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Designing Operations to Meet Demand National Cranberry Cooperative

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DESIGNING OPERATIONS TO MEET DEMAND NATIONAL CRANBERRY COOPERATIVE CASE ANALYSIS 25th May 2010 Submission by: Group-B Dhananjay Kumar Kshitij Kulkarni Pankaj Shrivastava Rajesh Premchandran Salil Choudhary Siddharth Sinha Tanushree Datta 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY * Hugo Schaeffer, VP, Operations faces 3 problems during the harvest season at the National Cranberry Cooperative (NCC). a. Drivers and trucks spend up to 3 hours unloading cranberries when it takes around 5-10 minutes to actually unload if the holding containers are available b. Overtime costs have increased considerably as NCC struggles with absenteeism c.

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There are problems associated with Grading Inputs as NCC overpaid around 50% of the time for inferior quality cranberries * * 2. ANALYSIS * The current operations of NCC are analyzed based on Time, Cost, Quality and Flexibility as performance parameters. 1. Time * The continuous process operation for Process Fruit consists of various stages. There are two parallel streams: wet and dry processing. Figure 1 shows how the two parallel streams merge at the Quality Grading Process Area. * * This table shows the per hour capacity for each operation for Wet Process Dumping| Holding| Dechaff| Dry| Quality| 100| 3200*| 3000| 600| 840**| TABLE 1 * * This table shows the per hour capacity for each operation for Dry Process Dumping| Holding| Destone| Dechaff| Quality| 900| 4000*| 4500| 1500| 360**| TABLE 2 *Option of using part of 2000/hr from bins used for both dry and wet added to wet since capacity of dry is enough to sustain 900 bbl/hr. ** Capacity for wet and dry at 70:30, =. 7*1200=840,360 * The rate at which cranberries are unloaded is greater than the rate at which the Temporary Holding bins are unloaded into the Dechaffing and Destoning process for wet and dry process respectively.

Further, Drying for the wet process can only handle 600 bbl/hr. This would cause congestion at the Dechaff level which in turn causes delays in emptying holding bins for the wet process. * The same argument would hold for the dry process. “Separating” is the bottleneck for the Drying Process. * 2. Costs * The Cost related to quality grading is covered in the next item. The Overtime costs incurred is about 87% of direct hours during peak season. See Figure 2. This reflects on the actual labour that is needed to process the volumes of cranberry produced.

However, since only 1 shift is run, this area needs significant attention. * 3. Quality * The problem of Quality Grading results in overpayment to the farmers. At . 75c a bbl, 225000 bbls amount to $168750 in excess payments. The costs involved in tackling this problem is $20000 for light meter and another Salary paid to a new employee. This being a cooperative, any profit or loss is borne by the farmers. So the more equitable distribution of wealth happening currently is favourable to those farmers who produce inferior goods, but get compensated more. * If the Quality of customer experience is considered both the average truck wait times and the cost of the waiting period impact the farmers’ profits. * 4. Flexibility * Flexibility in cranberry processing can be based on several factors. a. The percentage of berries that are water harvested determines the number of bins to allocate to wet berries. This also determines the dryer capacity, as it is the bottleneck for wet berries. That in turn affects the milling allocation and subsequent treatment at finish processing plants. b. The total production is seen as increasing each year.

In order not to affect market prices 10% is set aside. Yet, RP1 struggles to process the 90% remaining berries on time. c. The ‘daily delivery’ also affects the manpower scheduling and truck arrival rates. From ‘Figure A’ in the case, we see that for 1979, the range of daily deliveries range from 9000 to 24000 bbls a day during peak season. d. Within a season September has more dry harvests (60%) compared to October (40%). This is expected to change in 1981 with more wet harvests predicted. * Before ‘Separation/Milling’ the processes for wet and dry berries are different and rigid. * * * 3. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1. Farmer Satisfaction i. Growers send their cranberries to the Receiving Plant in trucks. The costs of waiting affect them negatively. ii. A good price at berry drop off is critical to the satisfaction of growers. The current method of compensating potentially undeserving growers at the expense of those producing high quality berries may cause resentment in the latter group. * 2. Speed of processing * Since 70% of the crop is water harvested, the cranberries must be processed the same day. By ‘processed’ we mean it should leave the ‘finish processing plant’ to allow for the next day’s truck load to be processed. Water harvested berries are not sold fresh. Hence almost 70% of the fruit must be frozen either in bags or in bulk. Assuming 20000 bbls/day, wet berries arrive at . 75*20000/12= 1250 bbls/hr. The processing of wet berries is at 600 bbls. So at the end of the 12 hour period, 7200 are processed (or in-process) while bins can store 3200. That leaves 15000-7200-3200=4600 bbls in trucks! * 3. Labour * The fresh fruit processing requires 400 workers. This when coupled with labour in the processed fruit department, puts a heavy strain on resources, especially since overtime costs are a drain on finances. 4. ALTERNATIVES * 1. Light meter * Currently the process of determining good colour of cranberry is based on manual inspection and has 50% failure resulting in plant loss of $168750. Addition of light meter ($20000) and a permanent worker will add to overhead cost of the plant. This one time investment can help implement a fair revenue sharing across the members * 2. Start shift at 7 am * One of the main reasons for storage comes from the fact that the processing plant starts at 11 a. m. In the absence of a valid reason for the same, the “processing” shift can start at 7 a. m.

This removes all the back up at 1500 bbl/hr. But for peak load of 2000 bbl/ hr, still has backup as shown in Figure 3. * 3. Buy 1 dryer and start shift at 7 am * Addition of 1 dryer will help minimize the effects of bottleneck at the “drying” stage and increase total drying capacity to 800 bbl/hour. As shown in Figure 4 this improves plant throughput and reduces total back up by 1 hour. This option will cost $40000 * 4. Buy 2 dryers and Start Shift at 7 am * Addition of 1 more dryer will help minimize the effects of bottleneck at the “drying” stage further and increase total drying capacity to 1000 bbl/hour.

As shown in Figure 5 this improves plant throughput and removes back up. This option will cost $80000 * 5. Buy 2 dryer and 1 Separator and Start Shift at 7 a. m * Although option “d” removed the back up, still lot of workers need to work overtime and so the cost of $80000 is hard to justify. If 1 extra separator is added to the system, another bottleneck at “separation” stage is removed and there will not be any overtime. Please see Figure 7. The cost saved in overtime will justify the purchase of 2 dryers and 1 separator. Within one year plan will make up for the cost. * 6.

Implement truck scheduling * Similar to a “Just in Time” process, a detailed delivery schedule can be planned with the growers. This will minimize the uncertainty in the delivery schedule. * 7. Alternate design of the process * The current process has few processes separate for wet and dry berries. As shown in Figure 8, the drying can be moved before dechaffing and the two flows would meet upstream in the process. This will remove the constraint of dedicated 1500 bbl/hr for dry cranberries and entire 4500 bbl/hr capacity of “dechaffing” unit can be used any type of cranberry.

Considering current process needs, this is not a critical requirement. * 5. CHALLENGES AND PITFALLS * 1. Labour * The fresh fruit processing requires 400 workers. This when coupled with labour in the processed fruit department, puts a heavy strain on resources, especially since overtime costs are a drain on finances. Increasing a shift, might cause less absenteeism, but the second shift might not have a full 8 hours of work. This means that 2nd shift workers might be paid without work for the full 8 hours. 2. Wet vs. Dry Increasing wet processing capacity by removing bottlenecks at drying for example will cause more wet berries to flow through the system. However, since Separation is a common process, the extra wet berries will cause less dry berries to be processed. * 3. Truck Arrival Times * The arrival of trucks with loads isn’t at a uniform pace, quantity and product type. There could be 10 trucks arriving with dry berries in the 1st hour and then 15 with wet berries in the next. It is imperative that the Receiving plant coordinate the nature of truck arrivals in order for the current ‘inflexible’ system to work. 4. Costs * Any additional investment in dryers/separators/bins would need to be justified by a corresponding decrease in costs associated with Truck wait times. Assuming that each Truck along with its driver costs $10/hr, a wait time of 3 hours corresponds to $30. For an investment of $40,000 for an additional dryer, cost savings of $40,000/30 or 1333 hours of truck wait times over the life of the dryer must be realized. * * 6. RECOMMENDATION * d. Since Drying is the bottleneck for the wet berries, we can consider investing in a extra drying unit. This will increase drying capacity to 800 bbl/day.

This leaves 1200-800 =400 for dry berries in the separator. This is also in keeping with the higher proportion of wet that dry berries received year on year. A second dryer may be bought if the cost of a separator is not prohibitive. * e. According to Figure A in the case, under peak load the # bbls a day can reach 24000. This translates to 1500 per hour (7 am to 11 p. m). The first workers arrive at 11 a. m. So 6000 bbls are already present before workers start arriving. 70% of 6000 is 4200 wet berries and 1800 dry berries. Wet berry holding bins only have 3200 (+2000), assuming all common bins are taken).

So the trucks will have to wait till 1000 wet berries are processed. At 600 bbl/hr (drying) it will take almost 2 hours to unload the truck at 11 am. In other words, workers must start earlier and start processing berries as soon as they arrive, instead of at 11 a. m. * Advancing workings hours will have a lowering effect on overtime. Since we are reasonably sure of starting the day at 7 am when trucks start arriving, we can start the 1st shift of 8 hours from 7 to 3 p. m. During peak season we can have a 2nd shift from 3 to 11 p. m. This will reduce absenteeism as people would work less and would be less stressed. * * f. Converting bins will increase the wet holding capacity by 250 bbl/hr for each bin added. As per (b) above, that will reduce the truck waiting time, but since a truck lease cost per hour + driver cost per hour, is more than adding a worker per hour (4/hr seasonal), it is more economical to advance the working hours than to convert bins. The common bins can be entirely used for wet in any case. Moreover, since wet berries already come in trucks, storing them temporarily in extra dry bins may not damage them any further. So, there is no need to spend $7500 on bin conversions. * * g.

The berry grading process must change. The process of grading the entire truck with a uniform grade is not correct. A sample is already being taken and tested for quantity of good berries. This sample should also be tested for proportion of 1,2A, 2B and 3 grade berries. The other option is to change the grading scale, and have 3 as better than 2B, but 4 as the best grade. * h. Throttling the arrival of trucks by planning in advance might reduce the erratic variability of the berry dumping rates. This is possible since growers can predict at least a few days in advance, the type of harvesting nd the quantity of berries that they might bring. * i. The entire production process should be allocating dryers and separator machine cycles based on proportion of web and dry berries. Further, if either wet or dry berries have for that day have all been processed, excess dryer/separator capacity should be diverted to the remaining type. Alternate design shown in Figure 8 may help in making the process more flexible. Figure 1 Process Flow Diagram (Current), Circles show bottlenecks | Receiving| DDD| Milling| Shipping| Control| Total| Normal Hours|  |  |  |  |  |  | Full time| 6| 1| 10| 8| 2| 27|

Seasonal| 9| 0| 5| 12| 0| 32. 5| Regular FT Wage| 6. 5| 6. 5| 6. 5| 6. 5| 6. 5|  | Seasonal FT Wage| 4| 4| 4| 4| 4|  | Total Regular| 2444| Per day|  |  |  |  | |  |  |  |  |  |  | OT|  |  |  |  |  |  | Full time| 6| 1| 10| 8| 0| 25| Seasonal| 9| 0| 5| 12| 0| 48. 75| Regular OT Wage| 9. 75| 9. 75| 9. 75| 9. 75| 9. 75|  | Seasonal OT Wage| 6| 6| 6| 6| 6|  | Total Regular| 2145| per day|  |  |  |  | Figure 2 Overtime costs during peak Season (Current) Incoming Bbl| 18000| | Process| The maximum that can be processed per hour| Bbl/hr| | 1500| | Stored| The maximum that can be stored in bins per hour| wet/dry| | 0. | | Backup| The maximum that can be stored in trucks per hour| wet bbl| | 1050| | Delivery| The maximum delivery rate per hour| dry bbl| | 450| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Delivery| Process| Stored| Backup| Total| Time| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Backup| 7-8| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 450| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 900| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 1350| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 1800| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 2250| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 2700| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 3150| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 450| 1050| 450| 600| 0| 3200| 0| 400| 400| -4| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 3000| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 2400| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 1800| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 1200| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 600| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| -10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| Figure 3: Move workers upto 7 a. m, Input at 1500 bbl/hr Incoming Bbl| 24000| | Process| The maximum that can be processed per hour| Bbl/hr| | 2000| | Stored| The maximum that can be stored in bins per hour| wet/dry| | 0. 7| | Backup| The maximum that can be stored in trucks per hour| wet bbl| | 1400| | Delivery| The maximum delivery rate per hour| dry bbl| | 600| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Delivery| Process| Stored| Backup| Total| Time| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Backup| 7-8| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 150| 800| 0| 0| 0| -9| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 300| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 450| 2400| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 600| 3200| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 750| 3200| 0| 800| 800| 12-1| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 900| 3200| 0| 1600| 1600| 1-2| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 1050| 3200| 0| 2400| 2400| 2-3| 600| 1400| 450| 600| 1200| 3200| 0| 3200| 3200| 3-4| 0| 0| 450| 600| 750 | 3200| 0| 2600| 2600| 4-5| 0| 0| 450| 600| 300 | 3200| 0| 2000| 2000| 5-6| 0| 0| 300| 600| 0 | 3200| 0| 1400| 1400| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 3200| 0| 800| 800| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 3200| 0| 200| 200| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 2800| 0| 0| 0| -10| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 2200| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 1600| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 1000| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 0| 0| 0| 600| 0 | 400| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 0| 0| 0| 400| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| Figure 4: Move workers upto 7 a. m, Input at 2000 bbl/hr Incoming Bbl| 24000| | | | | | | | per hour| | 2000| | | | | | | | wet/dry| | 0. | | | | | | | | wet bbl| | 1400| | | | | | | | dry bbl| | 600| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Delivery| Process| Stored| Backup| Total| Time| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Backup| 7-8| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 200| 600| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 400| 1200| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 600| 1800| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 800| 2400| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 1000| 3000| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 1200| 3200| 0| 400| 400| 1-2| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 1400| 3200| 0| 1000| 1000| 2-3| 600| 1400| 400| 800| 1600| 3200| 0| 1600| 1600| 3-4| 0| 0| 400| 800| 1200 | 3200| 0| 800| 800| -5| 0| 0| 400| 800| 800 | 3200| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 400| 800| 400 | 2400| 0|  | 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 400| 800| 0 | 1600| 0|  | 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 400| 800| 0 | 800| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 800| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| -9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0 | 0| 0| 0| 0| Figure 5: Move workers upto 7 a. m, Input at 2000 bbl/hr, extra dryer Incoming Bbl| 24000| | | | | | | | per hour| | 2000| | | | | | | | wet/dry| | 0. 7| | | | | | | | wet bbl| | 1400| | | | | | | | dry bbl| | 600| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Delivery| Process| Stored| Backup| Total| Time| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Backup| 7-8| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 400| 400| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 800| 800| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 1200| 1200| 0| 0| 0| 0-11| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 1600| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 2000| 2000| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 2400| 2400| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 2800| 2800| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 600| 1400| 200| 1000| 3200| 3200| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 200| 1000| 3000| 2200| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 200| 1000| 2800| 1200| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 200| 1000| 2600| 200| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 1000| 200| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 1200| 0| 400| 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 400| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| -2| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| Figure 6: Move workers upto 7 a. m, Input at 2000 bbl/hr, 2 extra dryers Incoming Bbl| 24000| | | | | | | | per hour| | 2000| | | | | | | | wet/dry| | 0. 7| | | | | | | | wet bbl| | 1400| | | | | | | | dry bbl| | 600| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Delivery| Process| Stored| Backup| Total|

Time| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Dry| Wet| Backup| 7-8| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 400| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 800| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 1200| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 2000| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 2400| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 2800| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 600| 1400| 600| 1000| 0| 3200| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 1600| 0| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 1600| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| -10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 11-12| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 12-1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1-2| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 2-3| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 3-4| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 4-5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 5-6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 6-7| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 7-8| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 8-9| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 9-10| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 10-11| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| Figure 7: Move workers upto 7 a. m, Input at 2000 bbl/hr, 2 extra dryers, 1 extra separator Figure 8: Move drying before Dechaffing for Wet, Common Dechaffing for all

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Designing Operations to Meet Demand National Cranberry Cooperative. (2018, Mar 25). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/national-cranberry-cooperative-essay/

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