Interpersonal Communication Assignment Essay

Also includes features of environments that affect interaction: personal objects such as jewelry and clothes; physical appearance; and facial expressions. The complex system of nonverbal communication includes kinesics, hepatics, physical appearance, artifacts, environmental features, space, Chronics, Paraguayan, and silence. (p. 1 18, 126-134)] 1. Hepatics – The sense of touch and what it means. Hepatics are part of nonverbal communicators. 2. Physical Appearance – Face to face interactions, most of us notice how others look, and we often base our initial evaluations of others on their appearance.

3.

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Artifacts – A personal object that we use to announce our identity and personalize our environment. 4 Environmental Factors – Elements of settings that affect how we feel and act. For example, we respond to architecture, colors, room design, temperature, sounds, smells, and lighting. 5. Proteomics and Personal Space – An aspect of nonverbal communication that includes space and our uses of it. 6. Chronics – The aspect of nonverbal communication that involves our perceptions and use of time to define identities and interaction. 7. Paraguayan – Vocal communication, such as accents and inflection that goes not use words.

. Silence – A final type of nonverbal behavior is silence, which can communicate powerful messages. Kinesics: Body position and body motions, including those of the face. (p. 126) [Expanded definition: The textbook states kinesics refers to body position and body motions, including those of the face. Clearly, we signal a great deal about how we feel and see ourselves by how we hold our bodies. (p. 126)] Paraguayan: Vocal communication, such as accents and inflection that does not use words. (p. 133) [Expanded definition: The communication that is vocal but does not use words.

It includes sounds, such as murmurs and gasps, and vocal qualities, such as volume, pitch, and inflection. Paraguayan also includes accents, pronunciation, and the complexity of sentences. (p. 133)] Proteomics and Personal Space: An aspect of nonverbal communication that includes space and our Uses of it. (p. 132) [Expanded definition: The textbook states proteomics refers to space and how we use it. Every culture has norms that prescribe how people should use space, how close people should be to one another, and how much space different people are entitled to have. (p. 132)] Answer A.

Dry. Chug is exhibiting many different nonverbal behaviors to Ms. Ryder during their conversation and Dry. Chug is ultimately presenting a lack of attentiveness or interest in her. The nonverbal behaviors that Dry. Chug is demonstrating are reflecting the cultural understandings and values and also express his personal identity and feelings toward his patient. As Dry. Chug enters the room his proteomics and personal space between him and the patient is quite a large gap. When seeing the desk in the photo it is clear that it is quite a distance between the patient and the doctor’s chair.

The personal space between the doctor and patient should be correct when a doctor and patient talk. If this is not the case, a feeling of uneasiness can arise, which can lead to a serious disturbance of the discussion. The most successful discussion between Dry. Chug and Ms. Ryder depend on both of them finding each other at a distance that they unconsciously perceive as correct. There is also a symbolic meaning to the distance between people, and this is why it counts as one of the nonverbal behaviors. Dry.

Chugs face and body position (kinesics) are showing surprise with his upper eyelids and brow rising, his lips are tightened together showing some confusion, and his posture is relaxed. “Ms. Ryder, there’s good news. All the tests we did show you are normal. ” All of Dry. Chugs nonverbal behaviors are indicating that he is satisfied that the test results are normal and there is nothing wrong. The Paraguayan that could be interpreted as a lack of attentiveness or interest in the patient are when Dry. Chug tells the patient, “According to the tests, you have no medical problems.

Perhaps your fatigue is emotional. This is common in women your age. Would you like a referral for counseling? ” “Ms. Ryder, there’s no need to get hysterical. I assure you I know how to read test results, and physically you are quite normal. “l wish I could help you. ” Everything that Dry. Chug says to Ms. Ryder after a certain point in their conversation comes off cold and giving off the impression he is not interested in the patient’s well-being. When Dry. Chug tells Ms. Ryder to not be hysterical, he is showing a clear lack of attentiveness to how she feels about being tired all the time. 394 words) Personal Example [1st of 3] (kinesics) – My friend Kathleen and I have been friends for a while and we always make a point to take time and see each other with our busy schedules to keep up on our lives. I was listening to her complain, yet again, bout her boyfriend. This is nothing new because since I have known Kathleen there have been many boyfriends that were ‘the one”. I had been hearing the same story for weeks, and I had politely asked if it were possible to discuss something else. However, she went on and I involuntarily rolled my eyes during her discussion.

She immediately picked up on my kinesics, which was that I had heard enough of this topic and I was no longer interested. Before we left to go our separate ways for another week, I made it a point to tell her sorry for rolling my eyes about her conversation because I did not want her to think that I did not are about her relationship. She understood were I was coming from then explained she just was so frustrated and needed to vent to about the situation. Sometimes our kinesics can get us into trouble if we are not with people who will take it light heartedly. (207 words) Q. (A) How does Ms.

Ryder nonverbal communication change during her conversation with Dry. Chug? (B) To what would you attribute the changes? Nonverbal communication: All forms of expressions. The complex system of nonverbal communication includes kinesics, hepatics, physical appearance, artifacts, environmental features, space, kook, and we often base our initial evaluations of others on their appearance. 3. Artifacts – A personal object that we use to announce our identity and personalize our environment. 4. Environmental Factors – Elements of settings involves our perceptions and use of time to define identities and interaction. . Paraguayan – Vocal communication, such as accents and inflection that does not use words. 8. Silence -A final type of nonverbal behavior is silence, which can communicate powerful messages. Chronics: The aspect of nonverbal communication that involves our perceptions and use of time to define identities ND interaction. (p. 133) [Expanded definition: The textbook states Chronics refers to how we perceive and use time to define identities and interaction. In Western culture, there is a norm that important people with high status can keep others waiting.

Conversely, people with low status are expected to be punctual. (p. 133)] Hepatics: The sense of touch and what it means. Hepatics are part of nonverbal communication (p. 128) [Expanded definition: The textbook defines hepatics referring to the sense of touch. Many scholars believe that touching and being touched are essential to a healthy life. Touching also communicates power ND status. People with high status touch others and invade other’ spaces more than people with less status do. (p. 128)] Immediacy: Behavior that increases perceptions of closeness between communicators. P. 1 22) [Expanded definition: One dimension of relationship-level meaning that is often conveyed by nonverbal communication is responsiveness. Key to responsiveness is immediacy, which is behavior that increases perceptions of closeness between communicators. In face-to-face interaction, immediacy behaviors include smiling, making eye contact, head nodding, and attentive posture. (p. 122)] Answer A. Ms. Rider’s face is showing how nervous, worried, and uncertain she is about the results from the medical tests. Looking at Ms.

Ryder body language she is sending intricate messages of uncertainty by her raised eyebrows, nervousness by her eyes shifting and her hands being crossed, and wordiness by her mouth being downturn and lips pressed together. “Fatigue has nothing to do with my age. I’m only 35, and felt fine 6 months ago. I’m telling you, this isn’t normal. ” “I just told you I am sleeping more, and it’s not helping. What I need to know is….. “Ms. Ryder is communicating her immediacy to Dry. Chug by her posture leaning back and this is presenting she is not enjoying being in the office anymore.

Ms. Ryder is making it clear to the doctor that this is not some age related matter and there is something wrong with her that needs to be fixed. At the beginning of the conversation, Ms. Ryder is clearly responding in a confused way because she knows that her energy levels are becoming depleted for no reason and wants to know the answer. When the doctor refers to her age as a cause for this energy decrease she does not take the comment to well and starts answering in a more agitated manner. (21 8 words) Answer B

According to the chronics of standard practices it is the norm to have to wait, sometimes a good while, to see a physician, even if you have an appointment. This conveys the message that physician’s time is more valuable than yours. When looking at Ms. Rider’s facial expression and posture from a different perspective could be comprehended as frustration from waiting so long for the doctor. The frustration eventually turns to nervousness, being worried, and uncertainty because of the time spent sitting in his office waiting on the answer to her problems.

The different changes in Ms. Rider’s nonverbal communication ruing her conversation with Dry. Chug are attributed to the lack of interest and attentiveness that Dry. Chug is giving off in the conversation. Next, to attribute to the change in nonverbal communication is the power and higher status that Dry. Chug indicates with his hepatics of holding the clipboard while walking in the room are displaying that he is satisfied with the tests ran and cannot do anything else for the patient. There are many attributing factors that are changing Ms.

Rider’s nonverbal communication during her conversation, such as, Dry. Chug’s kinesics, Paraguayan, proteomics, and hepatics. Ms. Ryder is changing her nonverbal communication because she is not receiving the help or answers that she wants to hear. (218 words) Personal Example [2nd of 3] (hepatics) – When Twilight first came out I was the first one to say that it was so dumb how people were obsessing over the books and movies. I declared I would never watch any of the movies because the story line I had heard through people sounded absolutely idiotic.

Well unfortunately I was home on a Sunday night with nothing to do and there was nothing on TV except different movies. I saw the Twilight movie and looked for anything else that would interest me, but alas nothing so I darted watching it and became hooked. Now have seen all the movies and could not wait to see the last movie. Looking back the first one is still my guilty pleasure of the four and can relate to this form of nonverbal communication through one of the scenes. As soon as Bella walks into the room, Edwards eyes basically pop out of his head.

He continues to awkwardly stare at her for the remainder of the scene. The gaze can be seen to give power to the observer over the observed. Through the scene, as the camera zooms in and out on Edwards face we see that his eyes are almost completely black which should signal interest because his pupils are dilated. This idea though, that he find Bella attractive, is contrasted by the rest of his nonverbal movements, as they only display disgust; such as, nonverbal cues like hepatics and facial displays. Edwards quickly covers his mouth, which makes the viewer, and Bella, think that he wants to throw up… Eternally at the sight of her. Throughout the rest of the scene, Edwards facial displays of disgust (a downturn mouth and other movements) lead the viewer and Bella to assume that she smells bad. Belle’s nonverbal responses to Edwards actions are just as comical. Through hepatics, she shows self-focused behaviors… That relay nervousness”. She at one point even checks to make sure that her hair and armpits don’t smell. (328 words) Q. Based on what you have learned about effective interpersonal communication from (A) this and (B) previous chapters, what feedback would you give to Dry.

Chug so that he can communicate more effectively with patients? Nonverbal communication: All forms of communication other and words themselves. Includes inflection and other vocal qualities, hepatics, and several other behaviors. (p. 1 18) [Expanded definition: All aspects of communication other than words. It includes not only sutures and body language but also how we utter words: inflection, pauses, tone, volume, and accent. Also includes features of environments that affect interaction: personal objects such as jewelry and clothes; physical appearance; and facial expressions.

The complex system of nonverbal communication includes kinesics, hepatics, physical appearance, artifacts, environmental features, space, Chronics, Paraguayan, and silence. (p. 118, 126-134)] 1. Hepatics – The sense of touch and what it means. Hepatics are part of nonverbal communicators. 2. Physical Appearance – Face to face interactions, most of us notice how others to use words. 8. Silence – A final type of nonverbal behavior is silence, which can communicate powerful messages. Kinesics: Body position and body motions, including those of the face. (p. 26) [Expanded definition: The textbook states kinesics refers to body position and body motions, including those of the face. Clearly, we signal a great deal about how we feel and see ourselves by how we hold our bodies. (p. 1 26)] Paraguayan: Vocal communication, such as accents and inflection that does not use words. (p. 1 33) [Expanded definition: The communication that is vocal but does not use words. It includes sounds, such as rumors and gasps, and vocal qualities, such as volume, pitch, and inflection. Paraguayan also includes accents, pronunciation, and the complexity of sentences. P. 133)] Proteomics and Personal Space: An aspect of nonverbal communication that includes space and our uses of it. (p. 132) [Expanded entitled to have. (p. 132)] Chronics: The aspect of nonverbal communication that involves our perceptions and use of time to define identities and interaction. (p. 133) [Expanded definition: The textbook states Chronics refers to how we perceive and use time to define identities and interaction. In Western culture, here is a norm that important people with high status can keep others waiting. Conversely, people with low status are expected to be punctual. P. 133)] Hepatics: The sense of touch and what it means. Hepatics are part of nonverbal communication (p. 1 28) [Expanded definition: The textbook defines hepatics referring to the sense of touch. Many scholars believe that touching and being touched are essential to a healthy life. Touching also communicates power and status. People with high status touch others and invade other’ spaces more than people with less status do. (p. 128)] Artifacts: A personal object that we use o announce our identity and personalize our environment. (p. 29) [Expanded definition: The personal objects we use to announce our identities and heritage and to personalize our environments. Many people use avatars to symbolize identities in online communication. In face-to-face communication, we craft our image by how we dress and what objects we carry and use. (p. 1 29)] Interpersonal communication competence: i. E. The ability to communicate in ways that are interpersonally effective and appropriate (p. 30) [Expanded definition: The textbook author discusses five guidelines or skills that are closely tied to interpersonal communication competence.

They are (1) developing a range of communication skills; (2) adapting them appropriately to goals, others, and situations; (3) engaging in dual perspective; (4) monitoring communication and its impact; and (5) committing to effective and ethical interpersonal communication. (up. 30-33)] Ego boundaries: An individual’s perception of where he or she stops and the rest of the world begins. (p. 51) [Expanded definition: When an individual stops and the rest of the world begins. Throughout our lives, we continue the process of defining and presenting our identities.

The fact that we continuously evolve is evidence of our capacity for self-renewal and continual growth. (p. 51)J Perception: The active process of selecting, organizing, and interpreting people, objects, events, situations, and activities. (p. 64) [Expanded definition: According to the textbook, perception is the active process of creating meaning by selecting, organizing, and interpreting people, objects, events situations, and other phenomena. Note that perception is defined as an active process. Perception consists of three processes: selecting, organizing, and interpreting. These processes are continuous, so they blend into one another. . 64)] Attribution: An internal account of why something happens or why someone acted a certain way. (p. 70) [Expanded definition: Attributions have four dimensions: locus, stability, specificity, and responsibility. Each dimension has two alternatives and one example: 1. Locus – attributes a person’s actions to a. Internal factors (Example: “He has no patience with people who are late. “) b. External factors (Example: “The traffic jam frustrated him. “) 2. Stability – attributes a person’s actions as a result of a. Stable factors that won’t change over time (Example: “She’s a type A personality. ” ) or b.

Unstable factors that may or will be different at another time (Example: “She acted that way because she has a headache right now. “) 3. Specificity – attributes a person’s behavior as a result of a. Global implications that apply in most or all situations (Example: “He’s a big spender. “) or b. Specific implications that apply only in certain situations or under certain conditions (Example: “He spends money when he is earning a lot. “) 4. Responsibility – attributes a person’s behavior to circumstances a. Within personal control (Example: “She yelled at her child because of lack of effort to control her temper. ) or b. Beyond personal control (Example: “She yelled at her child because of lack of sleep during exam week. “) Communication rules: Shared understandings of what communication means and what behaviors are appropriate in various situations. (p. 95) [Expanded definition: Shared understanding of what communication means and what kinds of communication are appropriate in particular situations. (p. 95)] Answer A After reading Chapter 5: The World Beyond Words, I can confidently say I have learned a great deal of information about effective interpersonal communication.

The feedback I would give to Dry. Chug in this situation is letting him know effective nonverbal communication between patient-practitioner interactions is crucial with any patient. Proper health care demands face-to-face interaction between health providers and their patients. This direct contact is important for two sets of reasons: the provider must assess the special quality and intensity of the patient’s symptoms, emotions and pain (kinesics); and the provider must create positive expectations, provide emotional support, and enlist the patient’s cooperation with treatment.

Regarding medical diagnosis, patients are often unable or unwilling to describe precisely and completely what is rung with them. Regarding medical treatment, a number of factors make kind words and verbal prognoses from practitioners insufficient to communicate the expectations essential to “placebo” effects and the sense of commitment known to be therapeutic to a distraught patient. Effective nonverbal communication through touch, facial expression, voice tone, etc. ?is essential for successful patient-practitioner interaction.

Doctors need to observe patient’s body language that indicates certain feelings and emotions, while also expressing support and empathy for the patient. Nonverbal behavior involves a range of communication activities that do not have linguistic content, including eye contact, facial expressions, head movements (such as nodding), hand gestures, and postural positions. Paraguayan behaviors are also nonverbal, such as the rate, volume, and pitch of speech, pauses, and interruptions. Nonverbal behaviors communicate emotional information, such as joy, sadness, or anxiety, as well as agreement or turn taking in a conversation.

Dry. Chug also needs to aware that less touch by a physician is associated with greater patient satisfaction, possibly because touch can communicate power and dominance (hepatics). The ideal rosaries and personal space between patient-physician for patients is closer distance and less touch. Dry. Chug needs to realize that people craft their image by how they dress and what objects they carry and use. Doctors use artifacts to announce their identity and to project a particular image to their patients that suggest nonverbal cues of liking, interest, and approachability.

These nonverbal cues play a crucial but unappreciated role in the process of medical care. Lastly, Dry. Chug needs to slow down and listen to the patient for a minute. If he would provide information in a slow and deliberate fashion allow the time needed for tenants to comprehend the new information. If the chronics of doctor’s time is decelerated during the office visits with a patient it can be very satisfying for the patient because the patient can relay to the doctor what is going on medically and how it is affecting their life styles. In a nut shell, if Dry.

Chug communicates with patients effectively with simple choices in words, information depth, speech patterns, body position, and facial expression can greatly affect the quality of one-to-one communication between the patient and physician. These are conscious choices that can be learned and customized by the hysteria to fit patients. If Dry. Chug learns these skills he will be avoiding communication pitfalls and can sharpen basic communication skills that will help strengthen the patient-physician bond. (531 words) Answer B Dry. Chug needs to cultivate interpersonal communication competence to communicate effectively and appropriately.

No single style of communication is best in all circumstances, with all people, or for pursing all goals. Because what is effective varies, we need to have a broad repertoire of communication behaviors. There are five guidelines or skills that are closely tied to interpersonal immunization competence. They are (1) developing a range of communication skills; (2) adapting them appropriately to goals, others, and situations; (3) engaging in dual perspective; (4) monitoring communication and its impact; and (5) committing to effective and ethical interpersonal communication.

There is not one single set of skills that compose interpersonal communication competence, this is why people need to develop a range of communication abilities. The ability to communicate in a range of ways doesn’t make us competent unless we also know which kinds of communication to use in specific interactions. Although here is no “correct” way for adapting communication appropriately, it’s generally important to consider personal goals, context, and the people with whom we communicate. Appropriately adapted communication, then, is sensitive to goals, contexts, and other people.

Central to competent interpersonal communication is the ability to engage in dual perspective, which understands both our own, and another person’s perspective, beliefs, thoughts, or feelings. When we adopt dual perspective, we understand how someone else thinks and feels about issues. Another ability that affects interpersonal communication competence is monitoring your communication, which is the capacity to observe and regulate your own communication when interacting with others. Monitoring occurs both before and during interaction.

Our ability to monitor allows us to adapt communication in advance and gauge our effectiveness as we interact. The final requirement for interpersonal competence is commitment to effective and ethical communication. This commitment requires that you invest energy in communicating ethically with others as unique human beings. A commitment to effective and ethical communication also requires you to respect yourself and our ideas and feelings. Next, Dry. Chug needs to learn about ego boundaries, communication, and personal identity.

Through communication, we learn and import social perspectives – those of particular others and those of the generalized other, or society as a whole. Reflected appraisals, direct definitions, and social comparisons are communication processes that shape how we see ourselves and how we change over time. When we resist counterproductive social views, we promote change in society. Guidelines for improving self-concept are to make a firm commitment to personal growth, to acquire knowledge about sired changes and concrete skill, to set realistic goals, to assess yourself fairly, and to create contexts that support the changes you seek.

Transforming how we see ourselves is not easy, but it is within your reach. We can make amazing changes in who we are and how we feel about ourselves when we embrace our human capacity to make choices. Now looking at the process of Human Perception which is the active process of creating meaning by selecting, phenomena. Perceptions consist of three processes: selecting, organizing, and interpreting. These processes are continuous, so they blend into one another.

They are also interactive, so each of them affects the other two. What we selectively notice affects what we interpret and evaluate. At the same time, our interpretations become a lens that influences what we notice in the world around us. Selection, interpretation, and evaluation interact continuously in the process of perception. Our attributions influence the meanings we attach to others and to their communication. An attribution is an explanation of why something happened or why someone acts a certain way.

Attributions have four dimensions: locus which attributes a person’s actions to internal factors or external factors, stability which explains actions as the result of stable factors that won’t change over time or unstable factors that may or will be different at another time, specificity explains behaviors in terms of whether the behavior has global implications that apply in most or all situations or specific implications that apply online in certain situations or under certain conditions, and responsibility attributes a person’s behavior to circumstances.

Finally, moving to how language shapes and reflects relationships along with communication rules. We use language to define, evaluate, and classify ourselves, others, and our experiences in the world. In addition, we use language to think hypothetically so we can consider alternative and simultaneously inhabit all three dimensions of time. As a final point, language allows us to self-reflect so that we can monitor our own behavior. To sum it all up, if Dry.

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