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Marie Stopes’ Criticisms

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Stopes’ reading on the subject prompted her first book ‘Married Love’, which was published in 1918. The book was condemned by churches, the medical establishment and the press but was very popular, selling 2,000 copies within a fortnight. Thousands of women wrote to ask her advice. Marie Stopes became famous overnight, and used the publicity to advance her cause. Stope’s first book Married Love published in 1918 was condemned by churches, the medical establishment and the press. However, the book was so popular it was sold 2,000 copies in two weeks.

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Stopes became popular and famous having thousands of women asking her for advice. Stopes used her publicity and fame to back up for her causes. On its release, Married Love gave Stopes overnight fame. More than 2000 copies were sold in a fortnight and it was the first sex manual published in the UK. Many letters are available in archival collections that were written by women thanking Stopes for her work and asking for information on birth control.

The book was labeled “immoral” and “obscene” by the church, the media and the medical community.

In two weeks time, Married Love sold 2,000 copies and it was the first sexual manuscript or book ever published in the UK. Numerous women wrote letters to Stopes thanking her for her work and asking for advice on the information of birth control even if the book was condemned by the church, the media, and the medical community as immoral and obscene. Marie Stopes established her clinic in 1921. The purpose was, however, seen as a prevention of births of so many of the racially inferior working class, of those she described as “the inferior, the depraved, and the feeble-minded”.

That’s why her clinics were founded in poor areas. Her slogan was: “Joyful and Deliberate Motherhood, A Safe Light in our Racial Darkness. ” She believed, as she wrote in her book Radiant Motherhood (1920), that “the sterilisation of those totally unfit for parenthood [should be] made an immediate possibility, indeed made compulsory. ” She contributed a chapter to The Control of Parenthood (1920), which was a sort of manifesto for her circle of eugenicists, arguing for a “utopia” to be achieved through “racial purification”.

Stopes’s clinic in 1921 was conveyed as a prevention of births of many inferior working classes as she had described in her book as “the inferior, the depraved, and the feeble-minded”. It is why her clinics can be found in poor areas. Her slogan was: “Joyful and Deliberate Motherhood, A Safe Light in our Racial Darkness. ” She believed, as she wrote in her book Radiant Motherhood (1920), that “the sterilisation of those totally unfit for parenthood [should be] made an immediate possibility, indeed made compulsory. She contributed a chapter to The Control of Parenthood (1920), which was a sort of manifesto for her circle of eugenicists, arguing for a “utopia” to be achieved through “racial purification”. In 1922 a book was published called Birth Control by a Roman Catholic doctor, Halliday Gibson Sutherland. The book attacked Stopes over her advocacy of the cervical cap, describing the cap as “the most harmful method [of contraception] of which I have had experience” associating her birth control campaign with a writer convicted of obscenity for publishing on birth control 45 years earlier.

Sutherland did not respond to a challenge to debate the issue, so a writ for libel was issued against him. In 1922, a Roman Catholic doctor Halliday Gibson Sutherland published a book called Birth Control which attacked Stopes on her support for the cervical cap as he had said that it was “the most harmful method [of contraception] of which I have had experience”. Marie Stopes was later convicted for obscenity in her work 45 years earlier on the topic of contraception. Sutherland accused Stopes of using poor women as experiments. Stopes strongly denied the charges and sued Sutherland for it.

However, Sutherland later was cleared of charges but this also brought Stopes public attention at large amount then she became public speaker. In 1924, Stopes lost many assets of hers in favor of Sutherland as the court had decided. But this loss created many popularity for her cause which is birth control topic and the clients at her clinic increased. In 1931, her book sold 750,000 copies through 19 editions. In 1933, she published a book debating to the Church’s attack on her work and even though, the churches condemned the book but later see the necessity in birth control by 1958. 1924. The decision, irrevocable, was in Sutherland’s favor.

The cost for Stopes was vast. However, the publicity and book sales partially compensated her losses. The trial had made birth control a public topic and the numbers of clients visiting the clinic doubled. A Roman Catholic doctor, Halliday Sutherland, wrote a treatise accusing Stopes of using poor women for birth control experiments; she vehemently denied the charges and countered by suing Sutherland for libel. The highly publicized trials that followed ultimately resulted in Sutherland being cleared of the charges, but brought Stopes an incredible amount of attention, resulting in her popularity as a public speaker.

She also published a formal rebuttal to the Church’s attacks on her work in the 1933 book, Roman Catholic Methods of Birth Control. Although Catholic and Anglican churches and British doctors scorned her book – only in the year of her death, 1958, did an Anglican bishops conference concede the necessity for birth control – the average person in Britain loved it as it went through 19 editions and sales of almost 750,000 copies by 1931. The U. S. Customs Service banned the book as being obscene until Judge John M.

Woolsey declared it welcome on 6 April 1931 (Woolsey would later allow James Joyce’s Ulysses into the United States). Here’s part of what Woolsey wrote: “[Married Love] makes also some apparently justified criticisms of the inopportune exercise, by the man in the marriage relation, of what are often referred to as his conjugal or marital rights, and it pleads with seriousness, and not without some eloquence, for a better understanding by husbands of the physical and emotional side of the sex life of their wives. ” The book was banned by U. S. Customs Service but it was welcomed by Judge John M. Wooley on April 6th. 1931.

His statement was “[Married Love] makes also some apparently justified criticisms of the inopportune exercise, by the man in the marriage relation, of what are often referred to as his conjugal or marital rights, and it pleads with seriousness, and not without some eloquence, for a better understanding by husbands of the physical and emotional side of the sex life of their wives. ” The Publishers’ Foreword states, in part: “It [the suppression of sex-education books] demonstrates once more, and with shocking conclusiveness, that the government agencies vested with the power of initiating suppression are grossly unfit for the task.

It emphasizes once more the truth that changing times mean changing morals; that the pernicious methods of secrecy and prudishness which characterized the treatment of sex for generations are things of the past; that with our modern attitude of encouraging and satisfying wholesome curiosity, of meeting our problems squarely and openly, we have come to regard sex not as something vile and unmentionable, not as something to be thrust into the background and to be smirkingly whispered about, but as a uman function of momentous importance both to the individual and to society. ” The Publishers’ Foreword states, in part: “It [the suppression of sex-education books] demonstrates once more, and with shocking conclusiveness, that the government agencies vested with the power of initiating suppression are grossly unfit for the task.

It emphasizes once more the truth that changing times mean changing morals; that the pernicious methods of secrecy and prudishness which characterized the treatment of sex for generations are things of the past; that with our modern attitude of encouraging and satisfying wholesome curiosity, of meeting our problems squarely and openly, we have come to regard sex not as something vile and unmentionable, not as something to be thrust into the background and to be smirkingly whispered about, but as a human function of momentous importance both to the individual and to society. In 1935, US academics named Married Love number 16 in a list of the 25 most influential books of the past 50 years. In 1935, US academics named Married Love number 16 in a list of the 25 most influential books of the past 50 years. Also in the same year, Stopes attended the Nazi congress on population science in Berlin calling for “compulsory sterilisation of the diseased, drunkards, or simply those of bad character. ” She acted so on her concentration on abortion clinics in poor areas to reduce birth rate of the lower classes.

This evoked Anthony Ozimic’s comment on her by saying that praising her is like praising Adolf Hitler as a great leader because both of them promoted the eugenics to create a super race while Ozimic think it’s the act of crime upon the vulnerable members of society just to create racial progress. Even though, the method of birth control was condemned by many, her method relieve many women from having traumatic giving birth to a child with a cleft palate. Eugenic abortion accounts for an increasing proportion of the 7 million “terminations” in Britain since 1967.

The feminist also attended the Nazi congress on population science in Berlin in 1935, while calling for the “compulsory sterilisation of the diseased, drunkards, or simply those of bad character. ” Stopes acted on her appalling theories by concentrating her abortion clinics in poor areas so as to reduce the birth rate of the lower classes. Anthony Ozimic of the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children said: “Praising Marie Stopes as a woman of distinction should be as unacceptable as praising Adolf Hitler as a great leader. “Both promoted compulsory sterilisation and thereby the eventual elimination of society’s most vulnerable members to achieve what they called racial progress. ” However, even racist peccadilloes can be ignored to honour a pioneer who helped promote the anti-life culture and relieve women of the intolerable trauma of giving birth to a child with a cleft palate. Eugenic abortion accounts for an increasing proportion of the 7 million “terminations” in Britain since 1967.

Recently in 2008, Stopes was on the commemorative stamps for being one of the leading British women of the 20th century and this create heavy criticisms towards Britain’s Royal Mail. Peter Mullen or a rector of St. Michael’s in the City of London commented Stopes to be a Nazi sympathizer and added “She campaigned to have the poor, the sick and people of mixed race sterilized. The managers of the Royal Mail deserve to be condemned for their honoring Marie Stopes. ” In 2008, Britain’s Royal Mail was bitterly criticized by many quarters for honoring Stopes with a commemorative stamp as one of the leading British women of the 20th century.

A prominent British cleric named Peter Mullen, rector of St. Michael’s in the City of London, condemned Stopes as a Nazi sympathizer and added: “She campaigned to have the poor, the sick and people of mixed race sterilized. The managers of the Royal Mail deserve to be condemned for their honoring Marie Stopes. ” Other than the negative aspects, Marie Stopes was praised by many women for her work. She received hundreds of letters from women about birth control. Marie Stopes used her status in the society from imposing family planning to working classes continually to back up her cause to reduce the poverty and ill health.

On Sunday October 20, the BBC announced its viewers’ ‘Greatest Britons’. However, Married Love also provided some positive aspects, Marie Stopes received hundreds of letters from women about birth control. Appalled at the burden of poverty and ill health that ignorance of family planning methods imposed on the working classes, Marie used her celebrity status to take up the cause. On Sunday October 20, the BBC announced its viewers’ ‘Greatest Britons’. However, the recent open of Marie Stopes International in Belfast, Northern Ireland has upset many people of many divisions. Bishop of

Down and Connor Noel Treanor said: “The opening of this facility further undermines the sanctity and dignity of human life in our society where the most vulnerable and defenceless human beings are already under threat. “The termination of human life following conception denies the humanity and inherent dignity of the child in the womb and violates the right to life. ” A DUP spokesman said: “The DUP does not support any change to the current abortion laws in Northern Ireland. Support for this stance is not simply confined to the DUP but is one shared by all of the main political parties. A Sinn Fein spokesman said: “Sinn Fein is not in favour of abortion nor do we believe that the 1967 British Abortion Act should be extended to the six counties. “Sinn Fein believes were a woman’s life or mental health is at risk or in grave danger that the final decision rests with the woman. “The Marie Stopes clinic is a private institution. It has to operate under the guidelines and legal framework set out by the Department of Health in North. ” A UUP spokesman said: “The Ulster Unionist Party believes that the matter of abortion is one of personal conscience and therefore members are free to express their own opinion on this matter. “

Cite this Marie Stopes’ Criticisms

Marie Stopes’ Criticisms. (2016, Oct 14). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/marie-stopes-criticisms/

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