Theories Regarding Ice Man’s Death

The various theories put forward to explain the circumstances surrounding the Ice Man’s death are plausible, although inconclusive. The initial theory was devised by K. Spindler, which consisted of the idea that the Ice Man was a shepherd who fled his village post conflict; although this theory is heavily based on assumption. The subsequent theory was that of Tom Loy, who theorised that the Ice Man was a hunter that had been injured after a territorial dispute that he had encountered, and eventually passed as a result; however this theory presents inconclusive framework.

The final theory was presented by Eduart Egarter-Vigal and Walter Leitner, who suggest that the Ice Man was professionally executed (idea drawn from significant wounds and scarring) due to a power struggle in his village; this also presents inconclusive evidence and trace of speculation. The primary theory was devised by Konrad Spindler, which consisted of the idea that Ice Man was a shepherd who had fled his village as a result of disturbed peace in his village. Spindler supports his idea of a disturbance in the village by noting that the times of harvest were the focal points for invading villages in search for goods and food.

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In saying this, Spindler further states that the Ice Man must have been involved in the conflict, was injured, and was forced to flee the village; this statement, in particular, was based on assumption. The location of Ice Man’s village was further speculated by Spindler by stating that he was settled in Val Venosta. This act of irresponsibility was dangerous, as it may have provided opportunity for scholarly debate, as it may also be Remedello. Perhaps, this was intentional.

Spindler produced evidentiary support by noting a discovery of a mass grave in Talheim, Germany, ‘proving’ the fact that individuals in this settlement were attacked/involved in the dispute. Based on the evidentiary finds and traces of speculation, Spindler provided a theory stating that the Ice Man was a shepherd that had passed as a result of injuries from a disturbance; although all statements present and inconclusive theory. The succeeding theory was that of Tom Loy, which explores the possibility that the Ice Man was a hunter that had passed due to injuries sustained in a territorial dispute.

In this theory, Loy presents the idea that, due to the findings of a separate human DNA found on the Ice Man’s clothing, and a wound that had been stitched up on the Ice Man’s back, the Ice Man had been travelling with a companion. He supports this notion by recognising the stitch work presented on the Ice Man’s back, and stating that it was virtually impossible that the Ice Man could have treated himself after sustaining a wound from an arrow in such a place. After stating this, Loy declares the event of his death after being treated as a result of blood loss.

This theory presented by Tom Loy relies heavily on the basis of assumption regarding the initial declaration of the Ice Man’s occupation. This is due to the fact that the evidence provided (weapons, Ibex bones and animal DNA on the dagger) may have also been acquired if the Ice Man had a different lifestyle choice. The recount of the manner of which the Ice Man had died, which according to Loy, was slow and extremely painful, was also based on pure speculation, as Tom Loy was not an eye-witness of the account of the Ice Man’s death.

As a result of the mere speculation and assumption presented by Tom Loy such as the Ice Man’s occupation and manner of death, an inconclusive theory is produced. The theory produced by Eduart Egarter-Vigal and Walter Leitner revolve around the idea that the Ice Man was victim to a professional execution due to power struggles in his village. In this theory, the evidence of the arrowhead wound on the Ice Man’s lower back being stitched up was an indication that the assassin that had murdered the Ice Man had ‘covered his tracks’ by breaking off the arrow shaft and stitching the wound.

Due to the fact that Egarter-Vigal and Leitner had possession of advanced technology such as the high resolution multi-slice scanning machine, they were able to discover that the location of the arrow wound on the Ice Man’s back was in the area that the subclavian artery (the main circulatory pipeline carrying fresh oxygenated blood from the pumping chamber of the heart to the left arm) belongs to; further supporting the idea that the Ice Man was executed by an assassin, as it illustrates experience. The manner of the Ice Man’s death, however, differs to any other theory mentioned.

This is stated as a result of the piercing of the subclavian artery, causing the Ice Man to have had a quick death due to rapid blood loss, as opposed to a slow, painful death. The cause of these wounds were, as stated by Egarter-Vigal and Leitner, as a result of a political dispute that formed in the Ice Man’s village, and the wound sustained was cause by the individuals in his own tribe. The evidentiary support that was provided by Leitner stating that the Ice Man “didn’t believe that his reign was coming to an end and was holding on to his osition” is that of a hand wound, demonstrating the manner of which he ‘held his ground’ in the political conflict. This idea, however, is of pure speculation, as the hand wound could have been sustained in a way other than the way stated. The evidence produced by Eduart Egarter-Vigal and Walter Leitner provide no opportunity for a conclusive theory, as the theory of the Ice Man being subject to an execution from an assassin due to political disputes is purely based on speculation and assumption.

In summation, the theories presented that explain the circumstances surrounding the Ice Man’s death are plausible, although inconclusive. The initial theory presented by Spindler speculated that the Ice Man was a shepherd who fled his village post dispute. The subsequent theory provided by Tom Loy theorised that the Ice Man was a hunter that had been injured after a territorial dispute that he had encountered, and eventually passed as a result. The final theory by Eduart Egarter-Vigal and Walter Leitner suggests that the Ice Man was professionally executed due to a power struggle in his village.

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