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The Lady with the Pet Dog Essays

The same story two different points of view “The Lady with the Pet Dog” initially written by Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) and later on written by Joyce Carol Oats (B. 1938). The story of two lovers, seen by a man with a Romanticism style, and 100 years later written by a woman in the post modern time. This pieces show is how different can be a story when is told in a different gender on a different time frame. The first difference in this story is about the authors. Initially the story was written by Anton Chekhov who was born in a small town in Russia and his original language was Russian.
In contrast Joyce Carol Oats was an American author, raised in upstate New York and her native language is English. For this reason Chekhov’s story takes place in Yalta, a resort town on the Black Sea, during summer time. While Oats place the characters at Anna’s family home in Nantucket, Massachusetts. In Chekhov’s story Anna’s husband was described as a “young man with small side whiskers, bald and flunky. More over, Anna did not know for sure where her husband works, suggesting that they have not good communication or the lack interests for this wife.
Probably this was the husband whom at Yalta, in an excess of better feeling she had called a Flunkey” Chekhov (212). In contrast, Oats describes Anna’s husband as a very attentive with her, they talk about his daily life and care about her. “Her husband told her of his own loneliness, his worries about his bussiness, his health, his mother” Oates (222). “He talks to her always about his plans, his problems, his business friend, his future” Oats (222). When the story was told by Chekhov is from a male (Gurov) point of view only. The reader never knows Anna’s side of the Gurov’s story.
Chekhov tells the story in chronological order. “Chekhov develops a conventional, sequential plot” Brennan said, while Oates creates a circle (Brenan continued to say “… but if Chekhov’s is linear, hers is circular”. Oats also unveils Anna’s feelings in this lover’s relationship “Chekhov privileges Gurov, he represents Anna’s feelings only when she speaks to Gurov” according with Bernnan. Oats presents what Chekhov leaves and – the female experience – and so relegates the male lover (who in her versions is nameless) to the limited status chekhov relegates Anna.
Oats privileges the point of view of Anna” Bernnan said. The Lady with the Pet Dog is a story about marriage and infidelities where strong feelings keep the lovers together along the time and despite they live in different cities. The story has is told by two authors with changing different gender and in a different time frame, changing the perspective of the story. Chekhov the original author wrote the story from his male character (Gurov) view. When Oats took Anna with her female point of view enriched the story with her emotional experience. The detail switch around the main character according with the author.
Works Cited

Byerman Keith E. “Anger in a Small Place: Jamaica Kincaid’s Cultural critique of Antigua.” College Literature 22.1 (Feb. 1995): 91-103. Rpt. in Contemporary Literature Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 137. Detroit: Gale Group, 2001. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 16 June 2011. Simmons, Diane. “The Rhythm of Reality in the Works of Jamaica Kincaid.” World Literature Today 68.3 (Summer 1994): 466-472. Rpt. in Literature of Developing Nations for Students: Presenting Analysis, Context, and Criticism on Literature of Developing Nations. Ed. Elizabeth Bellalouna, Michael L. LaBlanc, and Ira Mark Milne. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale Group, 2000. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 16 June 2011.

 

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