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Essay on human rights day Essay

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It is also a coming together, much of the way women come together ever day in every country. We come together in fields and in factories. We come together in village markets and supermarkets. We come together in living rooms and board rooms. Whether it is while playing with our children in the park, or washing clothes in a river, or taking a break at the office water cooler, we come together and talk about our aspirations and concern. And time and again, our talk turns to our children and our families.

However different we may be, there is far more that unites us than divides us.

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We share a common future, and are here to find common ground so that we may help bring new dignity and respect to women and girls all over the world. By doing this, we ring new strength and stability to families as well. By gathering in Beijing, we are focusing world attention on issues that matter most in the lives of women and their families: access to education, health care, jobs and credit, the chance to enjoy basic legal and human rights and participate fully in the political life of their countries.

There are some who question the reason for this conference.

Let them listen to the voices of women in their homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces. There are some who wonder whether the lives of women and girls matter to economic and political progress around the globe. Let them look at the women gathered here and at Hairdo – the homemakers, nurses, teachers, lawyers, policymakers, and women who run their own businesses. It is conferences like this that compel governments and people every,’here to listen, look and face the world’s most pressing problems. Wasn’t it after the women’s conference in Nairobi ten years ago that the world focused for the first time on the crisis of domestic violence?

Earlier today, I participated in a World Health Organization forum, where government officials, Nags, and individual citizens are working on ways to address the health problems of omen and girls. Tomorrow, I will attend a gathering of the Elicited Nations Development Fund for Women. There, the discussion will focus on local and highly successful programs that give hard-working women access to credit so they can improve their own lives and the lives of their families. What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish.

If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities ND nations will flourish That is why every woman, every man, every child, every family, and every nation on our planet has a stake in the discussion that takes place here. Over the past 25 years, have worked persistently on issues relating to women, children, and families. Over the past two-and-a half years, have had the opportunity to learn more about the challenges facing women in my own country and around the world. Eve met new mothers in Jakarta and Indonesia, who come together regularly in their village to discuss nutrition, family planning, and baby care. I have met working parents n Denmark who talk about the comfort they feel in knowing that their children can be cared for in creative, safe, and nurturing after-school centers. Have met women in South Africa who helped lead the struggle to end apartheid and are now helping build a new democracy. Have met with the leading women of the Western Hemisphere who are working every day to promote literacy and better health care for the children of their countries. Eve met women in India and Bangladesh who are taking out small loans to buy milk cows, rickshaws, thread and other materials to create a livelihood for themselves and their families. Eve met doctors and nurses in Belabors and Ukraine who are trying to keep children alive in the aftermath of Coherency. The great challenge of this Conference is to give voice to women every/here whose experiences go unnoticed, whose words go unheard. Women comprise more than half the word’s population. Women are 70% of the world’s poor, and two-thirds of those are not taught to read and write.

Women are the primary caretakers for most of the world’s children and elderly. Yet much of the work we do is not valued not by economists, not by historians, not by popular culture, not by government leaders. At this very moment, as we sit here, women around the world are giving birth, raising children, cooking meals, washing clothes, cleaning houses, planting crops, working on assembly lines, running companies, and running countries. Women also are dying from diseases that should have been prevented or treated. They are watching their children succumb to malnutrition caused by poverty and economic deprivation.

They are being denied the right to go to school by their own fathers and brothers. They are being forced into prostitution, and they are being barred from the band lending office and banned from the ballot box. Those of us who have the opportunity to be here have the responsibility to speak for those who could not. As an American, I want to speak up for those women in my own country-?women who are raising children on the minimum wage, women who can’t afford health care or child care, women whose lives are threatened by violence, including violence in their own homes. Ant to speak up for mothers who are fighting for good schools, safe neigh broods, clean air, and clean airwaves; for older women, some of them widows, who have raised their families and now find their skills and life experiences are not valued in the oracle; for women who are working all night as nurses, hotel clerks, and fast food cooks so that they can be at home during the day with their kids; and for women every. Veer who simply don’t have time to do everything they are called upon to do each day.

Speaking to you today, speak for them, just as each of us speaks for women around the world who are denied the chance to go to school, or see a doctor, or own property, or have a say about the direction of their lives, simply because they are women. The truth is that most women around the world work both inside and outside the home, usually by stickiest. We need to understand that there is no formula for how women should lead their lives. That is why we must respect the choices that each woman makes for herself and her family.

Every woman deserves the chance to realize her own God-given potential. We also must recognize that women will never gain full dignity until their human rights are respected and protected. Our goals for this Conference, to strengthen families and societies by empowering women to take greater control over their destinies, cannot be fully achieved unless all governments here and around the world accept heir responsibility to protect and promote internationally recognized human rights.

The international community has long acknowledged and recently affirmed at Vienna that both Women and men are entitled to a range Of protections and personal freedoms, from the right of personal security to the right to determine freely the number and spacing of the children they bear. No one should be forced to remain silent for fear of religious or political persecution, arrest, abuse or torture. Tragically, women are most often the ones whose human rights are violated. Even in the late 20th century, the rape f women continues to be used as an instrument of armed conflict.

Women and children make up a large majority of the world’s refugees. When women are excluded from the political process, they become even more vulnerable to abuse. I believe that, on the eve of a new millennium, it is time to break our silence. It is time for us to say here in Beijing, and the world to hear, that it is no longer acceptable to discuss women’s rights as separate from human rights. These abuses have continued because, for too long, the history of women has been a history of silence.

Even today, there are those who are ring to silence our words. The voices of this conference and of the women at Hairdo must be heard loud and clear: It is a violation of human rights when babies are denied food, or drowned, or suffocated, or their spines broken, simply because they are born girls. It is a violation of human rights when woman and girls are sold into the slavery of prostitution. It is a violation of human rights when women are doused with gasoline, set on fire and burned to death because their marriage dowries are deemed too small.

It IS a violation of human rights when individual women are raped in their own immunities and when thousands of women are subjected to rape as a tactic or prize of war. It is a violation of human rights when a leading cause of death worldwide along women ages 14 to 44 is the violence they are subjected to in their own homes. It is a violation of human rights when women are denied the right to plan their own families, and that includes being forced to have abortions or being sterilized against their will.

If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, it is that human rights are women’s rights – and women’s rights are human rights. Let us not forget that among those sights are the right to speak freely and the right to be heard. Women must enjoy the right to participate fully in the social and political lives of their countries if we want freedom and democracy to thrive and endure. It is indefensible that many women in nongovernmental organizations who wished to participate in this conference have not been able to attend or have been prohibited from fully taking part.

Let me be clear. Freedom means the right of people to assemble, organize and debate openly. It means respecting the views of those who may disagree with the views of their governments. It means not taking citizens away from their loved ones and jailing they, mistreating them, or denying them their freedom or dignity because of the peaceful expression of their ideas and opinions. In my country, we recently celebrated the 75th anniversary of women’s suffrage. It took 1 50 years after the signing of our Declaration of Independence for women to win the right to Vote.

It took 72 years Of organized struggle on the part of many courageous women and men. It was one of America’s most divisive philosophical wars. But it was also a bloodless war. Suffrage was achieved without a shot being fired. We have also been reminded, in V-J Day observances last weekend, of the good that comes when men and women join together to combat the forces of tyranny and build a better world. We have seen peace prevail in most places for a half century. We have avoided another world war.

But we have not solved older, deeply-rooted problems that continue to diminish the potential of half the world’s population. Now it is time to act on behalf of women everywhere. If we take bold steps to better the lives of women, we will be taking bold steps to better the lives of children and families too. Families rely on mothers and ivies for emotional support and care; families rely on women for labor in the home; and increasingly, families rely on women for income needed to raise healthy children and care for other relatives.

As long as discrimination and inequities remain so commonplace around the world as long as girls and women are valued less, red less, fed last, overworked, underpaid, not schooled and subjected to violence in and out of their homes the potential of the human family to create a peaceful, prosperous world will not be realized. Let this Conference be our and the world’s call to action. And let s heed the call so that we can create a world in which every woman is treated with respect and dignity, every boy and girl is loved and cared for equally, and every family has the hope of a strong and stable future.

Thank you very much. May God bless you, your work and all who will benefit from it. 1 : Wasn’t it after the women’s conference in Nairobi ten years ago that the world focused for the first time on the crisis of domestic violence? Rhetorical Question: (1) Engages audience in her issue/topic (2) Shows the importance of the conference in educating the rest of the world on these mostly ignored issues. : What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish.

If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations will flourish. Hasty Generalization: (1) Silicon’s conclusion is drawn on insufficient evidence. (2) Although she claims that families will flourish, her argument is shaky because she does not provide evidence of this outcome happening in history or any suggestion s to why families will flourish. : Over the past two-and-a half years, I have had the opportunity to learn more about the challenges facing women in my own country and around the world. Have met new mothers in Jakarta and Indonesia, who come together regularly in their village to discuss nutrition, family planning and baby care. I have met working parents in Denmark who talk about the comfort they feel in knowing that their children can be cared for in creative, safe, and nurturing after-school centers. I have met women in South Africa who helped lead the struggle to end apartheid and are now helping build a new democracy.

I have met with the leading women of the Western Hemisphere who are working every day to promote literacy and better health care for the children of their countries. Have met women in India and Bangladesh who are taking out small loans to buy milk cows, rickshaws, thread and other materials to create a livelihood for themselves and their families. Have met doctors and nurses in Belabors and Ukraine who are trying to keep children alive in the aftermath of Coherency. Narration: (1) Shows the reader that she has personally met women around the world who are struggling and fighting. 2) Has personally encouraged circumstances hat she talks about in her speech; makes argument more credible and believable. 4: They are watching their children succumb to malnutrition caused by banned from the ballot box. Anaphora: (1) Anaphora of the phrase “they are” (2) Repetition of “they” emphasizes its plural form _not only many, but millions of women being discriminated. (3) Repetition of “are” emphasizes its present tense _the discrimination is occurring right now. 5: they are being barred from the band lending office and banned from the ballot box.

Alliteration: (1) Alliteration of the letter “b” illustrates bias and brutality of the world against women. 2) Delivers emotions of injustices and unfairness to reader. (3) General Idea: In society, women are treated unequally because men are considered superior. 6: If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, it is that human rights are women’s rights _ and women’s rights are human rights. ” Schism’s: (1 ) Clinton draws connections between different examples/ideas. (2) Stresses Particular points (e. G. Human rights) to make an impact on her audience. : Let me be clear. Freedom means the right of people to assemble, organize and debate openly. It means respecting the views of those who may disagree tit the views of their governments. It means not taking citizens away from their loved ones and jailing they, mistreating them, or denying them their freedom or dignity because of the peaceful expression of their ideas and opinions. Definition: (1 ) Clarifies true and original meaning of freedom. (2) Suggests to reader she believes the world has forgotten authentic (3) Reminds reader that the world must Stay focused on what meaning. He term truly represents. : (2) Women’s Rights Are Human Rights Speech Analysis Philosophy Essay On 5 September 1995, Hillary Clinton, former first Lady of the United States, was invited by the Women & Health Security Colloquium, which was sponsored by the World Health Organization, to attend the Fourth U. N. World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. As the Honorary Chairperson of the united States delegation to the conference, she gave the speech, “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights” in the first few days during a special Plenary Session.

In the speech, she utilized several persuasive techniques, also known as propaganda, grasping people’s attention in order to achieve support for the claim of the women’s rights she was devoted to. Propaganda is usually a peach device that people intently use to induce or intensify others’ actions and attitudes with some deluded languages. Since propaganda is deliberate, it is often looked down as an evil and offensive tool. However, sometimes it can just be used for an act of persuasion or a personal perspective.

According to Cross, propaganda is an important tool and seen in everywhere surrounding our lives. It needs to be correctly analyzed and respected and it can actually work toward good causes as well as bad (p. 526). -For example, by intentionally incorporating propaganda into her speech, such as appealing to people’s emotions, distracting people’s attention, and somewhat misleading people, Hillary Clinton strengthened her persuasive power for women’s rights and successfully beamed her message all over the world.

Some propaganda techniques employ pathos, the act of appealing to people’s emotions. For example, plain-folks appeal, a device where a speaker tries to win our confidence and support by appearing to be a person like ourselves, is a type of propaganda. Silicon’s speech displays this technique when she says, ‘We come together in fields and in factories. In village markets and supermarkets. In living rooms and board rooms. Her words suggest that she is one of those everyday people in fields, factories, markets, living rooms, and board rooms.

Clinton further expands this idea by saying, “We share a common future. ” This statement suggests that because we share the same future, we are on the same level. She is telling her audience that we should listen to her points because she is one Of us, and thus has similar goals and interests to us. We are effectively led to believe that we should trust her so that we can overcome our shared struggles to achieve those shared goals and that shared future. Through plain-folks appeal, she turns her audience into rusting comrades-in-arms.

She then employs the bandwagon technique in a similar manner. When she says, “That is why every woman, every man, every child, every family, and every nation on our planet has a stake in the discussion that takes place here,” she is again promoting that idea of oneness, which is the sharing of both struggles and goals. In the bandwagon technique, however, the goal is to pressure people to believe what everyone else believes and to conform, thus being faithful to the conference.

There is a call to action. Clinton is telling the audience to “jump on the bandwagon,” because if one of them does not, hat is the equivalent of turning away from your fellows. In the speech, she further strengthens the credibility of her argument by appealing to other emotions, such as pity and fear. Appealing to pity is achieved by attempting to win the audience’s sympathy by giving examples of rightfully pitiable situations, in order to convince us of the conclusion or solution she will propose.

One sees this technique in the statement: “As an American, I want to speak up for women in my own country – women who are raising children on the minimum wage, women who can’t afford health care or child care, omen whose lives are threatened by violence, including violence in their own homes. ” In that sentence, she in effect not only manages to tug on the audience’s heartstrings, but also to subtly declare herself as the honorary representative of these poor souls; then she becomes the voice of the voiceless and oppressed.

At the same time, it is also hard not to notice how Clinton makes the use of “appeal to fear,” a persuasion technique that implicitly threatens the audience and like the previous examples of pathos-based argument, uses emotions rather than reasons to persuade. Clinton displays this technique in ere speech by saying, “As long as discrimination and inequities remain So commonplace around the world – as long as girls and women are valued less, fed less, fed last, ovenbird, underpaid, not schooled and subjected to violence in and out of their homes – the potential of the human family to create a peaceful, prosperous world will not be realized. Here, she is basically saying that people feel pity for those disenfranchised individuals she gives as an example, but if we continue to do nothing, their situations will deteriorate further and worst of all, such situations may affect them as well, in their own family and in their own home. Of course, the point of stirring her audience to such extents is to pursue a specific ideal, sometimes even a certain agenda. In the speech, however, she does not specify what exact action she wants her audience to take, and yet the call to action is almost palpable.

Clinton achieves this by distracting her audience’s attention. In particular, she uses transfer-glory by association in this case-a propaganda technique wherein the speaker attempts to transfer our good feelings about one thing, towards their viewpoints. She makes her audience aware that her goal is the improvement of women’s lives, “What we n society, their families will flourish. ” However, as we can see, she is careful not to exclude anyone from appreciating her viewpoints. In fact, she suggests that by joining her cause, people would actually be helping themselves.

Clinton even broadens the scope of these purported benefits when she says, “And when families flourish, communities and nations will flourish. ” Thus, by helping women, we are actually helping the entire world. It is an altruistic enough message in all respects. To cement such a message, however, we will notice that the speech is also littered with attempts to mislead the audience as well. For example, when she states, “Women are the primary caretakers for most of the world’s children and elderly,” she is making a hasty generalization in fact.

As Cooper shown, “A hasty generalization is a conclusion based on a sample that is too small or in some other way unrepresentative of the larger population. ” (p. 152) Such a statement supports her overall argument and it might also be true in certain cases; however, she misleads her audience by stating it as a fact without stating a basis that men can also be the primary caretakers for children and seniors. Silicon’s use of another technique in her speech, stroking (Argument ad peplum), gains my admiration.

First, she presents an opposing view to her points when she states, “There are some who wonder whether the lives of Women and girls matter to economic and political progress around the globe. ” By suggesting that some people think it is not necessary to care about women’s rights simply just because they think women are less useful in the field of economy and politics, she raises indignation. However, it is misleading in that it creates an opponent, an unspecified “they,” that may or may not exist. Thus, the argument becomes whether what “they” said is true or not, ND not the possibility that no one truly said those instigating statements.

Clinton then assures the indignant audience that there are many women who are just as successful as men in professions with high emolument in fact, stating: “Let them look at the women gathered here and at Hairdo – the homemakers, nurses, teachers, lava. N. Years, policymakers, and women who run their own businesses. ” She manages to present both argument and counterargument without specifying who the enemy is supposed to be and uses stroking that makes us feel we as women are very important to the society. Another technique that Clinton uses to mislead her audience to cement her message is card-stacking.

Card-stacking is the technique which tells us the fact that is true but still not the entirely true in order to prevent us from being aware of some other important facts. For example, Clinton employs this technique when she states, “If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women ‘s rights – and women’s rights are human rights, once and for all. ” While it is true that women’s rights are a part of human rights, human rights are not specific to just “all women,” hey encompass the rights Of both genders.

Here, Clinton uses the card- stacking to mislead us, in order to perk up the importance of women’s rights. Near the end, she uses card-stacking again when she says, “Families rely on mothers and wives for emotional support and care; families rely on women for labor in the home; and increasingly, families rely on women for income needed to raise healthy children and care for other relatives. ” Considering the very diverse memberships, values, and situations of any set of real families, this generalization is not necessarily true; thus, she subtly misleads her audience again.

Throughout the history, propaganda is often used by government or politics or advertiser to affect people’s attitude and consequently alter people’s decisions to become the follower of the point of the political party or become the consumer of the company involuntarily. However, the intention of Silicon’s speech is completely different. It does not have to damage an opposition ;s credit as in some candidates’ speech, and neither induces people to purchase something actually unnecessary in their lives as in some ads. It is about delivering a great message for her audience regarding the significance f public women welfare.

Cite this Essay on human rights day Essay

Essay on human rights day Essay. (2018, Feb 07). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/essay-womens-rights-are-human-rights-how-to/

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