We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

See Pricing

What's Your Topic?

Hire a Professional Writer Now

The input space is limited by 250 symbols

What's Your Deadline?

Choose 3 Hours or More.
Back
2/4 steps

How Many Pages?

Back
3/4 steps

Sign Up and See Pricing

"You must agree to out terms of services and privacy policy"
Back
Get Offer

Muslim Holy Day Eid

Hire a Professional Writer Now

The input space is limited by 250 symbols

Deadline:2 days left
"You must agree to out terms of services and privacy policy"
Write my paper

Common greetings during this holiday are the Arabic greeting ‘Id mubarak (“Blessed Eid”) or ‘Id sa‘id (“Happy Eid”). In addition, many countries have their own greetings based on local language and traditions. Typically, Muslims wake up relatively late in the morning—always after sunrise—and have a small breakfast (as a sign of not being on a fast on that day) of preferably the date fruit, before attending a special Eid prayer (salah) that is performed in congregation at mosques or open areas like fields, squares etc.

Muslims are encouraged to dress in their best clothes (new if possible) for the occasion.

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Muslim Holy Day Eid
Just from $13,9/Page
Get custom paper

No adhan or iqama (Call) is to be pronounced for this Eid prayer, and it consists of only two raka? ats. The Eid prayer is followed by the khutbah (sermon) and then a supplication (dua’) asking for forgiveness, mercy and help for all living beings across the world. The khutbah also instructs Muslims as to the performance of rituals of Eid, such as the zakat.

[2] It is then customary to embrace the persons sitting on either side of oneself, whilst greeting them. After the prayers, people also visit their relatives, friends and acquaintances. Islamic tradition

Eid al-Fitr marks the end of the fasting of Ramadan. This has to do with the communal aspects of the fast, which expresses many of the basic values of the Muslim community. Fasting is believed by some scholars to extol fundamental distinctions, lauding the power of the spiritual realm, while acknowledging the subordination of the physical realm. [3] Practices by country United Kingdom There is a Khutbah (sermon) in which the Imam gives advice to the Muslim community and usually Muslims are encouraged to end any past animosities they may have.

He then goes on to the khutbah and then the prayer itself. When the local imam declares Eid Al-Fitr everyone greets and hugs each other. As Eid Al-Fitr is not a recognised public holiday in the United Kingdom, Muslims are obliged to attend the morning prayer. In a large ethnically Muslim area, normally schools and local businesses give exemptions to the Muslim community to take three days off. In the rest of the UK it is not recognised as it is not on a fixed date as it is decided by the sighting of the moon on the night before.

During the morning, men usually wear thawb, jubba, sherwani, and women usually wear salwar kameez. Men and women go to the mosque for the Eid prayers, after which people greet each other. After this many will go to a local cemetery to pay respect and to remember the deceased. When they return home they will greet family, friends, other Muslims and visit relatives across the city. People cook traditional food for their relatives. Bengali dishes such as samosas, Siweya, rice and Handesh, Noonor Bora, and fulab are particularly popular. Turkey

Traditional Bayram wishes from the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, stating “Let us love, Let us be loved”, in the form of mahya lights stretched across the minarets of the Blue Mosque in IstanbulIn Turkey, where Ramadan celebrations are infused with more national traditions, and where country-wide celebrations, are referred to as Bayram. It is customary for people to greet one another with “Bayram? n? z Kutlu Olsun” or “Bayram? n? z Mubarek Olsun” (“May Your Bayram Be Holy”). “Mutlu Bayramlar” (“Happy Bayram”) is an alternative phrase for celebrating Bayram.

Referred to as both Seker Bayram? (“Bayram of Sweets”) or Ramazan Bayram? (“Ramadan Bayram”), Eid in Turkey is a public holiday, where schools and government offices are generally closed for the entire period of the celebrations. It is a time for people to attend prayer services, put on their best clothes (referred to as “Bayraml? k”, often purchased just for the occasion) and to visit all their loved ones (such as friends, relatives and neighbors) and pay their respects to the deceased with organized visits to cemeteries, where large, temporary bazaars of flowers, water (for watering he plants adorning a grave), and prayer books are set up for the three-day occasion. The first day of the Bayram is generally regarded as the most important, with all members of the family waking up early, and the men going to their neighborhood mosque for the special Bayram prayer. It is regarded as especially important to honor elderly citizens by kissing their right hand and placing it on one’s forehead while wishing them Bayram greetings.

It is also customary for young children to go around their neighborhood, door to door, and wish everyone a happy Bayram, for which they are awarded candy, chocolates, traditional sweets such as Baklava and Turkish Delight, or a small amount of money at every door, in an almost Halloween-like fashion. Municipalities all around the country organize fundraising events for the poor, in addition to public shows such as concerts or more traditional forms of entertainment such as the Karagoz and Hacivat shadow-theatre and even performances by the Mehter – the Janissary Band that was founded during the days of the Ottoman Empire.

Helping the less fortunate, ending past animosities and making up, organizing breakfasts and dinners for loved ones and putting together neighborhood celebrations are all part of the occasion, where homes and streets are decorated and lit up for the celebrations, and television and radio channels continuously broadcast a variety of special Bayram programs, which include movie specials, musical programming and celebratory addresses from celebrities and politicians alike

Iran In the predominantly Shia culture of Iran, Eid is a highly personal event, and celebrations are often more muted. Called Eyde Fetr by most Iranians, charity is important on that day. Visiting the elderly and gathering with families and friends is also very common. Typically, each Muslim family gives food to those in need. Payment of fitra or fetriye is obligatory for each Muslim.

Often meat or ghorbani (literally translated as sacrifice, for it is usually a young lamb or calf that is sacrificed for the occasion), which is an expensive food item in Iran, will be given by those in wealthier families to those who have less. The offering of meat is generally a part of the Eid-ul-Azha celebrations and sacrifices (Qurban) are generally not given during the Eid-ul-fitr celebrations.

Cite this Muslim Holy Day Eid

Muslim Holy Day Eid. (2018, Jun 19). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/muslim-holy-day-eid-essay/

Show less
  • Use multiple resourses when assembling your essay
  • Get help form professional writers when not sure you can do it yourself
  • Use Plagiarism Checker to double check your essay
  • Do not copy and paste free to download essays
Get plagiarism free essay

Search for essay samples now

Haven't found the Essay You Want?

Get my paper now

For Only $13.90/page