e. Reconcile the costs by determining whether the costs in beginning work in process plus the costs added during the period equal the costs transferred out plus the costs remaining in ending work in process. Review textbook Exhibit 5-5, which gives an example of a cost of production report. D. Nonuniform Application of Productive Inputs 1. Not all inputs are added at the same time. For example, materials

may be added at the start of the process or at discrete times during the process, while labor and overhead may be added continuously throughout the process. 2. If the inputs are added at different times, separate equivalent units must be calculated for each category of input. The unit cost is then calculated for each input category. The total unit cost is the sum of the individual category unit costs. ¦ It is common to have separate categories for transferred-in costs (i. e. , prior department costs), several different materials (that are added at different times), and conversion costs (labor and overhead).

E. Beginning Work-in-Process Inventories 1. The work done on beginning work in process represents prior-period work/effort, and the costs assigned to it are prior-period costs. 2. Beginning work-in-process inventories can be handled using two different cost flow approaches: the first-in, first-out (FIFO) costing method and the weighted average method. IV. FIFO Costing Method A. Basic Principles of FIFO Costing 1. Under the FIFO costing method, only current-period costs and current-period outputs are used to compute the current-period unit costs. 2.

Costs found in beginning work in process and the equivalent units of effort found in the beginning inventory are excluded from the calculations for the current-period unit costs. 3. A physical analogy to the FIFO method would be a pipeline. The beginning WIP must first exit the pipeline before any units started during the period would exit. Similarly, the costs of the beginning WIP would leave the pipeline before any costs added during the period would exit. B. Calculation of Equivalent Units Equivalent units calculated using the FIFO method is the total of three parts: FIFO equivalent units = (Units in beginning WIP ?

Percentage completed this period) +Units started and finished this period +(Units in ending WIP ? Percentage completed this period) Review textbook Exhibit 5-8, which shows the equivalent units of production computation using the FIFO method. Note that the materials are added at the beginning of the mixing process. The information about the degree of completion for beginning and ending work in process relates to conversion costs. C. Computation of Unit Cost [pic] D. Output Costs Output costs include the cost of units completed and transferred out and the cost of ending work-in-process units.

1. Cost of units completed and transferred out using the FIFO method is the total of three parts: FIFO cost of units completed and transferred out = Beginning WIP cost +Cost to complete the beginning WIP +Cost of units started and finished during the current period The FIFO costing method assumes that the units in beginning work in process are completed before any new production is started during the period. Additional work and costs are added in the current period to complete the beginning work in process (prior-period effort and costs).

Then the cost of units started and completed in the current period are computed. 2. Cost of ending work in process using the FIFO method is calculated as follows: FIFO cost of ending WIP = FIFO unit cost ? (Units of ending WIP ? Completion degree) Review textbook Exhibit 5-9, which shows the complete production report using the FIFO method. E. Sample Journal Entries 1. To record requisition of materials: Work in Process—Mixingdebit Raw Materialscredit 2. To record the application of overhead and incurrence of direct labor costs: Work in Process—Mixingdebit Conversion Cost Controlcredit 3.

To record the transfer of cost of goods completed from Mixing to the next process, Tableting: Work in Process—Tabletingdebit Work in Process—Mixingcredit Note that each process has a separate work-in-process account to track manufacturing costs. V. Weighted Average Costing Method A. Basic Principles of Weighted Average Costing 1. The weighted average costing method does not make a distinction between the beginning work in process and inputs during the period. Under the weighted average method, prior-period work and costs found in beginning work in process are merged with current-period work and costs. 2.

A physical analogy to the weighted average method would be a large vat. All of the inputs during the period are commingled with the beginning work in process. Since all of the units are commingled, a unit completed during the period would contain a proportion of the beginning costs and a proportion of the costs added during the period. No distinctions are made between a unit started last period and a unit started this period. B. Calculation of Equivalent Units Equivalent units calculated using the weighted average method is the total of two parts: WA equivalent units = Units completed during the period

+(Units in ending WIP ? Percentage completed this period) Review textbook Exhibit 5-11, which shows the equivalent units of production computation using the weighted average method. Note that the materials are added at the beginning of the mixing process. The information about the degree of completion for beginning and ending work in process relates to conversion costs. C. Computation of Unit Cost [pic] where? WA equivalent units = (Beginning WIP + Effort input during current period) D. Output Costs Output costs include the cost of units completed and transferred out and the cost of ending work-in-process units. 1.

Cost of units completed and transferred out using the weighted average method is calculated as follows: WA cost of units completed and transferred out = Units completed and transferred ? WA unit cost Note that the weighted average method does not make a distinction between the beginning work in process, cost to complete the beginning work in process, and cost of units started and finished. It uses the same unit cost for all units transferred out. 2. Cost of ending work in process using the weighted average method is calculated as follows: WA cost of ending WIP = WA unit cost ?

(Units of ending WIP ? Completion degree) Review textbook Exhibit 5-12, which shows the complete production report using the weighted average method. E. Comparisons Between FIFO and Weighted Average Methods 1. The FIFO method separates the effort found in beginning work in process from the effort added during the period; the weighted average method combines this effort. This difference is reflected in the equivalent units calculations and in the unit cost calculations. 2. The weighted average method creates the possibilities for errors by merging the prior-period work and costs with the current-period work and costs.

3. The weighted average method fails to provide desirable control information of the comparisons between the actual cost for the current period and the budgeted or standard cost for the period. It combines the performance of the current period with that of a prior period. 4. The major advantage of the weighted average method is that it avoids certain bookkeeping and computation complexity. The weighted average method is appropriate when the costs of production remain very stable from one period to the next. VI. Treatment of Transferred-In Goods

Transferred-in goods are the goods that are transferred out of the previous process into the subsequent process. ¦ Transferred-in goods are treated as if they are a separate material category that is added at the beginning of the process for the equivalent units and unit cost computations. The transferred-in units have 100% of the work and costs of the prior process. ¦ Transferred-in costs per unit must be included in the computation of ending work-in-process valuation and cost of units transferred out. Review textbook Exhibit 5-15, which shows a production report with transferred-in units. VII.

Operation Costing A. Operation costing is a costing approach for a hybrid production method called batch production process. Each batch uses different doses of materials but makes the same demands on the conversion resources of individual processes/operations. B. The operation costing approach assigns: ¦ Materials costs to batches because the materials used are significantly different. ¦ Conversion costs to processes because the conversion activities are similar or identical. C. Work orders are used to collect and track production costs for each batch. The work order sheet is the source document that:

¦ Records the types of materials, quantity, and prices assigned to certain work numbers. ¦ Assigns conversion costs by processes using a predetermined conversion rate and the actual usage of the activity driver. Conversion cost = Predetermined conversion rate ? Actual usage of activity driver Review textbook Exhibit 5-16, which illustrates the physical flow and cost flow features of operation costing. VIII. Appendix: Spoiled Units Spoiled units are the units lost as a result of the process or as a result of defects. A. The cost of spoiled units can be treated in two different ways: 1.

If the spoilage is normal (expected), the cost of spoiled units is added to the cost of good units completed and transferred out. Cost of units transferred out = (Number of good units ? Unit cost) +(Number of spoiled units ? Degree of completion ? Unit cost) 2. If the spoilage is considered abnormal, the spoilage cost is assigned to a spoilage loss account. Abnormal spoilage is identified and treated as an expense of the period. Cost of units transferred out = Number of good units ? Unit cost Loss from abnormal spoilage = Number of spoiled units ? Degree of completion ? Unit cost B.

Comparison of Spoilage Treatments 1. Normal spoilage is not tracked separately but is embedded in the total cost of good units. No information is available to direct quality improvement efforts. 2. Abnormal spoilage treatment helps management identify the activities that are associated with the spoiled units by tracking costs of spoiled units in a separate account. It supports total quality management (TQM) by providing information used to discover the root cause of poor quality. KEY TERMS TEST FROM THE LIST THAT FOLLOWS, SELECT THE TERM THAT BEST COMPLETES EACH STATEMENT AND WRITE IT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED. batch production processes

cost reconciliation equivalent units of output FIFO costing method operation costing physical flow schedule process process costing principle production report transferred-in costs weighted average costing method work orders 1. A(n) _____________ is a series of activities or operations that are linked to perform a specific objective. 2. The costs transferred from a prior process to a subsequent process are referred to as ?? _______________________________. 3. The _____________________________ is the document that summarizes the manufacturing activity that takes place in a process department for a given period of time.

4. “To calculate the period’s unit cost, divide the costs of the period by the output of the period” is known as the ________________________________________. 5. The completed units that could have been produced given the total amount of productive effort expended during the period under consideration are known as the __________________ _________________________. 6. Under the _____________________________________, the equivalent units and manufacturing costs in beginning work in process are excluded from the current-period unit cost calculation. 7.

________________________________ is determining whether the costs in beginning work in process plus the manufacturing costs added during the current period equal the total costs assigned to units transferred out and to units in ending work in process. 8. The major benefit of the __________________________________________________ ?????? is simplicity. 9. A(n) ________________________________________ accounts for all units flowing through a department during a period. 10. _____________________________ is a blend of job and process costing procedures applied to batches of homogeneous products.

MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUIZ COMPLETE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS BY CIRCLING THE LETTER OF THE BEST ANSWER. 1. Which of the following is not a characteristic of a process costing system? a. Costs are accumulated by process rather than by job. b. Goods are relatively homogeneous. c. Only one work-in-process account is needed. d. There may be differences in the timing of the various inputs. e. Different cost flow assumptions are allowable. 2. Which of the following is not a step in the preparation of a cost of production report? a. Compute the unit costs. b. Measure the quality of the units transferred.

c. Calculate the equivalent units. d. Analyze the flow of the physical units. e. Reconcile the costs. 3. A firm using a “just-in-time” philosophy: a. cannot utilize a process costing approach. b. cannot use either job-order or process costing since there are no inventories. c. has too varied of a product line to make process costing feasible. d. would not be concerned with unit costs. e. should have an insignificant level of inventories. 4. Equivalent units of output are necessary for process costing when: a. there are no beginning or ending inventories. b.

a job-order costing system is used. c. ending inventories exist. d. the FIFO method is used, but not when the weighted average method is used. e. the weighted average method is used, but not when the FIFO method is used. 5. Weighted average and FIFO equivalent units would be the same in a period when: a. no beginning inventory exists. b. no ending inventory exists. c. both a beginning and an ending inventory exist but are not necessarily equal. d. the beginning inventory units equal the ending inventory units. e. Weighted average and FIFO equivalent units will never be the same. 6.

Which of the following is not included in the calculation of FIFO equivalent units? a. work performed in a prior period b. work performed to finish the beginning work-in-process units c. work performed to start and finish units during the period d. work performed to start the ending work-in-process units e. All of the above are included in the FIFO equivalent units calculation. 7. Which of the following is not included in the calculation of weighted average equivalent units? a. work performed in a prior period b. work performed to finish the beginning work-in-process units c.

work performed to start and finish units during the period d. work performed to start the ending work-in-process units e. All of the above are included in the weighted average equivalent units calculation. 8. Transferred-in costs are treated most like which of the following in the computation of equivalent units? a. labor b. overhead c. materials added at the start of the process d. materials added evenly throughout the process e. materials added at the end of the process 9. Process X had 900 units in process at the beginning of the month, 40 percent complete.

At the end of the month, there were 400 units in process, 30 percent complete. If 8,000 units were started during the month, what were the FIFO equivalent units? a. 8,080 units b. 8,260 units c. 8,420 units d. 8,480 units e. 8,820 units 10. Process X had 900 units in process at the beginning of the month, 40 percent complete. At the end of the month, there were 400 units in process, 30 percent complete. If 8,000 units were started during the month, what were the weighted average equivalent units? a. 8,120 units b. 8,280 units c. 8,500 units d. 8,620 units e. 8,780 units 11. Process Y uses two materials.

Material 1 is added at the start of the process; Material 2 is added at the 50 percent completion point. There were 800 units in process (25 percent complete) at the beginning of the month; there were 400 units in process (60 percent complete) at the end of the month. Conversion costs are added evenly throughout the process. If 6,000 units were transferred out during the month, what were the FIFO equivalent units? Material 1Material 2Conversion Costs a. 5,600 units6,400 units6,040 units b. 6,400 units7,200 units6,840 units c. 5,600 units5,800 units6,040 units d. 6,000 units6,000 units6,000 units e. 6,240 units6,240 units6,240 units

12. Process Y uses two materials. Material 1 is added at the start of the process; Material 2 is added at the 50 percent completion point. There were 800 units in process (25 percent complete) at the beginning of the month; there were 400 units in process (60 percent complete) at the end of the month. Conversion costs are added evenly throughout the process. If 6,000 units were transferred out during the month, what were the weighted average equivalent units? Material 1Material 2Conversion Costs a. 6,240 units6,240 units6,240 units b. 6,400 units6,200 units6,240 units c. 6,400 units6,400 units6,240 units

d. 6,400 units6,400 units6,400 units e. 6,400 units7,200 units6,840 units Use the following information for Questions 13 through 20: Kimbeth Manufacturing uses a process costing system to manufacture Dust Density Sensors for the mining industry. The following information pertains to operations for the month of May 2004: Units Beginning work in process inventory, May 116,000 Started in production during May100,000 Completed production during May92,000 Ending work in process inventory, May 3124,000 The beginning inventory was 60 percent complete for materials and 20 percent complete for conversion costs.

The ending inventory was 90 percent complete for materials and 40 percent complete for conversion costs. Costs pertaining to the month of May are as follows: Beginning inventory costs Materials$54,560 Direct labor20,320 Factory overhead15,240 Costs incurred during May Materials used$468,000 Direct labor182,880 Factory overhead391,160 13. Using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method, the equivalent units of production for materials are: a. 97,600 units. b. 104,000 units. c. 107,200 units. d. 108,000 units. e. 113,600 units. 14. Using the FIFO method, the equivalent units of production for conversion costs are: a.

85,600 units. b. 88,800 units. c. 95,200 units. d. 98,400 units. e. 101,600 units. 15. Using the FIFO method, the equivalent unit cost of materials for May is: a. $4. 12. b. $4. 50. c. $4. 60. d. $4. 80. e. $5. 46. 16. Using the FIFO method, the equivalent unit conversion cost for May is: a. $5. 65. b. $5. 83. c. $6. 00. d. $6. 20. e. $6. 62. 17. Using the FIFO method, the total cost of the units in the ending work-in-process inventory at May 31, 2004, is: a. $153,168. b. $154,800. c. $155,328. d. $156,960. e. $159,648. 18. Using the weighted average method, the equivalent unit cost of materials for May is: a.

$4. 12. b. $4. 50. c. $4. 60. d. $5. 03. e. $5. 46. 19. Using the weighted average method, the equivalent unit conversion cost for May is: a. $5. 65. b. $5. 83. c. $6. 00. d. $6. 41. e. $6. 62. 20. Using the weighted average method, the total cost of the units in the ending work-in-process inventory at May 31, 2004, is: a. $86,400. b. $153,960. c. $154,800. d. $155,328. e. $156,960. 21. Smile Labs develops 35mm film using a four-step process that moves progressively through four departments. The company specializes in overnight service and has the largest drugstore chain as its primary customer.

Currently, direct labor, direct materials, and overhead are accumulated by department. The cost accumulation system that best describes the system Smile Labs is using is: a. operation costing. b. activity-based costing. c. job-order costing. d. process costing. e. hybrid costing. PRACTICE TEST EXERCISE 1 Samura Company prepares a fertilizer compound by combining a variety of ingredients, blending for a period of time, and bagging the final mixture. All materials are added at the beginning of the process. a. On December 1, beginning work in process is 60 percent as to conversion costs.

Costs associated with the 5,000 partially completed units are as follows: materials, $4,500; direct labor, $600; and overhead, $3,000. b. On December 31, work in process consisted of 8,000 units, 40 percent complete as to conversion costs. c. During the month, 70,000 units were transferred to finished goods. d. Costs added during the month were as follows: Materials$75,000 Labor16,000 Overhead88,000 Required: Prepare a cost of production report for the month of December using the weighted average method. EXERCISE 1? (Continued) USE THIS PAGE FOR YOUR ANSWER. EXERCISE 2 REQUIRED:

Use the information in Exercise 1 to prepare a cost of production report for December using the FIFO method. EXERCISE 3 LEARNING COMPANY MANUFACTURES A PRODUCT THAT PASSES THROUGH TWO DEPARTMENTS, MIXING AND BOTTLING. IN THE BOTTLING DEPARTMENT, MATERIALS ARE ADDED AT THE END OF THE PROCESS. CONVERSION COSTS ARE INCURRED UNIFORMLY THROUGHOUT THE PROCESS. During the month of June, the Bottling Department received 60,000 units from the Mixing Department. The transferred-in cost of the 60,000 units was $139,800. Costs added by the Bottling Department during June included the following: Direct materials$?

70,400 Direct labor and overhead163,200 On June 1, the Bottling Department had 10,000 units in inventory that were 30 percent complete with respect to conversion costs. The costs associated with the 10,000 units in beginning inventory were as follows: Transferred-in costs$23,300 Direct labor and overhead25,500 On June 30, there were 12,000 units of work-in-process ending inventory, one-third complete with respect to conversion costs. Required: Prepare a cost of production report using the weighted average method. EXERCISE 3? (Continued) USE THIS SPACE TO CONTINUE YOUR ANSWER.

EXERCISE 4 Triad Electronics manufactures circuit-testing devices in a single department. Three different models are produced: Standard, Economy, and Deluxe. All three models require the same amount of processing time; the differences between the three models are in the materials used. During the month, $91,400 in conversion costs were expended. Production statistics are as follows: StandardEconomyDeluxe Beginning WIP50 units50 units25 units % completed60%60%40% Started600 units900 units800 units Ending WIP40 units60 units30 units % completed60%40%40% Cost of materials$45$25$80 Required:

Determine the transferred-out and ending work-in-process values using operational costing. Use job-order costing for materials and FIFO process costing for conversion costs. Assume that materials are added at the beginning of the process. EXERCISE 4? (Continued) USE THIS PAGE FOR YOUR ANSWER. EXERCISE 5 THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE FOR THE ABC CO. FOR THE MONTH OF JANUARY. ALL MATERIALS ARE ADDED AT THE START OF PRODUCTION. ALL SPOILAGE IS ABNORMAL AND IS DETECTED BY THE FINAL INSPECTION AT THE END OF THE PROCESS. Beginning work in process? (80% complete)8,000 units Started35,000 units Ending work in process?

(55% complete)15,000 units Transferred out24,500 units Beginning work-in-process costs: Materials$14,000 Conversion38,200 Current costs: Materials$? 50,750 Conversion173,130 Assume that ABC Co. uses the FIFO method. Required: 1. Calculate the equivalent units of production for materials and conversion costs. EXERCISE 5? (Continued) 2. CALCULATE UNIT DIRECT MATERIALS COST AND UNIT CONVERSION COST. 3. What is the total cost of the units transferred out, the cost of ending inventory, and the cost of spoiled units? “CAN YOU? ” CHECKLIST ? CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE KEY DIFFERENCES AMONG JOB-ORDER, PROCESS, AND OPERATION COSTING SYSTEMS?

? Can you calculate equivalent units of production using FIFO? Using weighted average? ? Can you prepare a cost of production report using either the FIFO method or the weighted average method under the following conditions? ¦ single production process ¦ multiple production processes ¦ single material input ¦ multiple material inputs ¦ multiple production processes with changes in the way outputs are measured from process to process ¦ input of materials at times other than the beginning of the process or uniformly throughout the process ? Can you determine product costs using an operation costing system?

? Can you explain how spoilage is treated in a process costing system? ANSWERS KEY TERMS TEST 1. PROCESS 2. transferred-in costs 3. production report 4. process costing principle 5. equivalent units of output 6. FIFO costing method 7. Cost reconciliation 8. weighted average costing method 9. physical flow schedule 10. Operation costing MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUIZ 1. C 2. b 3. e 4. c 5. a 6. a 7. e 8. c 9. bBeginning WIP:900 units ? 60% yet to finish = 540 units Started and completed:(8,000 units started – 400 units unfinished in EWIP) = 7,600 units Ending WIP:400 units ? 30% = 120 units

Thus, the FIFO equivalent units = 540 units + 7,600 units +120 units = 8,260 units 10. dCompleted:(900 units in BWIP + 8,000 units started – 400 units unfinished) = 8,500 units Ending WIP:400 units ? 30% = 120 units Thus, the weighted average equivalent units = 8,500 units + 120 units = 8,620 units 11. aMaterial 1Material 2Conversion Beginning WIP0(800 ? 0%)800(800 ? 100%)600(800 ? 75%) Start and completed5,200(6,000 – 800)5,2005,200 Ending WIP? 400(400 ? 100%)? 400(400 ? 100%)? 240(400 ? 60%) Equivalent units5,6006,4006,040 12. cMaterial 1Material 2Conversion Completed6,0006,0006,000 Ending WIP?

400(400 ? 100%)? 400(400 ? 100%)? 240(400 ? 60%) Equivalent units6,4006,4006,240 13. bBeginning WIP:16,000 units ? 40% yet to finish = 6,400 units Started and completed:(100,000 units started – 24,000 units unfinished in ending WIP) = 76,000 units Ending WIP:24,000 units ? 90% = 21,600 units Thus, the FIFO equivalent units for materials = 6,400 units + 76,000 units + 21,600 units = 104,000 units 14. dBeginning WIP:16,000 units ? 80% yet to finish = 12,800 units Started and completed:(100,000 units started – 24,000 units unfinished in ending WIP) = 76,000 units Ending WIP:24,000 units ?

40% = 9,600 units Thus, the FIFO equivalent units for conversion costs = 12,800 units + 76,000 units + 9,600 units = 98,400 units 15. bDirect materials unit cost = $468,000 / 104,000 units = $4. 50 per equivalent unit 16. bConversion unit cost = ($182,880 + $391,160) / 98,400 units = $5. 83 per equivalent unit 17. aDM cost in ending WIP = (24,000 units ? 90%) ? $4. 50 = $97,200 Conversion cost in ending WIP = (24,000 units ? 40%) ? $5. 83 = $55,968 Thus, the total cost in ending WIP = $97,200 + $55,968 = $153,168 18. cCompleted units:92,000 units ? 100% = 92,000 units Ending WIP:24,000 units ?

90% = 21,600 units Thus, the weighted average equivalent units = 92,000 units + 21,600 units = 113,600 units DM unit cost = ($54,560 + $468,000) / 113,600 units = $4. 60 per equivalent unit 19. cCompleted units:92,000 units ? 100% = 92,000 units Ending WIP:24,000 units ? 40% = 9,600 units Thus, the weighted average equivalent units = 92,000 units + 9,600 units = 101,600 units Conversion cost = [($20,320 + $182,880) + ($15,240 + $391,160)] / 101,600 units = $6 per equivalent unit 20. eCost of completed units = [92,000 units ? ($4. 60 + $6. 00)] = $975,200 Cost of ending WIP = [(24,000 units ?

90%) ? $4. 60] + [(24,000 units ? 40%) ? $6. 00] = $156,960 21. d PRACTICE TEST EXERCISE 1? (PRODUCTION REPORT—WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD) SAMURA COMPANY Fertilizing Department Production Report for December (Weighted Average Method) UNIT INFORMATION Units to account for:Units accounted for: Units, beginning work in process5,000Units completed70,000 Units started73,000Units, ending work in process? 8,000 Total units to account for78,000Total units accounted for78,000 Equivalent Units MaterialsLaborOverhead Units completed70,00070,00070,000 Units in ending work in process? 8,000? 3,200? 3,200

Total equivalent units78,00073,20073,200 COST INFORMATION Costs to account for: MaterialsLaborOverheadTotal Beginning work in process$? 4,500$?? 600$? 3,000$?? 8,100* Incurred during period? 75,000? 16,000? 88,000? 179,000* Total costs to account for$79,500$16,600$91,000$187,100* Divided by equivalent units? 78,000? 73,200? 73,200 Cost per equivalent unit$? 1. 019$? 0. 227$? 1. 243$? 2. 489* Costs accounted for: Units completed? (70,000 ? $2. 489)$174,230* Ending work in process: Materials? (8,000 ? $1. 019)$? 8,152 Labor? (3,200 ? $0. 227)726 Overhead? (3,200 ? $1. 243)?? 3,978?? 12,856*

Total costs accounted for$187,086* *$14 round-off error Exercise 2? (Production Report—FIFO Method) SAMURA COMPANY Fertilizing Department Production Report for December (FIFO Method) UNIT INFORMATION Units to account for:Units accounted for: Units, beginning work in process5,000Units completed70,000 Units started73,000Units, ending work in process? 8,000 Total units to account for78,000Total units accounted for78,000 Equivalent Units MaterialsLaborOverhead Units started and completed65,00065,00065,000 Units, beginning work in process–0–2,0002,000 Units, ending work in process? 8,000? 3,200? 3,200

Equivalent units of output73,00070,20070,200 COST INFORMATION Costs to account for: MaterialsLaborOverheadTotal Beginning work in process$? 4,500$?? 600$? 3,000$?? 8,100* Incurred during the period? 75,000? 16,000? 88,000? 179,000* Total costs to account for$79,500$16,600$91,000$187,100* Cost per equivalent unit: Current costs$75,000$16,000$88,000 Divided by equivalent units? 73,000? 70,200? 70,200 Cost per equivalent unit$? 1. 027$? 0. 228$? 1. 254$? 2. 509* Costs accounted for: Units transferred out: Units, beginning work in process: From prior period ?($4,500 + $600 + $3,000)$?? 8,100 From current period

?[2,000 ? ($0. 228 + $1. 254)]??? 2,964 Units started and completed (65,000 ? $2. 509)? 163,085$174,149* Ending work in process: Materials? (8,000 ? $1. 027)$?? 8,216 Labor? (3,200 ? $0. 228)730 Overhead? (3,200 ? $1. 254)??? 4,013?? 12,959* Total costs accounted for$187,108* *$8 round-off error Exercise 3? (Learning Company) LEARNING COMPANY Bottling Department Production Report for June (Weighted Average Method) UNIT INFORMATION Units to account for:Units accounted for: Units, beginning work in process10,000Units completed and transferred out58,000 Units started60,000Units, ending work in process12,000

Total units to account for70,000Total units accounted for70,000 Equivalent Units Transferred InMaterialsConversion Units completed and transferred out58,00058,00058,000 Units in ending work in process12,000?? –0–? 4,000(12,000 ? 1/3) Total equivalent units70,00058,00062,000 COST INFORMATION Costs to account for: Transferred InMaterialsConversionTotal Beginning work in process$? 23,300$?? –0–$? 25,500$? 48,800* Incurred during June? 139,800? 70,400? 163,200? 373,400* Total costs to account for$163,100$70,400$188,700$422,200* Divided by equivalent units?? 70,000? 58,000?? 62,000 Cost per equivalent unit$? 2. 330$ 1.

214$? 3. 044$? 6. 588* Costs accounted for: Units transferred out? (58,000 ? $6. 588)$382,104* Ending work in process: Transferred in? (12,000 ? $2. 33)$27,960 Conversion cost? (12,000 ? 1/3 ? $3. 044)? 12,176?? 40,136* Total costs accounted for$422,240* *$40 round-off error Exercise 4? (Triad Electronics—Operational Costing) PHYSICAL UNITS INFORMATION: StandardEconomyDeluxe Units to account for: Beginning work in process505025 Units started600900800 Total units to account for650950825 Units accounted for: Ending work in process406030 Units completed and transferred out610890795 Total units accounted for650950825

Equivalent units computation using the FIFO method: StandardEconomyDeluxe Beginning work in process202015 Add:? Started and completed560a840b770c Add:? Equivalent units in ending work in process? 24? 24? 12 Total equivalent units604884797 Conversion cost per equivalent unit = $91,400 / (604 + 884 + 797) = $40 Cost per unit: StandardEconomyDeluxe Materials costs$45$25$? 80 Conversion costs? 40? 40?? 40 Total cost per unit$85$65$120 Cost of units completed and transferred out: Standard? ($85 ? 610)$51,850 Economy? ($65 ? 890)$57,850 Deluxe? ($120 ? 795)$95,400 Cost of ending work-in-process units:

StandardEconomyDeluxeTotal Ending work-in-process physical units406030 Materials costs$1,800d$1,500e$2,400f$5,700 Conversion costs?? 960g?? 960h?? 480i? 2,400 Total cost of ending work-in-process units$2,760$2,460$2,880$8,100 a610 – 50 b890 – 50 c795 – 25 d$45 ? 40 e$25 ? 60 f$80 ? 30 g40 ? 0. 6 ? $40 h60 ? 0. 4 ? $40 i30 ? 0. 4 ? $40 Exercise 5? (ABC Co. ) 1. PHYSICAL UNITS INFORMATION: Units to account for: Beginning WIP8,000 Units started35,000 Total units to account for43,000 Units accounted for: Units completed and transferred out24,500 Ending WIP15,000 Abnormal spoilage? 3,500 Total units accounted for43,000

Equivalent units computation using the FIFO method: MaterialsConversion Beginning WIP–0–1,600(8,000 ? 0. 2) Add:? Started and completed16,500(24,500 – 8,000)16,500(24,500 – 8,000) Add:? Equivalent units in ending WIP15,0008,250(15,000 ? 0. 55) Add:? Abnormal spoilage? 3,500? 3,500 Total equivalent units35,00029,850 2. Unit cost computation: Material cost per unit? ($50,750 / 35,000)$1. 45 Conversion cost per unit? ($173,130 / 29,850)? 5. 80 Total cost per unit$7. 25 3. Cost of units completed and transferred out: Beginning WIP? ($14,000 + $38,200)$? 52,200 Cost to finish beginning WIP? (8,000 ?

0. 2 ? $5. 80)9,280 Started and completed? (16,500 ? $7. 25)? 119,625 Total cost of units transferred out$181,105 Cost in ending WIP: Materials? (15,000 ? $1. 45)$21,750 Conversion costs? (15,000 ? 0. 55 ? $5. 80)? 47,850 Total costs of ending WIP units$69,600 Cost of abnormal spoilage? (3,500 ? $7. 25)$25,375 ———————– Learning Objective #??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 2 Learning Objective #1 Learning Objective #3 Learning Objective #4 Learning Objective #5 Learning Objective #6 Learning Objective #8 Learning Objective #7

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