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Solution-Blessed Brief Pastoral Counseling Project

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by Amy Tahran L22263350 Presented to John Hobbs, In partial fulfillment of the requirements for PACO 500 Introduction to Pastoral Counseling Liberty Theological Seminary Lynchburg, VA 12 August 2011 ABSTRACT For this project, I am placing myself in a hypothetical context as a staff pastoral counselor at my home church in Valley City, ND, serving a congregation of approximately 200. I have chosen as my overarching goal for life to serve others in the capacity for which the Lord has gifted me and prepared me to counsel and minister to them.

Peter 4:9 tells us that, “Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms. ” I believe that serving in a counseling role is my gift, and that it is my calling to use that gift to serve others, and in doing so, to obey God. My counseling approach will be a solution-focused, brief pastoral counseling model influenced greatly by Charles Kollar’s Solution-Focused Pastoral Counseling, David Benner’s Strategic Pastoral Counseling, and Hawkins’ Pastoral Assessment Model and Counseling Scenario.

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The client I have chosen to serve for this project is Brody, the youngest remaining child in the case study based on the Hallmark movie Crossroads: a Story of Forgiveness. Brody is attending counseling in an attempt to improve his family relationships and to process the recent deaths of his mother and younger sister. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………2 Part I: The Counseling Setting…………………………………………………………………. 4 Part 2: The Counselor’s Relational Style…………………………………………………….. Part 3: The Counseling Strategy/Structure……………………………………………………9 Phase 1…………………………………………………9 Phase 2……………………………………………….. 10 Phase 3………………………………………………12 Phase 4………………………………………………. 12 Part 4: The Counseling Summation…………………………………………………………. 13 References………………………………………………………………………………….. 14 Appendices………………………………………………………………………………….. 15 Grading Rubric…………………………………………………………………………….. 27 Part 1; The Counseling Setting Rationale for Solution-Blessed Brief Pastoral Counseling

Charles Kollar states that, “In Christian theology the solution to personal sin is not found in understanding the root cause of sin, i. e. , understanding the doctrine of original sin. Rather, it is through turning from sin to God’s grace, being thankful for being forgiven, acting upon this forgiveness, and maturing within God’s grace in a constructive and creative way” (41). In light of this statement, and our belief in grace and forgiveness, we can expect that solution focused pastoral counseling can provide guidance and change to those who seek assistance.

We recognize that searching for the root cause of the “problem” “often intensifies and maintains the problem”; whereas solution focused pastoral counseling offers opportunities to identify the behaviors, words and/or actions which may be maintaining the problem and looks for solutions to encourage a change, often in a minimal amount of sessions. The goal of counseling with the solution focused brief approach is “to gracefully suggest the possibility of life without the problem” to the client and to assist them with alternative ways in which to perceive their world (Kollar, pg. 50). What is Solution Blessed Brief Pastoral Counseling?

This is probably best defined by breaking down the phrase into definitions of each aspect as follows: Solution Blessed-The focus of our sessions will not be the “problem,” but rather, we will focus on solutions. Solution focused counseling begets a more hopeful approach and research indicates that this type of counseling tends to be more effective than a problem focused orientation. Solution Blessed counseling incorporates the belief that our Heavenly Father has equipped each of us with the necessary tools and talents to solve our problems with guidance from scripture and the Holy Spirit.

Brief-Simply put, our sessions will be limited to six sessions, each ranging from 30-50 minutes in length. Pastoral-As leaders of the church, pastors are in a position to offer soul care and counseling to their congregation. Equipped with theological understanding coupled with education and experience in counseling, pastors are uniquely qualified to offer support in the realm of mental health. Counseling-Purposeful conversations between the counselor and the counselee, resulting in clear, realistic expectations of the outcome of the sessions.

Confidentiality: Confidentiality is a core ethical requirement regarding information shared between the counselee and the counselor. Counseles can be assured that information shared in sessions will be held to the strictest confidence; however, counselees must be made aware that there are instances where the counselor is required to break confidentiality. Information shared by the counselee regarding actual or threatened harm to self or others must be reported to the proper authorities. Homework: There may be take-home assignments for the counselee to complete between sessions.

Homework is a useful tool and may include outside readings, observations, journaling, worksheets, etc. Note-taking: The counselor may take notes during sessions. These notes will remain confidential and most often consist of positive comments or ideas that the counselor wishes to incorporate based on input from the counselee. Termination: The termination process will begin to take place during session 4, at which time the counselee will be reminded of the upcoming final session and begin the process of terminating the counseling relationship.

Follow-up or “check-in” sessions may take place if determined necessary by the counselor or counselee. Referral process: If it is determined that the counselee requires services that are more in-depth than what can be accomplished with the pastoral counselor, an outside referral may be deemed necessary. Most often, this is not the case; however, should the need arise, the pastoral counselor will work with the counselee to transition to outside care as seamlessly as possible. Guiding Assumptions of SBBPC

In accordance with the solution focused approach, we believe in the following assumptions to support our approach: “ (1) God has given us the ability to create solutions, (2) the solutions can be described and clarified, (3) more than one outcome to counseling can be created, (4) the counselor and the counselee can do the creating and clarifying together, (5) we create solutions as a joint effort with God’s preparation, and (6) this process can be taught” (Kollar, pg. 44). Part II: The Counselor’s Relational Style

It is imperative that as someone in a counseling role, I know myself well. Failure to examine and understand my own strengths and weaknesses would greatly diminish my effectiveness as a counselor. As part of my self understanding and exploration, I have taken the “Uniquely You Spiritual Gifts and 4 DISC Personality Types” profiler which identifies my spiritual gifts in the areas of encouraging, teaching and administering, with my strongest gifting in encouraging/exhorting. These traits are assets to me as a counselor, where I often find myself in an encouraging and teaching role.

Specifically in the area of encouraging/exhorting, the profiler states that, “Christians with the Gift of Encouraging find themselves exhorting others. They are compelled to give advice. As counselors, they seem to often have steps of action. While Prophets declare truth and Teachers clarify truth, Encouragers / Exhorters like to tell you what to do with truth. They bless others with a strong sense of concern. Often looking to encourage others, they are sought out as counselors. People find Encouragers friendly, understanding and practical. They enjoy using their communication skills to share specific insights. One potential negative that I must be aware of, though, is a tendency to talk too much. With this in mind, and armed with the expectation and understanding that the Lord has fully equipped my counselees with the abilities to find solutions to their problems, I will work towards encouraging changes proposed by my counselee rather than giving advice and leading my counselees towards my solutions to their problems. The “Uniquely You” profiler identified my behavioral blends as being a C/S/D in response to how I believe others expect me to behave. This outcome was rather surprising to me.

C/S/D blends are identified as cautious, stable and direct. I am identified as having a more passive and reserved personality. C/S/Ds perceive that others expect them “to be direct, submissive, and competent. You tend to be more passive, but you sometimes surprise people with your dominant ways. You can be active and decisive, but your sweet, sensitive, compliant, and conscientious feelings seem to balance any abrasiveness or forcefulness you might exhibit. You don’t tend to be talkative or a crowd pleaser. You seem to think people expect you to be more quiet and shy.

You often don’t consider yourself as reserved because of your aggressive and assertive tendencies. There is a part of you that doesn’t like to constantly sit still and wait for things to happen. You like to be in charge while cautiously moving forward. You also like helping those who may be hesitant or need more assurance. You tend to plan and prepare more than others, but you don’t always communicate it well to the masses. ” Some of the recommendations included being more enthusiastic and positive, being more outwardly encouraging and optimistic, and letting my sensitivity be more evident.

These recommendations were surprising because I tend to be enthusiastic and optimistic with others commenting frequently about my positive outlook and outward enthusiasm. This being said, I can relate to the statement that I seem to think people expect me to be more quiet and shy and that I don’t consider myself to be reserved. With my spiritual gifts and personality blend in mind, I will be better equipped to counsel Brody. As an encourager, I will work to assist Brody to identify his own strengths and solutions.

As a teacher, I will work with Brody to help him learn coping and communication skills and methods of recognizing instances of positive change. I will also utilize my gifts in planning and step-by-step approaches to change to assist him in identifying his goal and finding ways to reach it. Part III: The Counseling Strategy/Structure Phase 1 My initial meeting with Brody is initiated by him and is focused on identifying the problem, which is accomplished by utilizing effective listening skills and the fact that the Brody is focused on the problem.

Brody and I are familiar with one another as he has been active in the church in various teen groups. His family has a strong faith, which is an asset as we embark on our sessions with one another. Brody has initiated this meeting, seemingly as a last resort because he has been unable thus far to get assistance from friends or other family members in regards to his problem. Brody identifies his reason for seeking counseling as being “alone” now that his mother and sister, who were his primary means of emotional support, are deceased.

Brody’s father is consumed with his own grief and the two have never had a strong connection. Brody claims that his dad “just doesn’t understand” him and that since the deaths occurred, the distance between him and his father has increased to the point where Brody feels that his dad “doesn’t even know [he] exists. Once the session is underway, the floodgates have opened and Brody expresses his anger and frustration towards his father, his feelings of grief over the loss of his mother and sister, and his feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Brody fights to hold back the tears, but once he begins talking, the sobs cannot be contained. I essentially offered nothing more than a willing ear and a comment of, “You’ve been through a lot recently, Brody, and I can see that you’re hurting” which was enough to encourage him to release a litany of feelings that he seems to have been holding back for quite some time. As he struggles to regain his composure, I offer to leave the room to allow him the opportunity to collect himself. While I’m out of the oom, I offer a prayer to God, the ultimate counselor, to continue to work through me with His Holy Spirit to offer comfort and hope to this fragile young man. When I return, I ask Brody if he’d allow me to pray with him and he accepts. We agree to meet again the following week. Phase 2 In this session, Brody will be identifying his preferred story. Through this process, we will work together to identify some positive interactions between him and his father and identify a clear goal for our counseling.

After a minute or two of small talk, I offer a quick recap of some of the concerns and frustrations Brody had brought up at our last meeting. I then move to the miracle question, “Brody, if a miracle happened tonight while you were sleeping regarding your relationship with your dad, what would be different in the morning that would demonstrate to you that the miracle occurred? ” Brody thinks about this for a while and tells me that “If a miracle occurred, my dad would wake me up in the morning like he used to do when I was little. He used to come into my room and lightly tickle my feet until I woke up. He smiles at the memory. Brody goes on, “We would eat breakfast together and at the end of the day, Dad would be home from work in time to have supper with me. We’d talk about our day. Dad would be genuinely interested in me and what I like to do. ” I respond by saying, “You’d like to feel like your father is present. You wish he would acknowledge the things that are important to you like your music. ” Brody nods. I ask Brody to identify on a scale of 1 to 10 how connected he feels with his father with a 1 indicating no connection and a 10 indicating a very strong connection.

Brody indicates that he feels like he’s at a “1” right now. I ask Brody what it would take to move him up a notch and he tells me that any interaction with his dad would be an improvement. With this knowledge in hand, I assign Brody the homework of consciously noticing and being alert to those times when his dad might be displaying an attempt to connect with Brody. I am aware that his dad may be making attempts that simply aren’t registering with Brody because the two have such distinctly different personalities and interests.

We pray together and agree to meet again in a week. Session 3: At our next meeting, I begin with the scaling question and Brody indicates that he has moved up to a “3” to which I respond, “Well, that sounds like progress. Tell me what caused you to move up two notches on the scale. ” Brody’s “homework” forced him to pay closer attention to his father and also forced him to simply be in his father’s presence more frequently. Prior to this, Brody would tend to isolate himself in his room, but that wasn’t possible when he was looking for ways that his dad attempted to connect.

Simply by getting out of his room and into the family living space more often, Brody’s and his father were basically forced to acknowledge one another’s presence which, in turn, presented greater opportunities for interaction. This encouraged interactions and conversations which simply couldn’t happen previously because the two men would isolate themselves. This exercise also pushed Brody to make himself more open to his father’s sometimes awkward attempts to interact, forming the beginning basis for the two to become more connected with one another.

When I pointed this out to Brody, he began to “get it. ” We then moved into phase 3 of the counseling process where we began to clarify the goal and partner toward a solution. Phase 3 Now that Brody is beginning to have hope, we will work on identifying some specific ways for him to continue to progress toward his overarching goal of building a relationship with his father. Brody has become aware of the fact that his simple act of placing himself in areas of the house where his father is present increases the likelihood that some positive interactions will occur.

I ask Brody what he plans to do to continue to increase those opportunities, and Brody becomes visibly more positive and excited. He makes a plan to spend the majority of his time at home outside of his room. I encourage him by telling him that’s a great idea. I ask Brody to report back to me next week. Brody and I also continue our discussion about the next session, which will be our last. I have reminded him at the conclusion of each of our sessions that we will only be meeting 5 times. Phase 4 As we conclude our counseling in this final session, it is important to focus on identifying sources of support for Brody within the church family.

As mentioned before, Brody has been active in our youth activities and classes throughout his life, so the youth pastor is an obvious support for him. I also arrange a meeting between Brody and our praise team coordinator. With Brody’s talent and passion for music, the two have some common ground upon which to build a positive Christian relationship. Brody indicates that his current level of connectedness with dad has now increased to a “5. ” He is very excited to share with me that he and his father have been connecting throughout the day and talking more and he feels that they are really beginning to build a relationship.

This is exciting news and I encourage Brody to continue to be open and available for continuing these interactions with his dad. Brody and his father are planning to attend the Christian music festival together this fall, which will hopefully provide them with some much needed bonding time. As we terminate our sessions, I do make sure that Brody is set up with the supports identified and that he is feeling confident in his abilities to continue working towards his goal. I encourage him to pop in and touch base with me once in a while to let me know how things are going.

We pray together for continued growth. Part 4: The Counseling Summation As I review our sessions together, I feel satisfied and quite pleased with the progress Brody has accomplished in our short time together. By listening, reflecting and encouraging Brody we were able to establish an effective relationship and he was able to identify goals and make steady progress towards attaining his goal. I utilized staging and the miracle question to help Brody identify the changes he would like to see and encouraged him and provided positive feedback on his progress.

Through a reflective praxis of goal formation, resource and needs assessment, accessing the key assumptions of SFPC, cultivating commitment to action and experience of demonstrating fit, I perceive that I did well in these areas. My colleagues in the church office function as my collaborators and mentors as I process the counseling sessions. By meeting regularly with my senior pastor, I am held accountable and able to ask for prayer, guidance and feedback; all of which assists me as I endeavor to become more holy and allow the Holy Spirit to work through me as a counselor.

References Bener, David G. 2003. Strategic pastoral counseling: a short-term nodel. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic. Clinton, Tim and Ron Hawkins. 2007. Biblical counseling quick reference guide. Nashville: Thomas Nelson. Cloud, Henry. 2004. Nine things you simply must do to succeed in love and life. Nashville: Thomas Nelson. Hawkins, Ronald E. 2008. The pastoral counseling scenario: Parts 1-4. Lynchburg: Liberty University. Hawkins, Ronald E. 2009. Pastoral assessment model powerpoint presentation. Lynchburg: Liberty University. Killar, Charles A. 1997.

Solution-focused pastoral counseling: an effective short-term approach for getting people back on track. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. Peterson, James C. 2007. Why don’t we listen better? Communicating and connecting in relationships. Tigard: Petersen Publications. Steward, Gary P. 2008. A case study on crossroads: a story of forgiveness. Lynchburg: Liberty University APPENDIX A: OVERVIEW OF SBBPC What is SBBPC? This is probably best defined by breaking down the phrase into definitions of each aspect as follows: Solution Blessed-The focus of our sessions will not be the “problem,” but rather, we will focus on solutions.

Solution focused counseling begets a more hopeful approach and research indicates that this type of counseling tends to be more effective than a problem focused orientation. Solution Blessed counseling incorporates the belief that our Heavenly Father has equipped each of us with the necessary tools and talents to solve our problems with guidance from scripture and the Holy Spirit. Brief-Simply put, our sessions will be limited to six sessions, each ranging from 30-50 minutes in length.

Pastoral-As leaders of the church, pastors are in a position to offer soul care and counseling to their congregation. Equipped with theological understanding coupled with education and experience in counseling, pastors are uniquely qualified to offer support in the realm of mental health,. Counseling-Purposeful conversations between the counselor and the counselee, resulting in clear, realistic expectations of the outcome of the sessions. Confidentiality: Confidentiality is a core ethical requirement regarding information shared between the counselee and the counselor.

You can be assured that information shared in our sessions will be held to the strictest confidence; however, you must be made aware that there are instances where the counselor is required to break confidentiality. Information shared by you, the counselee, regarding actual or threatened harm to self or others must be reported to the proper authorities. Homework: There may be take-home assignments for the counselee to complete between sessions. Homework is a useful tool and may include outside readings, observations, journaling, worksheets, etc.

Note-taking: Your counselor may take notes during your sessions. These notes will remain confidential and most often consist of positive comments or ideas that the counselor wishes to incorporate based on input from the counselee. Termination: The termination process will begin to take place during session 4, at which time we will remind you of the upcoming final session and begin the process of terminating the counseling relationship. Follow-up or “check-in” sessions may take place if determined necessary by the counselor or counselee.

Referral process: If it is determined that the counselee requires services that are more in-depth than what can be accomplished with the pastoral counselor, an outside referral may be deemed necessary. Most often, this is not the case; however, should the need arise, the pastoral counselor will work with the counselee to transition to outside care as seamlessly as possible. APPENDIX B: STATEMENT OF BELIEFS We believe in one God-the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We believe that the Old and New Testament Scriptures, given by plenary inspiration, contain all truth necessary to faith and Christian living.

We believe that man is born with a fallen nature, and is, therefore, inclined to evil, and that continually  We believe that the finally impenitent are hopelessly and eternally lost. We believe that the atonement through Jesus Christ is for the whole human race; and that whosoever repents and believes on the Lord Jesus Christ is justified and regenerated and saved from the dominion of sin. We believe that believers are to be sanctified wholly, subsequent to regeneration, through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. We believe that the Holy Spirit bears witness to the new birth, and also to the entire sanctification of believers.

We believe that our Lord will return, the dead will be raised, and the final judgment will take place. APPENDIX C: ETHICAL GUIDELINES I will follow the ethical code found at the American Association of Pastoral Counselors website. Web address: http://aapc. org/content/code-ethics-1 AAPC CODE OF ETHICS AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PASTORAL COUNSELORS (Amended April, 2010) PRINCIPLE I – PROLOGUE 1 The AAPC Code of Ethics may be reproduced only after contacting the AAPC Association Office to insure that the most current copy of the Code can be provided. The use of “member”, “we”, “us”, and “our” refers to and is binding upon all levels of individual and institutional membership and affiliation of AAPC. PRINCIPLE I – PROLOGUE As members2 of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, we are respectful of the various theologies, traditions, and values of our faith communities and committed to the dignity and worth of each individual. We are dedicated to advancing the welfare of those who seek our assistance and to the maintenance of high standards of professional conduct and competence.

As pastoral counselors and pastoral counseling students we are accountable for our work regardless of our professional functions, the settings in which we work, or the populations which we serve. This accountability is expressed in our conduct of relationships with clients, colleagues, students, our faith communities, and through the acceptance and practice of the principles and procedures of this Code of Ethics. The Code articulates standards that the Association will use to determine whether pastoral counselors have engaged in unethical conduct.

In subscribing to this Code, pastoral counselors are required to be knowledgeable of these standards, cooperate with association procedures for responding to complaints of ethical misconduct, participate in AAPC adjudication proceedings, and abide by any AAPC disciplinary rulings or sanctions. The Ethics Code is not intended to be a basis of civil liability. Whether a pastoral counselor has violated the Ethics Code standards does not by itself determine whether the pastoral counselor is legally liable in a court action, whether a contract is enforceable, or whether other legal consequences occur. A.

To affirm the importance of being both spiritually grounded and psychologically informed. B. To maintain responsible association with the faith group with which we identify and in which we may have ecclesiastical standing. C. To avoid discriminating against or refusing employment, educational opportunity or professional assistance to anyone on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, health status ,age, disabilities or national origin; provided that nothing herein shall limit a member or center from utilizing religious requirements or exercising a religious preference in employment decisions.

D. As members of AAPC we recognize our responsibility to stay current with research that affects our understanding of clinical issues and the conduct of our practice. We agree at all levels of membership to continuing education and professional growth including supervision, consultation, and active participation in the meetings and affairs of the Association. E. To seek out and engage in collegial relationships, recognizing that isolation can lead to a loss of perspective and judgment. F.

To manage our personal lives in a healthful fashion and to seek appropriate assistance for our own personal problems or conflicts G. To assess/evaluate, diagnose or provide treatment only for those problems or issues that are within the reasonable boundaries of our competence. H. To establish and maintain appropriate professional relationship boundaries. We will make every effort to be transparent with congregations and other public constituencies about the boundaries we hold. I. To remain abreast of and to comply with appropriate regulatory statues that governs our pastoral counseling activities.

Whenever the AAPC Code differs with legal mandates, pastoral counseling licensure laws, or with ecclesiastical policies, the more stringent of the two applies. J. To promote racial justice and develop multicultural competence as part of our practice. PRINCIPLE II – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES In all professional matters members of AAPC maintain practices that protect the public and advance the profession. A. We use our knowledge and professional associations for the benefit of the people we serve and not to secure unfair personal advantage.

B. We clearly represent our level of membership and limit our practice to that level. Publication of practice or agency material clearly explains the levels of membership that apply to individuals. C. Fees and financial arrangements, as with all contractual matters, are always discussed without hesitation or equivocation at the onset and are established in a straight-forward, professional manner. D. We are prepared to render service to individuals and communities in crisis without regard to financial remuneration when necessary. E.

We neither receive nor pay a commission for referral of a client. F. We conduct our practice, agency, regional and association fiscal affairs with due regard to recognized business and accounting procedures. We respect the prerogatives and obligations of the institutions, agencies, or organizations by whom we are employed or with which we associate. G. Upon the transfer of a pastoral counseling practice or the sale of real, personal, tangible or intangible property or assets used in such practice, the privacy and well being of the client shall be of primary concern. . Client names and records shall be excluded from the transfer or sale. b. Any fees paid shall be for services rendered, consultation, equipment, real estate, and the name and logo of the counseling agency. c. We provide recent and current clients information regarding the closing or transferring of our practice and assure the confidentiality of their records. H. We are careful to represent facts truthfully to clients, referral sources, and third party payers regarding credentials and services rendered.

We shall correct any misrepresentation of our professional qualifications or affiliations. I. We do not malign other professionals, nor do we plagiarize or otherwise present, distribute, or publish another’s work as our own. PRINCIPLE III CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS It is the responsibility of members of AAPC to maintain relationships with clients on a professional basis. We take all reasonable steps to avoid harming our clients and to safeguard the welfare of those with whom we work. A. We do not abandon or neglect clients.

We make reasonable efforts to ensure continuity of services in the event that services are interrupted by factors such as unavailability, relocation, illness, or disability. If we are unwilling for appropriate reasons, to provide professional help or continue a professional relationship, every reasonable effort is made to arrange for continuation of treatment with another professional. Prior to leaving an agency or practice we complete all files and paper work is documented and signed. B. We make only realistic statements regarding the pastoral counseling process and its outcome.

We inform our clients of the purpose of the counseling, risks related to counseling, possible limits to the services because of third party payer limits, reasonable alternatives, clients rights to refuse or withdraw consent, and the time frame covered by the consent. We take reasonable steps to make sure the client understands the counseling process and has the opportunity to ask questions. C. We show sensitive regard for the moral, social, and religious values and beliefs of clients and communities. We avoid imposing our beliefs on others, although we may express them when appropriate in the pastoral counseling process.

D. Counseling relationships are continued only so long as it is reasonably clear that the clients are benefiting from the relationship. E. We recognize the trust placed in and unique power of the therapeutic relationship. While acknowledging the complexity of some pastoral relationships, we avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of clients. We avoid those dual or multiple relationships with clients which could impair our professional judgment, compromise the integrity of the treatment, and/or use the relationship for our own gain.

A multiple relationship occurs when a pastoral counselor is in a professional role with a person and 1) at the same time is in another role with the same person, 2) at the same time is in a relationship with a person closely associated with or related to the person with whom the pastoral counselor has the professional relationship, or 3) promises to enter into another relationship in the future with the person or a person closely associated with or related to the person.

In instances when dual or multiple relationships are unavoidable, particularly within congregations or in family or couples counseling, we take reasonable steps to protect the clients and are responsible for setting clear and appropriate boundaries. F. We do not engage in harassment, abusive words or actions, or exploitative coercion of clients or former clients. G. All forms of sexual behavior or harassment with clients are unethical, even when a client invites or consents to such behavior or involvement.

Sexual behavior is defined as, but not limited to, all forms of overt and covert seductive speech, gestures, written communication, and behavior as well as physical contact of a sexual nature; harassment is defined as but not limited to, repeated comments, gestures, written communication, or physical contacts of a sexual nature. H. We recognize that the therapist/client relationship involves a power imbalance, the residual effects of which are operative following the termination of the therapy relationship.

Therefore, all sexual behavior or harassment as defined in Principle III G, with former clients is unethical. Interactive long-distance counseling delivery, when the client resides in one location and the pastoral counselor in another, may be utilized to supplement but not to completely replace face-to-face therapy. We take all reasonable steps to ensure that the client understands the limits of long-distance therapy, the computer application, what it is used for, and its possible effects. PRINCIPLE IV CONFIDENTIALITY

As members of AAPC we respect the integrity and protect the welfare of all persons with whom we are working and have an obligation to safeguard information about them that has been obtained in the course of the counseling process. We have a responsibility to know and understand civil laws and administrative rules that govern confidentiality requirements of our profession in the setting of our work. A. All records kept on a client are stored under lock and key and are disposed of in a manner that assures security and confidentiality. Records should be maintained for the number of years required appropriate government regulatory statues. B. We take reasonable steps to ensure that documentation in records is accurate and reflects the services provided. Such documentation is intended to facilitate provision of services later by other professionals, meet institutional requirements, ensure accuracy of billing and payments, and ensure compliance with law. C. We recognize that confidentiality belongs to the client. We treat all communications from clients with professional confidence and take reasonable precautions to protect confidential information obtained through or stored in any medium.

These precautions include an awareness of the limited confidentiality guarantees of electronics communication. D. Except in those situations where the identity of the client is necessary to the understanding of the case, we use only the first names of our clients when engaged in supervision or consultation. It is our responsibility to convey the importance of confidentiality to the supervisor/consultant; this is particularly important when the supervision is shared by other professionals, as in a supervisory group. E.

We do not disclose client confidences to anyone, except: as mandated by law; to prevent a clear and immediate danger to someone; in the course of a civil, criminal or disciplinary action arising from the counseling where the pastoral counselor is a defendant; for purposes of supervision or consultation; or by previously obtained written permission. In cases involving more than one person (as client) written permission must be obtained from all legally accountable persons who have been present during the counseling before any disclosure can be made.

F. We disclose confidential information for appropriate reasons only with valid written consent from the client or a person legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client. We obtain informed written consent of clients before audio and/or video tape recording or permitting third party observation of their sessions. G. We do not use these standards of confidentiality to avoid intervention when it is necessary, e. g. , when there is evidence of abuse of minors, the elderly, the disabled, the physically or mentally incompetent. H.

When current or former clients are referred to in a publication, while teaching or in a public presentation, their identity is thoroughly disguised. I. We as members of AAPC agree that as an express condition of our membership in the Association, Association ethics communications, files, investigative reports, and related records are strictly confidential and waive their right to use same in a court of law to advance any claim against another member. Any member seeking such records for such purpose shall be subject to disciplinary action for attempting to violate the confidentiality requirements of the organization.

This policy is intended to promote pastoral and confessional communications without legal consequences and to protect potential privacy and confidentiality interests of third parties. PRINCIPLE V SUPERVISEE, STUDENT & EMPLOYEE RELATIONSHIPS As members of AAPC we have an ethical concern for the integrity and welfare of our supervisees, students and employees. These relationships are maintained on a professional and confidential basis. We recognize our influential position with regard to both current and former supervisees, students and employees, and avoid exploiting their trust and dependency.

We make every effort to avoid dual relationships with such persons that could impair our judgment or increase the risk of personal and/or financial exploitation. A. We do not engage in ongoing counseling relationships with current supervisees, students and employees. B. We do not engage in sexual or other harassment of supervisees, students, employees, research subjects or colleagues. C. All forms of sexual behavior, as defined in Principle III. G, with our supervisees, students, research subjects and employees (except in employee situations involving domestic partners) are unethical.

D. We advise our students, supervisees, and employees against offering or engaging in, or holding themselves out as competent to engage in, professional services beyond their training, level of experience and competence. E. Supervisors have a responsibility to provide timely and fair evaluations of their supervisees and employees. F. We do not harass or dismiss an employee who has acted in a reasonable, responsible and ethical manner to protect, or intervene on behalf of, a client or other member of the public or another employee. G.

To protect the public, employers and supervisors who have dismissed employees and supervisees for ethical cause must report that fact as part of any official report of service or enrollment in a pastoral counseling center or training program. H. We are sensitive to the requirements of an organization with which we are affiliated or for whom we are working. In case of conflict with the Code of Ethics and the organization, we clarify the nature of the conflict, make known our commitment to the Code of Ethics, and to the extent feasible, resolve the conflict in a way that permits adherence to the Code.

PRINCIPLE VI INTERPROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS As members of AAPC we relate to and cooperate with other professional persons in our community and beyond. We are part of a network of health care professionals and are expected to develop and maintain interdisciplinary and interprofessional relationships. A. We do not offer ongoing clinical services to persons currently receiving treatment from another professional without prior knowledge of and in consultation with the other professional, with the clients’ informed consent. Soliciting such clients is unethical. B.

We exercise care and interprofessional courtesy when approached for services by persons who claim or appear to have inappropriately terminated treatment with another professional. PRINCIPLE VII ADVERTISING Any advertising by or for a member of AAPC, including announcements, public statements and promotional activities, is undertaken with the purpose of helping the public make informed judgments and choices. A. We do not misrepresent our professional qualifications, affiliations and functions, or falsely imply sponsorship or certification by any organization. B.

We may use the following information to describe ourselves and the services we provide: name; highest relevant academic degree earned from an accredited institution; date, type and level of certification or licensure; AAPC membership level, clearly stated; address and telephone number; office hours; a brief review of services offered, e. g. , individual, couple and group counseling; fee information; languages spoken; and policy regarding third party payments. Additional relevant information may be provided if it is legitimate, reasonable, free of deception and not otherwise prohibited by these principles.

We may not use the initials “AAPC” after our names in the manner of an academic degree. C. Announcements and brochures promoting our services describe them with accuracy and dignity, devoid of all claims or evaluation. We may send them to professional persons, religious institutions and other agencies, but to prospective individual clients only in response to inquiries. D. We do not make public statements which contain any of the following: 1. A false, fraudulent, misleading, deceptive or unfair statement. 2.

A misrepresentation of fact or a statement likely to mislead or deceive because in context it makes only a partial disclosure of relevant facts. 3. A testimonial from a client regarding the quality of services or products. 4. A statement intended or likely to create false or unjustified expectations of favorable results. 5. A statement implying unusual, unique, or oneofakind abilities, including misrepresentation through sensationalism, exaggeration or superficiality. 6. A statement intended or likely to exploit a client’s fears, anxieties or emotions. 7. A statement concerning the comparative desirability of offered services. . A statement of direct solicitation of individual clients. A. We do not compensate in any way a representative of the press, radio, television or other communication medium for the purpose of professional publicity and news items. A paid advertisement must be identified as such, unless it is contextually apparent that it is a paid advertisement. We are responsible for the content of such advertisement. Any advertisement to the public by radio or television is to be pre-recorded, approved by us and a recording of the actual transmission retained in our possession.

B. Advertisements, web postings or announcements by us of workshops, clinics, seminars, growth groups or similar services or endeavors, are to give a clear statement of purpose and a clear description of the experiences to be provided. The education, training and experience of the provider(s) involved are to be appropriately specified. PRINCIPLE VIII – RESEARCH A. Pastoral Counselors who are conducting research are responsible for assuring informed consent for all human subjects. Research participants must be informed about: 1.

Purpose and sponsorship of the research, expected duration, expected procedures, and the manner and scope of reporting on the findings of the research. 2. Their right to withdraw from participation at any time. 3. Any consequences of withdrawing from a research project. 4. Any discomfort or adverse effects of research procedures that would influence a subject’s willingness to participate. 5. Any benefits from participating in a research project. 6. A contact person for questions about the project or participant’s rights. B.

Pastoral Counselors take appropriate measures to protect research subjects who may also be receiving pastoral counseling servicers in schools, agencies, private practices, or churches in which research is conducted. This includes: 1. Taking steps to protect client/participants from any adverse consequences of declining or withdrawing a study. 2. Taking steps to assure clients are not exploited by research-related dual relationships. 3. Assuring that therapeutic services are not compromised by research procedures or goals. 4.

To the extent that services may be compromised by participation in research,   investigators seek the ethical advice of qualified professionals not directly involved in the investigation and observe safeguards to protect the rights of research participants. C. Pastoral Counselors guarantee confidentiality of information obtained from a  research participant unless confidentiality is waived in writing. When it is possible that information might be recognized by others (including family members) researchers disclose a plan for protecting confidentiality as part of informed consent. 1.

Pastoral Counselors consider the effects of research procedures on communities in which t takes place, and take adequate precautions to protect the integrity of these communities. 2. Pastoral Counselors comply with Federal standards and local institutional review procedures governing human subject research. When AAPC is a principal investigator, the Judicial Ethics Panel of AAPC will act as a review board to ensure compliance. 3. Pastoral Counselors are truthful in reporting research results. Pastoral Counselors: a. Do notplagiarize by presenting another’s work or data as one’s own; b.

Assure that research results are not presented or published in a    deceptive or manipulative manner;  c. Pastoral counselors do not withhold their research data, methods of analysis, or procedures from other qualified researchers who in good faith wish to replicate or validate research results, to the extent that confidentiality of research subjects can be guaranteed. SOLUTION-BASED, BRIEF PASTORAL COUNSELING (SBBPC) PROJECT GRADING GUIDELINES The following represents an additive grading rubric. Instead of beginning with 100 and losing points for errors, you begin with a 0 and earn points for your work.

In determining your grade, three questions will be asked: QUESTION VALUES TOTAL 100 POINTS ————————————————- INTRODUCTION OF SBBPC? Question Value: 15 Points * Abstract: Did it introduce context (2), overarching goal (2), and identify care seeker (2)? Points: 6 * Table of Contents: Organized with appropriate headings & subheadings (4), References (1), Appendix (Appendices identified) (2), and Grading Guideline (2)? Points: 9 ————————————————- PART 1 OF SBBPC: The Counseling Setting? Question Value: 30 Points Introduction: Overview of SBBPC w/rationale (5) & assumptions (5)Points: 10 * Pre-session Package: Essential elements explained (2), adequately prepared (2) & located in Appendix (6): Overview of SBBPC; Statement of Beliefs and/or Worldview; Ethical Guidelines; Intake Form(s); Informed Consent; and Referral Process? Points: 10 * Annotated References of 5 subjects: 3 Required – grief, anger, forgiveness; 2 student’s choice ; and 10 annotated entries/2 per subject? Points: 5 * Journal: Minimum of 7 substantive entries (Wk 1-7 = 1 per week)Points: 5 ————————————————-

PART 2 OF SBBPC: The Counselor’s Style? Question Value: 10 Points * Identified relational language, described relational style (integrated assessments and course materials)? Points: 5 * Explained plan for controlling Relational Style utilizing course resources and placed Action Plan in Appendix? Points: 5 ————————————————- PART 3 OF SBBPC: The Counseling Strategy/Structure? Question Value: 20 Points * P1: Use of assumptions, clear distinction of phase, aim, role and goal, skill set used to demonstrate fit in aligning w/counselee’s style? Points: 5 P2: Use of assumptions, clear distinction of phase, aim, role and goal, pastoral assessment, skill set used in collaborative goal description and identification of strengths and resources? Points: 5 * P3: Use of assumptions, clear distinction of phase, aim, role and goal, skill set used in collaborative development of vision clarification? Points: 5 * P4: Use of assumptions, clear distinction of phase, aim, role and goal, skill set used in consolidating change, and partnerships activated to support and secure change? Points: 5 ————————————————- PART 4 OF SBBPC: The Counseling Summation?

Question Value: 25 Points * Discussed the versatility of the supportive feedback technique? Points: 5 * Developed a procedure for reflexive praxis, identified/secured a Mentor/Friend, and developed debriefing guidelines? Points: 10 * SBBPC project was written according to graduate-level expectations, Formatted according to Turabian (7e) Reference Style Guidelines, utilized required resources and at least two secondary sources, Appendices (single-spaced) and consisted of no more than 40 pages (in its entirety)? Points: 10 Grade: Comments:

Cite this Solution-Blessed Brief Pastoral Counseling Project

Solution-Blessed Brief Pastoral Counseling Project. (2019, May 01). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/solution-blessed-brief-pastoral-counseling-project/

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