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The Man in a Case

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A Paper AN ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTS OF “THE MAN IN A CASE” BY WENDY WASSERTEIN ARYA FRIZANDIKA 1005121046 ENGLISH STUDY PROGRAM LANGUAGE AND ART DEPARTMENT EDUCATION AND TEACHING TRAINING FACULTY RIAU UNIVERSITY 2013 I. Introduction “The Man in a Case” is a drama authorized by a well-known American playwright, Wendy Wasertein. Simply, this drama told about an optimism aproach of Byelinkov and Varinka. This is a love story which can tell the audience how human beings can find their love in any different forms and ways.

We also can find so many social struggles of this drama that is published in 1986.

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Wendy Wassertein was born on October 18th, 1950 in Brooklyn, New York. She received the Tony Award for Best Play in 1989, and also Pulitzer for in the same year for one of her drama. She has published so many great creation, such as 11 plays, 2 screenplays, 5 books, and an essay. So far, she has gotten 9 awards for all of her works which most of them discuss “the struggle between falling for convention and finding personal satisfication.

” (Wilson). She passed away on January 30, 2006 in New York in age 55 year-old. II. Conntain A. Dialogue The Man in a Case By Wendy Wasserstein??? BYELINKOV. You are ten minutes late.

VARINKA. The most amazing thing happened on my way over here. You know the woman who runs the grocery store down the road. She wears a black wig during the week, and a blond wig on Saturday nights. And she has the daughter who married an engineer in Moscow who is doing very well thank you and is living, God bless them, in a three-room apartment. But he really is the most boring man in the world: All he talks about is his future and his station in life. Well, she heard we were to be married and she gave me this basket of apricots to give to you. BYELINKOV. That is a most amazing thing! VARINKA.

She said to me, Varinka, you are marrying the most honorable man in the entire village. In this village he is the only man fit to speak with my son-in-law. BYELINKOV. I don’t care for apricots. They give me hives. VARINKA. I can return them. I’m sure if I told her they give you hives she would give me a basket, of raisins or a cake. BYELINKOV. I don’t know this woman or her pompous son-in-law. Why would she give me her cakes? VARINKA. She adores you! BYELINKOV. She is emotionally loose. VARINKA. She adores you by reputation. Everyone adores you by reputation. I tell everyone I am to marry Byelinkov, the finest teacher in the country.

BYELINKOV. You tell them this? VARINKA. If they don’t tell me first. BYELINKOV. Pride can be an imperfect value. VARINKA. It isn’t pride. It is the truth. You are a great man! BYELINKOV. I am the master of Greek and Latin at a local school at the end of the village of Mironitski. ( Varinka kisses him. ) VARINKA. And I am to be the master of Greek and Latin’s wife! BYELINKOV. Being married requires a great deal of responsibility. I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children.

We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. VARINKA. You are so sweet! You are the sweetest man in the world! BYELINKOV. I’m a man set in his ways who saw a chance to provide himself with a small challenge. VARINKA. Look at you! Look at you! Your sweet round spectacles, your dear collar always starched, always raised, your perfectly pressed pants always creasing at right angles perpendicular to the floor, and my most favorite part, the sweet little galoshes, rain or shine, just in case. My Byelinkov, never taken by surprise.

Except by me. BYELINKOV. You speak about me as. if I were your pet. VARINKA. You are my pet! My little school mouse. BYELINKOV. A mouse? VARINKA. My sweetest dancing bear with galoshes, my little stale babka. ” BYELINKOV. A stale babka? (Note: cake with almonds and raisins. ) VARINKA. I am not Pushkin. (Note: Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), Russian poet. ) BYELINKOV (laughs. ) That depends what you think of Pushkin. VARINKA. You’re smiling. I knew I could make you smile to day. BYELINKOV. I am a responsible man. Every day I have for breakfast black bread, fruit, hot tea, and every day I smile three times.

I am halfway into my translation of the Aeneid (note: Latin epic poem by the Roman poet Virgil (70-19B. C. ) from classical Greek hexameter into Russian alexandrines. In twenty yeas I have never been late to school: l am a responsible man, but no dancing bear. VARINKA. Dance with me. BYELINKOV. Now? It is nearly four weeks before the wedding! VARINKA. It’s a beautiful afternoon. We are in your garden. The roses are in full bloom. BYELINKOV. The roses have beetles. VARINKA. Dance with me! BYELINKOV. You are a demanding woman. VARINKA. You chose me. And right. And left. And turn. And right. And left.

BYELINKOV. And turn. Give me your hand. You dance like a school mouse. It’s a beautiful afternoon! We are in my garden. The roses are in full bloom! And turn. And turn. (Twirls Varinka around. ) VARINKA. I am the luckiest woman! (Byelinkov stops dancing. ) Why are you stopping? BYELINKOV. To place a lilac in your hair. Every year on this day I will place a lilac in your hair. VARINKA. Will you remember? BYELINKOV. I will write it down. (Takes a notebook from his pocket. ) Dear Byelinkov, don’t forget the day a young lady, your bride, entered your garden, your peace, and danced on the roses.

On that day every year you are to place a lilac in her hair. VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. It is convenient we met. VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. You are a girl. VARINKA. I am thirty. BYELINKOV. But you think like a girl. That is an attractive attribute. VARINKA. Do you love me? BYELINKOV. We’ve never spoken about housekeeping. VARINKA. I am an excellent housekeeper. I kept house for my family on the farm in Gadyatchsky. I can make a beetroot soup with tomatoes and aubergines which is so nice. Awfully awfully nice. BYELINKOV. You are fond of expletives. VARINKA. My beet soup, sir, is excellent!

BYELINKOV. Please don’ t be cross. I too am an excellent housekeeper. I have a place for everything in the house. A shelf for each pot, a cubby for every spoon, a folder for favorite recipes. I have cooked for myself for twenty years. Though my beet soup is not outstanding, it is suffcient. VARINKA. I’m sure it’s very good. BYELINKOV. No. It is awfully, awfully not. What I am outstanding in, however, what gives me greatest pleasure, is preserving those things, which are left over. I wrap each tomato slice I haven’t used in a wet cloth and place it in the coolest corner of the house.

I have had my shoes for seven years because I wrap them in the galoshes you are so fond of. And every night before I go to sleep I wrap my bed in quilts and curtains so I never catch a draft. VARINKA. You sleep with curtains on your bed? BYELINKOV. I like to keep warm. VARINKA. I will make you a new quilt. BYELINKOV. No. No new quilt. That would be hazardous. VARINKA. It is hazardous to sleep under curtains. BYELINKOV. Varinka, I don’t like change very much. If one works out the arithmetic, the final fraction of improvement is at best less than an eighth of value over the total damage caused by disruption.

I never thought of marrying till I saw your eyes dancing among the familiar faces at the headmaster’s tea. I assumed I would grow old preserved like those, which are left over, wrapped suitably in my case of curtains and quilts. VARINKA. Byelinkov, I want us to have dinners with friends and summer country visits. I want people to say, “Have you spent time with Varinka and Byelinkov? He is so happy now that they are married. She is just what lie needed. ” BYELINKOV. You have already brought me some happiness. But I never was a sad man. Don’t ever think I thought I was a sad man.

VARINKA. My sweetest darling, you can be whatever you want! If you are sad, they’ll say she talks all the time, and he is softspoken and kind. BYELINKOV. And if I am difficult? VARINKA. Oh, they’ll say he is difficult because he is highly intelligent. All great men are difficult. Look at Lermontov, Tchaikovsky, Peter the Great. BYELINKOV. Ivan the Terrible. (Note: Mikhail Lennoatov (1814-1841),poet and novelist; Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893), eotnposer; Peter the Great (1672-1725) and Ivan the Terrible (1530-1584), oars credited with making Russia a great European power. VARINKA. Yes, him too. BYELINKOV. Why are you marrying me? I am none of these things. VARINKA. To me you are. BYELINKOV. You have imagined this. You have constructed an elaborate romance for yourself. Perhaps you are the great one. You are the one with the great imagination. VARINKA. Byelinkov, I am a pretty girl of thirty. You’ re right, I am not a woman. I have not made myself into a woman because I do not deserve that honor. Until I came to this town to visit my brother I lived on my family’s farm. As the years passed I became younger and younger in fear that I would never marry.

And it wasn’ t that I wasn’t pretty enough or sweet enough, it was just that no man ever looked at me and saw a wife. I was not the woman who would be there when he came home. Until I met you I thought I would lie all my life and say I never married because I never met a man I loved. I will love you, Byelinkov. And I will help you to love me. We deserve the life everyone else has. We deserve not to be different. BYELINKOV. Yes. We are the same as everyone else. VARINKA. Tell me you love me. BYELINKOV. I love you. VARINKA (takes his hands. ) We will be very happy. I am very strong. Pauses. ) It is time for tea. BYELINKOV. It is too early for tea. Tea is at half past the hour. VARINKA. Do you have heavy cream? It will be awfully nice with apricots. BYELINKOV. Heavy cream is too rich for teatime. VARINKA. But today is special. Today you placed a lilac in my hair. Write in your note pad. Every year we will celebrate with apricots and heavy cream. I will go to my brother’s house and get some. BYELINKOV. But your brother’s house is a mile from here. VARINKA. Today it is much shorter. Today my brother gave me his bicycle to ride. I will be back very soon. BYELINKOV.

You rode to my house by bicycle! Did anyone see you! VARINKA. Of course. I had such fun. I told you I saw the grocery store lady with the son-in-law who is doing very well thank you in Moscow, and the headmaster’s wife. BYELINKOV. You saw the headmaster’s wife! VARINKA. She smiled at me. BYELINKOV. Did she laugh or smile? VARINKA. She laughed a little. She said, “My dear, you are very progressive to ride a bicycle. ” She said you and your fiance Byelinkov must ride together sometime. I wonder if he’ll take off his galoshes when he rides a bicycle. BYELINKOV. She said that? VARINKA.

She adores you, We had a good giggle. BYELINKOV. A woman can be arrested for riding a bicycle. That is not progressive, it is a premeditated revolutionary act. Your brother must be awfully, awfully careful on behalf of your behavior. He has been careless-oh so care-less-in giving you the bicycle. VARINKA. Dearest Byelinkov, you are wrapping yourself under curtains and quilts! I made friends on the bicycle. BYELINKOV. You saw more than the headmaster’s wife and the idiot grocery woman. VARINKA. She is not an idiot. BYELINKOV. She is a potato-Vending, sausage-armed fool! VARINKA. Shhh!

My school mouse. Shhh! BYELINKOV. What other friends did you make on this bicycle? VARINKA. I saw students from my brother’ s classes. They waved and shouted, Anthropos in love! Anthropos in ‘love!! ” BYELINKOV. Where is that bicycle? VARINKA. I left it outside the gate. Where are you going? BYELINKOV (muttering as he exits. ) Anthropos in love, an thropos in love! VARINKA. They were cheering me on. Careful, you’ll trample the roses. BYELINKOV (returning with the bicycle. ) Anthropos is the Greek singular for man. Anthropos in love translates as the Greek and Latin master in love.

Of course they cheered you. Their instructor, who teaches them the discipline and contained beauty of the classics, is in love with a sprite on a bicycle. It is a good giggle, isn’t it? A very good giggle! I am returning this bicycle to your brother. VARINKA. But it is teatime. BYELINKOV. Today we will not’ have tea. VARINKA. But you will have to walk back a mile. BYELINKOV. I have my galoshes on. (Gets on the bicycle. ), Varinka, we deserve not to be different. (Begins to pedal. The bicycle doesn’t move. ) VARINKA. Put the kickstand up. BYELINKOV. I beg your pardon.

VARINKA (giggling. ) Byelinkov, to make the bicycle move; you must put the kickstand up. (Byelinkov puts it up and awkwardly falls off the bicycle as it. moves. ) (Laughing. ) Ha ha ha. My little school mouse. You. look so funny! You are the sweetest dearest man in the world. Ha ha ha! (Pause. ) BYELINKOV. Please help me up. I’m afraid my galosh is caught. VARINKA (trying not to laugh. ) . Your galosh is caught! (Explodes in laughter again. ) Oh, you are so funny! I do love you so. (Helps Byelinkov up. ) You were right, my pet, as always. We don’t need heavy cream for tea.

The fraction of improvement isn’ t worth the damage caused by the disruption. BYELINKOV. Varinka, it is still too early for tea. I must complete two stanzas of my translation before late afternoon. That is my regular schedule. VARINKA. Then I will watch while you work. BYELINKOV. No. You had a good giggle. That is enough. VARINKA. Then while you work I will work too. I will make lists of guests for our wedding. BYELINKOV. I can concentrate only when I am alone in my house. Please take your bicycle home to your brother. VARINKA. But I don’t want to leave, you. You look so sad. BYELINKOV.

I never was a sad man. Don’t ever think I was a sad man. VARINKA. Byelinkov, it’s a beautiful day, we are in your garden. The roses are in bloom. BYELINKOV: Allow me to help you on to your bicycle. (Takes,Varinka’s hand as she gets on the bike. ) VARINKA. You are such a gentleman. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. You are very strong. Good day, Varinka. ( Varinka pedals off-Byelinkov, alone in the garden, takes out his pad and rips up the note about the lilac, strews it over the garden, then carefully picks up each piece of paper and places them all in a small envelope as lights fade to black. Based on the dialogue above, we can analyze some function of this dialogue : •To recall For this point, it really depend on the individual of the audience. By this function, the audience can remind something both from the story and out the story. •To Speculate In my opinion, I can’t talk about this function so much, because I think it is really realted to the level of curiosity and interest of someone. If the theme of this drama is intresting for them, people will try to speculate what will happen next.

From the dialogue point of view itself, I think the intresting one is the audience will try to predict how come the really different people can be together, and finally the audience will have their own speculation about what will happen next. •To Provide Necessary Factual Information By this point, the dialogue of “The Man in a Case” give us information, such as the characters, those are Byelinkov and Viranka. The dialogue also give us information about the location of the event of the drama. BYELINKOV. And turn. Give me your hand. You dance like a school mouse. It’s a beautiful afternoon! We are in my garden. The roses are in full bloom!

And turn. And turn. It also is clearly stated on the last part (action) of the dialogue : “( Varinka pedals off-Byelinkov, alone in the garden, takes out his pad and rips up the note about the lilac, strews it over the garden, then carefully picks up each piece of paper and places them all in a small envelope as lights fade to black. )” •To Foreshadow If we talk about identifying the key point or theme of the drama, the dialogue above has this function. We can see it directly how “love story” is the main part that is showed so much by the author. … BYELINKOV. Being married requires a great deal of responsibility.

I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children. We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. VARINKA. You are so sweet! You are the sweetest man in the world! …. At this chunk of dialogue, we can see that Byelinkov show his love by an unique ways, he tend to consider abou how to make his wife special in social life context. In the other hand, Valinka is more simple. As long as she is stay with Byelinkov, it is enough for her.

By this illustration, we know that love shows itself in different ways. … VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. It is convenient we met. VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. You are a girl. VARINKA. I am thirty. BYELINKOV. But you think like a girl. That is an attractive attribute. VARINKA. Do you love me? … The chunk of the dialogue above show that the effort of varinka that tries to show to Byelinkov how she love him so much by saying “I love you” many times. In this situation, Varinka also tries to convince herself that Byelinkov also love her. And once again, the dialogue shows that the key point or theme of this dialogue is love. To Characterize From all of the function of a dialogue, I think this function can be found easily in this dialogue. Based on the dialogue above, Byelinkov is a kind of person who is well-educated, meticulous, worrisome, tedious and conservative. I think he is a kind of flat character. In the other hand, Varinka is a dynamic character. She can simply shows her happiness and excitement for being married to Byelinkov. She can say her love to Byelinkov easily. The characteristics of those characters can found easily in some parts of dialogue, such as : BYELINKOV. You are ten minutes late. VARINKA.

The most amazing thing happened on my way over here. You know the woman who runs the grocery store down the road. She wears a black wig during the week, and a blond wig on Saturday nights. And she has the daughter who married an engineer in Moscow who is doing very well thank you and is living, God bless them, in a three-room apartment. But he really is the most boring man in the world: All he talks about is his future and his station in life. Well, she heard we were to be married and she gave me this basket of apricots to give to you. … From this part we can see that Byelinkov criticize about Valinka’s 10 minutes late.

It shows that Byelinkov is censorious person. But Valinka seems okay, normally other people won’t accept it. I think if a woman is blinded by love, she will be careless for thing like that. … BYELINKOV. I am a responsible man. Every day I have for breakfast black bread, fruit, hot tea, and every day I smile three times. I am halfway into my translation of the Aeneid (note: Latin epic poem by the Roman poet Virgil (70-19B. C. ) from classical Greek hexameter into Russian alexandrines. In twenty yeas I have never been late to school: l am a responsible man, but no dancing bear. …

By the part, we know that Byelinkov is a kind of person who always do a routine thing, and he is a conservative person I think. This characteristic of Byelinkov is also reflected in this dialogue : … BYELINKOV. Varinka, I don’t like change very much. If one works out the arithmetic, the final fraction of improvement is at best less than an eighth of value over the total damage caused by disruption. I never thought of marrying till I saw your eyes dancing among the familiar faces at the headmaster’s tea. I assumed I would grow old preserved like those, which are left over, wrapped suitably in my case of curtains and quilts. . He also has an unique concept about marriage that make me confuse. It shows that Byelinkov is a very narrow-minded, conservative, traditional, flat, and little bit freak I think. We can find it in this dialogue : … BYELINKOV. Being married requires a great deal of responsibility. I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children. We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. …

In the other hand, Varinka is a dymanic person. She can easily express her feelings. … VARINKA. Byelinkov, I am a pretty girl of thirty. You’ re right, I am not a woman. I have not made myself into a woman because I do not deserve that honor. Until I came to this town to visit my brother I lived on my family’s farm. As the years passed I became younger and younger in fear that I would never marry. And it wasn’ t that I wasn’t pretty enough or sweet enough, it was just that no man ever looked at me and saw a wife. I was not the woman who would be there when he came home.

Until I met you I thought I would lie all my life and say I never married because I never met a man I loved. I will love you, Byelinkov. And I will help you to love me. We deserve the life everyone else has. We deserve not to be different. … In contrast, Byelinkov is a kind of person who couldn’t express his feelings, eventhough about his love. … VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. It is convenient we met. VARINKA. I love you. BYELINKOV. You are a girl. VARINKA. I am thirty. BYELINKOV. But you think like a girl. That is an attractive attribute. VARINKA. Do you love me? BYELINKOV.

We’ve never spoken about housekeeping. … Based on the chunks above, we know that Byelinkov is a person who think that expressing love is strange, it is very conservative and traditional. B. Story ( Plot ) •Begin / Exposition The story begin with the main characters, Byelinkov and Varinka have a date in a garden. Varinka comes to the garden which Byelinkov have waited her and Varinka late for 10 minutes. Then, varinka told a stroy about why she is late. BYELINKOV. You are ten minutes late. VARINKA. The most amazing thing happened on my way over here. You know the woman who runs the grocery store down the road.

She wears a black wig during the week, and a blond wig on Saturday nights. And she has the daughter who married an engineer in Moscow who is doing very well thank you and is living, God bless them, in a three-room apartment. But he really is the most boring man in the world: All he talks about is his future and his station in life. Well, she heard we were to be married and she gave me this basket of apricots to give to you. … •Rising Action / Complication The conflict occurs because of the internal case of the main characters, especially Byelinkov who is very strict, conservative, and traditional.

It starts to occur when Byelinkov state his characteristics from his behavior and the way of thinking. For example : … BYELINKOV. Being married requires a great deal of responsibility. I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children. We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. … BYELINKOV. You are fond of expletives. VARINKA. My beet soup, sir, is excellent! BYELINKOV. Please don’ t be cross.

I too am an excellent housekeeper. I have a place for everything in the house. A shelf for each pot, a cubby for every spoon, a folder for favorite recipes. I have cooked for myself for twenty years. Though my beet soup is not outstanding, it is suffcient. … •Crisis / Climax The climax occurs because the concervative way of thinking of Byelinkov that can not accept new ideas and strict to the traditional way of thinking. He concern too much about what people think about him. It cold be shown in the dialogue when Byelinkov know that Varinka ride a bicycle to get him, and he can’t tolerate it. .. VARINKA. She laughed a little. She said, “My dear, you are very progressive to ride a bicycle. ” She said you and your fiance Byelinkov must ride together sometime. I wonder if he’ll take off his galoshes when he rides a bicycle. BYELINKOV. She said that? VARINKA. She adores you, We had a good giggle. BYELINKOV. A woman can be arrested for riding a bicycle. That is not progressive, it is a premeditated revolutionary act. Your brother must be awfully, awfully careful on behalf of your behavior. He has been careless-oh so care-less-in giving you the bicycle. … •Falling Action

The crisis begins to fall when Byelinkov decided to return the bicycle to Varinka’s brother. Suddenly there is a funny event there. Byelinkov tried to put the kickstand off and then fell awkwardly, and the thing that Byelinkov consider at the moment was his galoshes. … VARINKA (giggling. ) Byelinkov, to make the bicycle move; you must put the kickstand up. (Byelinkov puts it up and awkwardly falls off the bicycle as it. moves. ) (Laughing. ) Ha ha ha. My little school mouse. You. look so funny! You are the sweetest dearest man in the world. Ha ha ha! (Pause. ) BYELINKOV. Please help me up. I’m afraid my galosh is caught.

VARINKA (trying not to laugh. ) . Your galosh is caught! (Explodes in laughter again. ) Oh, you are so funny! I do love you so. (Helps Byelinkov up. ) You were right, my pet, as always. We don’t need heavy cream for tea. The fraction of improvement isn’ t worth the damage caused by the disruption. … •Resolution In the end of the drama, I can not get clear ending, especially about Byelinkov feeling, if Byelinkov was happy about his relationship with Varinka or not. At least, something that I can get for resolution of this drama is Byelinkov and Varinka adore each other although there are so many differences among them.

We can see it in this dialogue : … BYELINKOV: Allow me to help you on to your bicycle. (Takes,Varinka’s hand as she gets on the bike. ) VARINKA. You are such a gentleman. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. You are very strong. Good day, Varinka. … C. Conflict The main problem in which “The Man in a Case” told about is the way of thinking of the main character, Byelinkov. He is a concervative, traditional, and ridiculous person (which has been explained above in analyzing of dialogue in the function :“to characterized”).

His characteristics made him in little bit in trouble because of the characteristics of his girlfriend is totally different from him. (which has been explained above in analyzing of dialogue in the function : “to characterized”). These two people are getting married soon and of course this different characteristics caused the internal conflict. D. Setting This drama taken place in a garden in a village, in the year 1898. Based on the dialogue, the function setting is for background to describe the place and time where and when the story happen.

There are some parts of the dialogue that can show the location of this drama, such as: … BYELINKOV. And turn. Give me your hand. You dance like a school mouse. It’s a beautiful afternoon! We are in my garden. The roses are in full bloom! And turn. And turn. It also is clearly stated on the last part (action) of the dialogue : “( Varinka pedals off-Byelinkov, alone in the garden, takes out his pad and rips up the note about the lilac, strews it over the garden, then carefully picks up each piece of paper and places them all in a small envelope as lights fade to black. ” … •Characters a. Based on the main part or roles in the story, we can conclude that Byelinkov and Varinka are the main / major characters. We know that the whole story is told about them. b. Based on the kinds of characters, it is obvious that both Varinka and Byelinkov are protagonist in different characteristics. Byelinkov tend to be flat character and Varinka is a dynamic one. c. Based on the possibility to change, in my opinion both of them are the static characters. They still remain the same from the begining to the end of the story. . Based on the description of the characters, we can find it in the dialogue. From the way of thinking, we can conclude that Byelinkov is a concervative, traditional, ridiculous, dicipline, and flat person. In contrast, Varinka is a dynamic and humorous person. (which has been explained above in analyzing of dialogue in the function : “to characterized”) E. Theme From the dialogue we can conclude that the theme of “The Man in a Case” is love. For example, we can find it in this part : … BYELINKOV.

Being married requires a great deal of responsibility. I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy. BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children. We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. VARINKA. You are so sweet! You are the sweetest man in the world! …. III. Conclusion In my opinion, this is a sweet romantic love story. How the differences between two people means nothing if there is love between them.

Varinka who tends to be dynamic and humorous can accept Byelinkov who is concervative and traditional, and still fascinating and intresting for her. Relatively, nowadays, it is so hard to find such a woman who still can respond positively for every action that a man do. I am sure that love is a topic that everybody will apreciate at. Somewhere, I think there are so many love story with so many differences, different culture, different social background, etc. Later on, something that we can learn from the drama “The Man in a Case” is life is short, and we do find our love, it is obvious that we should go for it.

Cite this The Man in a Case

The Man in a Case. (2016, Oct 14). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/the-man-in-a-case/

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