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First-person Narrative and Story

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    Jackson Crain Professor Coney English 1123-B Period 28 April 2013 “Luck” Mark Twain’s short story “Luck” is written in third person point of view making it seem like your there at graduation day with Scoresby, and the Reverend. This story is very entertaining because it tells the story about a Reverend a former instructor and soldiers in the military who describe a man that he used to be friends, with as an absolute fool. According to the Reverend, his old friend, Scoresby, is only successful because he is lucky.

    The Reverend in the story is described as an a very strict and was intelligent when it came to the judgement of men. while Scoresby is described as a sweet, fool. The first person narrator that Twain choose to tell the majority of the story is ostensibly a unnamed clergyman, a former British army instructor. The second narrator seems to be a unreliable one, because he says that scoresbys success come strictly from luck. The third person narrator is Twain, he is briefly the narrator of this story, given that he convinces the reader’s perspective by declaring this story to be a true one, and not a made up sketch.

    In this story, readers learn and comprehend about the life of Scoresby, a military hero, through the description of a clergyman who was once an instructor in a military academy. This was actually a story within another story. In fact, an anonymous narrator retells the story he once heard from the missionary. This story is told in third person point of view, the narrator participates in the action of the story, but it is biased on a limited view. Therefore, the reader should question the integrity of the story. From this story the reader will learn that Scoresby is not the brightest person.

    Being the nice man that he was, the clergyman helped him cheat to help him pass his exams. However, the clergyman was almost positive that a student so ignorant could not ever pass any exam, not even when he was favored. In the after mat on the battlefield, as shocked as it sounds, Scoresby won a lot of awards and became favored by many others. Mark Twain made the clergyman’s character out to be a very kind hearted man. This clergyman went way out of his way for Scoresby to help him pass his exams because Scoresby knew absolutely nothing. Basically, he had gone through his entire life based on luck.

    Twain’s short story gives the perfect example of luck. Scoresby has gone through his whole life not knowing anything. He was a soldier in every war and each one brought him another honorary title and many metals. Scoresby was very lucky to have a “friend” like the clergyman to help him pass his exams and let him take all of the credit for it and for everything else. This story shows that luck, or the belief in luck, can take one far in life. In conclusion, Mark Twain’s word choice and point of view choice makes “Luck” a very amusing story to read and to enjoy.

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    First-person Narrative and Story. (2016, Sep 03). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/first-person-narrative-and-story/

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