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Romeo and Juliet-Who’s at Fault?

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Even though the Friar isn’t the only person to blame for Romeo and Gullet’s death, he plays a huge role and is partly to blame for everything that happens. The Friar agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet when they’ve only known each other for less than a day. He agrees to this because he thinks that it would end the feud between the two families that has been going on for years. As he says to Romeo “come, young wavered, come, go with me/Len one respect I’ll thy assistant be/For this alliance may so happy prove/To turn your household’s rancho to pure love” (R+J.

2. 89-92).

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When Romeo gets sent way for killing Table, Friar Laurence comes up with a plan to have Romeo and Juliet be together so he gets Friar John to deliver a message to Romeo. Little did Friar John know that that letter meant life or death. As Friar Laurence says “Unhappy fortune! By my brotherhood/ The letter was not nice but full of charge/ Of dear import, and the neglecting it/May do much danger” (R+J 5.

2. 17-20). The second part of the Friars plan is Georgia 2 to give Juliet a “sleeping potion” and have everyone think she is dead. The Friar makes this outrageous plan because he wants Romeo and Juliet to run way and be together.

Not only is the Friar partly responsible, but so are Gullet’s parents. Lord Caplet, Lady Caplet, and the nurse as well, all plan an arranged marriage for Juliet and Paris. Lord Caplet does not want Juliet to marry as she is only 13 years old, but as soon as he hears it would be to a family with royal connections, he quickly agrees. Juliet was quite upset due to the fact that she loved Romeo, not Paris. Not only do her parents want her to marry Paris, but Lord Caplet threatens her and tells her that if she doesn’t marry Paris then he will be disowned and no longer be allowed in their home.

As the Caplet says “To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love/ I am too young; I pray you, pardon me’/ But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you/ Graze where you shall not house with me. ” (R+J 5. 3. 186-189). Not only are Gullet’s parents threatening her, but the nurse is also very disloyal to her as well. When Juliet asks the nurse for her advice for Juliet refusal to marry Paris the nurse sides with her parents, and this is why Juliet feels betrayed. However, the people who are to blame mostly for Romeo and Gullet’s death re in fact, themselves.

These two main characters get everyone in their lives involved in their mess and the results end in them taking their own lives. Their quick and rash decisions are what lead them to commit suicide. When Romeo see’s that Juliet is “dead”, he can’t imagine what his life will be like without her. His first thought is that he needs to take his life away because he has nothing to live for anymore. The two main themes in this play are “impatience” and “miss communication”. They are portrayed by every single character at least once.

Friar Laurence tells Friar John to deliver the letter to Romeo, but he doesn’t tell him what is was about, or how big its importance Georgia 3 is, so it never gets to Romeo. Moments after Romeo dies; Juliet wakes up and she couldn’t believe what she was seeing in front of her eyes. There Romeo was dead, all because of miscommunication and rational decisions. Then Juliet says: What’s here? A cup, closed in my true love’s hand? Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end: O churl! Drunk all, and left no friendly drop To help me after? Will kiss thy lips; Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,

Cite this Romeo and Juliet-Who’s at Fault?

Romeo and Juliet-Who’s at Fault?. (2018, Mar 17). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/romeo-and-juliet-whos-at-fault/

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