Calamansi background of the study Essay

A.Background of the Study
Body odour (esp., foot odour) is the body’s unpleasant smell that is caused by bacteria. The main cause of this is foot sweat. Actually, sweat itself is odourless, but it creates a beneficial environment for certain bacteria to grow and produce bad-smelling substances. These bacteria are naturally present on our skin as part of the human flora. More smell is created with factors that cause more sweating such as wearing shoes and socks with inadequate air ventilation for many hours. Hair on feet, especially on toes may contribute to the odours’ intensity by increasing its surface area where bacteria can thrive. Foot powder is a type of sweat-absorbing powder that helps prevent or remove foot odour. But some common foot powders aren’t as absorbent as the ideal foot powder. Some irritates the skin and some are expensive enough for consumers to reject. So therefore, the researchers thought of making such Calamansi Peel Foot Powder to provide a cheaper and a skin-friendly prevention for foot odour.

Calamansi, calamondin, Philippine lime – this versatile citrus fruit is the secret ingredient to many mouthwatering Filipino delicacies such as pancit palabok, Leyte kinilaw, beefsteak Tagalog, and arroz caldo. One of the most basic Filipino dipping sauces is made with soy sauce and calamansi juice, called toyomansi; and a simple, yet flavorful marinade is a blend of soy sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar, pepper, and garlic.

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While many growers see the calamansi as tiny decorative oranges and mostly ornamental, they are finding that the trees are problem free and easy to cultivate both indoors and out. They thrive inside the house in containers, as well as planted in the ground in tropical areas and zones with only occasional mild frosts. Calamansi is the result of a rare natural cross between two closely related genera, the Citrus and the Fortunella, and carries the characteristics of both the parents. The Fortunella parent, Kumquat, lends a dense shrubby habitat, small leaves and a hardy constitution, whereas the Citrus reticulata, Mandarin Orange, lends thorns, tasty fruit and ease of peeling. So the Calamansi has small, easy to peel fruit with the sour acid flavor.

In Central Florida, calamansi trees yield abundant fruit throughout the year. When the trees are covered in blossoms, they emit an intoxicatingly sweet beautiful fragrance that carries with the breeze. Many of my neighbors and co-workers have been introduced with baskets of this sour, thin skinned citrus, learning how to make a refreshing drink that tastes much like lemonade: squeeze and strain the juice of several calamansi, add cold water, and sugar or honey to taste. It’s a superb source of vitamin C and has a light, yet unique flavor equivalent to freshly made lemonade with a tangerine essence. The fruits can be used just like you would limes, key limes, or lemons. So even if you don’t know how to cook any Filipino dishes, you can use to marinade and baste grilled chicken, pork, and seafood, or squeeze into your iced tea, cola, or rum.

The calamansi fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples, and to deodorize underarms. It is also a popular home remedy for cough. In addition to these, homemakers are awed by its power to remove heavy stains on fabrics, and as a subsitute for any of the ways a lemon can clean the home.

Calamansi, calamondin, Philippine lime – this versatile citrus fruit is the secret ingredient to many mouthwatering Filipino delicacies such as pancit palabok, Leyte kinilaw, beefsteak Tagalog, and arroz caldo. One of the most basic Filipino dipping sauces is made with soy sauce and calamansi juice, called toyomansi; and a simple, yet flavorful marinade is a blend of soy sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar, pepper, and garlic.

While many growers see the calamansi as tiny decorative oranges and mostly ornamental, they are finding that the trees are problem free and easy to cultivate both indoors and out. They thrive inside the house in containers, as well as planted in the ground in tropical areas and zones with only occasional mild frosts. Calamansi is the result of a rare natural cross between two closely related genera, the Citrus and the Fortunella, and carries the characteristics of both the parents. The Fortunella parent, Kumquat, lends a dense shrubby habitat, small leaves and a hardy
constitution, whereas the Citrus reticulata, Mandarin Orange, lends thorns, tasty fruit and ease of peeling. So the Calamansi has small, easy to peel fruit with the sour acid flavor.

In Central Florida, calamansi trees yield abundant fruit throughout the year. When the trees are covered in blossoms, they emit an intoxicatingly sweet beautiful fragrance that carries with the breeze. Many of my neighbors and co-workers have been introduced with baskets of this sour, thin skinned citrus, learning how to make a refreshing drink that tastes much like lemonade: squeeze and strain the juice of several calamansi, add cold water, and sugar or honey to taste. It’s a superb source of vitamin C and has a light, yet unique flavor equivalent to freshly made lemonade with a tangerine essence. The fruits can be used just like you would limes, key limes, or lemons. So even if you don’t know how to cook any Filipino dishes, you can use to marinade and baste grilled chicken, pork, and seafood, or squeeze into your iced tea, cola, or rum.

The calamansi fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples, and to deodorize underarms. It is also a popular home remedy for cough. In addition to these, homemakers are awed by its power to remove heavy stains on fabrics, and as a subsitute for any of the ways a lemon can clean the home.

Calamansi, calamondin, Philippine lime – this versatile citrus fruit is the secret ingredient to many mouthwatering Filipino delicacies such as pancit palabok, Leyte kinilaw, beefsteak Tagalog, and arroz caldo. One of the most basic Filipino dipping sauces is made with soy sauce and calamansi juice, called toyomansi; and a simple, yet flavorful marinade is a blend of soy sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar, pepper, and garlic.

While many growers see the calamansi as tiny decorative oranges and mostly ornamental, they are finding that the trees are problem free and easy to cultivate both indoors and out. They thrive inside the house in containers, as well as planted in the ground in tropical areas and zones with only
occasional mild frosts. Calamansi is the result of a rare natural cross between two closely related genera, the Citrus and the Fortunella, and carries the characteristics of both the parents. The Fortunella parent, Kumquat, lends a dense shrubby habitat, small leaves and a hardy constitution, whereas the Citrus reticulata, Mandarin Orange, lends thorns, tasty fruit and ease of peeling. So the Calamansi has small, easy to peel fruit with the sour acid flavor.

In Central Florida, calamansi trees yield abundant fruit throughout the year. When the trees are covered in blossoms, they emit an intoxicatingly sweet beautiful fragrance that carries with the breeze. Many of my neighbors and co-workers have been introduced with baskets of this sour, thin skinned citrus, learning how to make a refreshing drink that tastes much like lemonade: squeeze and strain the juice of several calamansi, add cold water, and sugar or honey to taste. It’s a superb source of vitamin C and has a light, yet unique flavor equivalent to freshly made lemonade with a tangerine essence. The fruits can be used just like you would limes, key limes, or lemons. So even if you don’t know how to cook any Filipino dishes, you can use to marinade and baste grilled chicken, pork, and seafood, or squeeze into your iced tea, cola, or rum.

The calamansi fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples, and to deodorize underarms. It is also a popular home remedy for cough. In addition to these, homemakers are awed by its power to remove heavy stains on fabrics, and as a subsitute for any of the ways a lemon can clean the home.

Calamansi, calamondin, Philippine lime – this versatile citrus fruit is the secret ingredient to many mouthwatering Filipino delicacies such as pancit palabok, Leyte kinilaw, beefsteak Tagalog, and arroz caldo. One of the most basic Filipino dipping sauces is made with soy sauce and calamansi juice, called toyomansi; and a simple, yet flavorful marinade is a blend of soy sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar, pepper, and garlic.

While many growers see the calamansi as tiny decorative oranges and mostly ornamental, they are finding that the trees are problem free and easy to cultivate both indoors and out. They thrive inside the house in containers, as well as planted in the ground in tropical areas and zones with only occasional mild frosts. Calamansi is the result of a rare natural cross between two closely related genera, the Citrus and the Fortunella, and carries the characteristics of both the parents. The Fortunella parent, Kumquat, lends a dense shrubby habitat, small leaves and a hardy constitution, whereas the Citrus reticulata, Mandarin Orange, lends thorns, tasty fruit and ease of peeling. So the Calamansi has small, easy to peel fruit with the sour acid flavor.

In Central Florida, calamansi trees yield abundant fruit throughout the year. When the trees are covered in blossoms, they emit an intoxicatingly sweet beautiful fragrance that carries with the breeze. Many of my neighbors and co-workers have been introduced with baskets of this sour, thin skinned citrus, learning how to make a refreshing drink that tastes much like lemonade: squeeze and strain the juice of several calamansi, add cold water, and sugar or honey to taste. It’s a superb source of vitamin C and has a light, yet unique flavor equivalent to freshly made lemonade with a tangerine essence. The fruits can be used just like you would limes, key limes, or lemons. So even if you don’t know how to cook any Filipino dishes, you can use to marinade and baste grilled chicken, pork, and seafood, or squeeze into your iced tea, cola, or rum.

The calamansi fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples, and to deodorize underarms. It is also a popular home remedy for cough. In addition to these, homemakers are awed by its power to remove heavy stains on fabrics, and as a subsitute for any of the ways a lemon can clean the home.

Calamansi, calamondin, Philippine lime – this versatile citrus fruit is the secret ingredient to many mouthwatering Filipino delicacies such as pancit palabok, Leyte kinilaw, beefsteak Tagalog, and arroz caldo. One of the most
basic Filipino dipping sauces is made with soy sauce and calamansi juice, called toyomansi; and a simple, yet flavorful marinade is a blend of soy sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar, pepper, and garlic.

While many growers see the calamansi as tiny decorative oranges and mostly ornamental, they are finding that the trees are problem free and easy to cultivate both indoors and out. They thrive inside the house in containers, as well as planted in the ground in tropical areas and zones with only occasional mild frosts. Calamansi is the result of a rare natural cross between two closely related genera, the Citrus and the Fortunella, and carries the characteristics of both the parents. The Fortunella parent, Kumquat, lends a dense shrubby habitat, small leaves and a hardy constitution, whereas the Citrus reticulata, Mandarin Orange, lends thorns, tasty fruit and ease of peeling. So the Calamansi has small, easy to peel fruit with the sour acid flavor.

In Central Florida, calamansi trees yield abundant fruit throughout the year. When the trees are covered in blossoms, they emit an intoxicatingly sweet beautiful fragrance that carries with the breeze. Many of my neighbors and co-workers have been introduced with baskets of this sour, thin skinned citrus, learning how to make a refreshing drink that tastes much like lemonade: squeeze and strain the juice of several calamansi, add cold water, and sugar or honey to taste. It’s a superb source of vitamin C and has a light, yet unique flavor equivalent to freshly made lemonade with a tangerine essence. The fruits can be used just like you would limes, key limes, or lemons. So even if you don’t know how to cook any Filipino dishes, you can use to marinade and baste grilled chicken, pork, and seafood, or squeeze into your iced tea, cola, or rum.

The calamansi fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples, and to deodorize underarms. It is also a popular home remedy for cough. In addition to these, homemakers are awed by its power to remove heavy stains on fabrics, and as a subsitute for any of the ways a lemon can clean the home.

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