What Does Old Money Vs. New Money Mean In The Great Gatsby?

Updated: November 28, 2022
In The Great Gatsby, old money refers to families who have been wealthy for generations, while new money refers to families who have only recently become wealthy.
Detailed answer:

What does “old money” vs. “new money” mean in The Great Gatsby?

In the novel The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald uses the terms “old money” and “new money” to describe two different types of families. The term “new money” refers to those with wealth that has been gained more recently; while the term “old money” refers to those whose wealth has been acquired over generations.

The main characters in The Great Gatsby are all associated with one of these two groups of people. Daisy Buchanan is an example of a character associated with old money, while the main character Jay Gatsby is associated with new money.

Old money families are often seen as being more sophisticated and having more class than those with new money. They tend to be more conservative in their spending and more reluctant to flaunt their wealth than new money families do. Old money families are also often associated with traditional values, while new money families are seen as more progressive. In short, old money families are often considered snobbish and elitist, while new money families are considered warmer and friendlier.

What Does Old Money Vs. New Money Mean In The Great Gatsby?. (2022, Sep 22). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/qa/what-does-old-money-vs-new-money-mean-in-the-great-gatsby/