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The Advertising Board of the Philippines Sample

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The Advertising Board of the Philippines. besides known as AdBoard is composed of 10 ( 10 ) national organisations involved in advertisement that are unified together to continue the advancement of Filipino advertisement through self-regulation. Bing the umbrella organisation of the advertisement industry.

its mission is to pattern universe category advertisement along with recommending professional moralss through responsible and true advertisement.

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AdBoard was once known as the Philippine Board of Advertising. The board was formed as a consequence of a series of meetings in 1973 by leaders in the advertisement industry. They felt the impulse to perpetrate themselves in making a commission to accomplish their end in functioning the involvements of the state. The Board was established on May 3. 1974.

VisionWe are the voice of the Filipino advertisement industry.The polar force of a dynamic. comfortable. and responsible industry.

Mission* We recognize self-regulation as the basis of our being* We uphold the highest criterions of just drama and professional moralss.* We foster harmony among our members* We safeguard the involvement of consumers through true & A ; responsible advertisement* We create the environment where universe category advertisement flourishes.

HistoryTHE ADBOARD STORYby: Cid ReyesIt was the worst of times. it was surely non the best of times. On September 21. 1972. President Ferdinand Marcos issued President Decree 1081. With one shot of the pen. the dictator proclaimed exigency regulation. and placed the full state under Martial jurisprudence. The announcement was timed near the terminal of his 2nd and last legal term. With the obvious purpose of perpetuating himself in power. Ferdinand E. Marcos apparently used the steeping threat of Communism as a ground for the infliction of Martial Law.

Among other Acts of the Apostless. the dictatorial authorities instantly moved to suspend media operations. Due to the mass communicating nature of advertisement. the authorities needed to command it. Television and wireless Stationss and newspapers were closed. presenting a considerable blow to the advertisement industry. Merely one intelligence paper. the crony-owned Daily Express. was allowed to run after a one-day oversight. Media leader ABS-CBN ( Channels 2 and 4 ) which besides owned ABC ( Channel 5 ) . DZMT and DZWS. were all closed. With no media mercantile establishment available. some advertizers enterprisingly resorted to imaginative locales such as nightclub sets and entertainers singing their jangles. THE MASS MEDIA COUNCIL

Soon after. Marcos directed the formation of the Mass Media Council. supervised jointly by the Secretary of Public Information. Francisco Tatad and the Secretary of National Defense. Juan Ponce Enrile. In bend the Office of Civil Relations was assigned to organize all media activities. so under the charge of Colonel Noel Andaya. In January 1973. the Mass Media Council meet with the caputs of all communications associations in the Philippines to develop new and updated regulations for the behavior of media publicizing bureaus. At that clip. all media and advertisement bureaus were slackly classified as mass media. s Presiding over the meeting was Andres Cristobal Cruz. manager of the Bureau of Standards for Mass Media. an office of the Department of Public Information. Several councils were formed at the meeting. among which was the Council for Advertising. Public Relations. Research and Gross saless Promotion. It was headed by enterpriser Francisco R. Floro of Floro Enterprises.

A sub-committee was formed under the Chairmanship of Lyle K. Little. who was so president of J. Walter Thompson. The purpose was to hammer a Code of Ethics every bit good as Rules and Regulations regulating all those engaged in advertisement and gross revenues publicities. Participating in the sub-committee were representatives from the Association of Philippine Advertising Agencies. Philippine Association of National Advertisers. Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster nanogram Pilipinas. Lapian ng mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoners na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad ng Sambayanan. The Outdoor and and Cinema Advertising Associations of the Philippines. Print Media Organization. the Office of Civil Relations. the Institute of Mass Communications. and the Consumer Sector. Fifteen months after the initial meeting. this Council completed the Code of Ethics in March 1974. later approved and ratified by all take parting organisations. It was so submitted for blessing to the Secretary of Public Information. Hankering Makabenta. a member of the DPI. was assigned to polish the codification. and suggest appropriate alterations in footings of lucidity and preciseness. THE BIRTH OF THE PBA

The being of a Code of Ethics made outstanding the indispensable demand for a formal organisation that can unite the assorted sectors of the advertisement industry. Therefore. on May 6. 1974 the Philippine Board of Advertising ( PBA ) was organized. with the above-mentioned associations consisting the establishing members. The secretary of Public information released the Code on April 4. 1975. Because the Code was meant to be a life. dynamic instrument responsive and sensitive to the demands and alterations of the clip. extra alteration would be made in wining old ages. On June 19. 1975. the PBA adopted a revised version of Code of Ethics which included certain other alterations. More significantly. the revised Code identified and confirmed the PBA as the self-regulatory organic structure referred to in that codification. FRANCISCO FLORO – FOUNDING CHAIRMAN

The PBA elected Francisco as its initiation president. Appointed as the First Executive Director was Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. ; Vice Chairman. Antonio L. Cantero ; Secretary Santiago D. Olbes ; Treasurer. Napoleon R. Cruz ; Information Officer. Lyle K. Little. The office was located at the 2nd Floor. National Federation of Women’s Clubs Building. J. Llanes Escoda St. . Malate. Meanwhile Presidential Decree No. 756 of 9 November 1974 had created the Print Media Council and the Broadcast Media Council to replace the Media Advisory Council ( replacement of the Mass Media Council. ) This 1974 edict stated that:

Since the abolishment of the Mass Council and the creative activity in its position of the Media Advisory Council. the assorted sectors of mass media have shown capableness for self-regulation and internal subject within their ranks. and have demonstrated duty for keeping criterions for professional behavior and excellence. The Print Media Group and the Broadcast Media Group are herewith authorized to form and find the composing of a organic structure or council within each group. which shall be responsible for establishing and explicating systems of self-regulation every bit good as in the execution and enforcement of the PBA’s determinations relative to the advertisement screened… “Based on its experience so far. the Philippine Board of advertisement has informed the Department of Trade that it needs a more direct engagement of the Department to more efficaciously organize all determinations made with mention to instances affecting misdemeanors of the industry — promulgated Code of Ethics and other bing Torahs on unjust trade patterns affecting the usage of mass-media advertisement. “Pursuant. therefore to the powers vested upon me by jurisprudence. I am herewith directing that:

* All instances and/ or instances of alleged misdemeanors of recognized fair-trade patterns or Torahs affecting the usage of mass-media advertisement brought before the Department of Trade or any of its instrumentalities be referred to the Philippine Board of advertisement for proper hearing and adjudication ; * The PBA be authorized to test all advertisement as may fall within the legal power of the Department of Trade. In this connexion. at least senior functionaries of the section of Trade shall be appointed by the Secretary of trade who shall take part in the activities of the showing of the Philippine Board of advertisement. * The Philippine Board of Advertising shall subject its showing processs to the Department of trade for indorsements. * The countenances provided for by jurisprudence will be imposed by the Department of trade upon the recommendation of the Philippine Board of Advertising on parties found guilty of go againsting bing Torahs and/ or governmental regulations and ordinances relative to fair-trade patterns in the usage of mass-media advertisement.

“The Department feels that the execution of this basic understanding. which shall be covered by the necessary Department administrative Orders and Circulars. will heighten the development of the construct of self-regulation of an industry vital to the development of our national civilization. in the airing of information and in the behavior of trade. Finally. it is understood that this understanding is being formalized pursuant to the government’s doctrine that self-regulation by an industry frequently serves to instill a greater sense of duty. We wish the Philippine Board of Advertising success in this enterprise. ” The government’s indorsement of the original PBA Code was of import in order to emphasize that recalcitrant advertizers would non be let unpunished. However. the progressive extension of the prescreening demand has reduced the importance of this menace. since all broadcast commercials must now be approved in progress. thereby minimising the likeliness of station broadcast medium ailments. THE PHILIPPINE ADVERTISING CONGRESS

Coinciding the birth of the PBA was the 3rd Advertising Congress. held in Manila in 1974. IT was opportune that the fledgeling organisation should patronize the event. Appropriately the chosen subject was “A New Balance. A New Beginning. ” The proceedings of the Congress were centered on the induction and finalisation of assorted PBA declarations. including a representation with the Department of Information for the reappraisal of certain commissariats of the proposed Code of Ethics for Advertising and Gross saless Promotion. From hereon. the PBA would pull off and supervise all wining advertisement Congresss with the returns at that place from to represent the chief support of the organisation. aside from income generated from testing fees and rank dues. This was merely suiting. since the PBA now had the support of all the sectors of the industry – advertizers. advertisement bureaus. media and production providers. aside from the authorities and consumer groups. The advertisement Congress brings together the full industry to discourse current and relevant tendencies. reference jobs and seek solutions. and acknowledge the excellence of the industry’s originative merchandise.

Indeed. the history of the Philippine Advertising Congress would run parallel with that of the PBA. The Congress would go the traditional acme assemblage of the advertisement and selling industry. The first Philippine Advertising Congress was held in 1969 in Cebu City. The event marked the beginning of a series of advertisement industry conferences which traditionally. would convene every two old ages. The retention of the first Congress in Cebu City was consistent with its primary aim. which was to supply proficient aid to the provincial media. doing the event a important milepost in the development of local advertisement. More than 400 advertizers. bureau and media leaders and representatives participated.

The Congress was the first systematic attempt undertaken on a national graduated table to upgrade professionalism in advertisement and guarantee the development of the industry. It was envisioned and managed by Association of Philippine Advertising Agencies ( APAA ) . so headed by J. Modesto Ledesma. Two old ages subsequently. from July 29-31. 1971. the 2nd Philippine Advertising Congress took topographic point in Bacolod City. at a clip when there was already turning agitation in the state. with extremist elements utilizing the streets for violent mass meetings and presentations. The orientation and the subject of the 2nd advertisement Congress was “Maximizing Consumer Benefits Thru Advertising. ” Designed to run into the challenge of airting the concern of advertisement towards the public good. the Congress was managed by the Philippine Association of National Advertisers ( PANA ) whose so president was tasked overall Chairman. Alfredo Antonio of P & A ; G/PMC. THE CODE OF ETHICS

On November 24. 1975. the PBA held a imperativeness conference at the Plaza Restaurant in Makati. where it officially made public transcripts of the papers designed “to set up norms and guidelines for the advertisement industry in its attempt to do the profession more relevant and antiphonal to the developing society. ” Above all. the PBA said. “the Code of Ethics is the advertisement industry’s acknowledgment of the duty to the consumers of the merchandise of concern and industry. ” Trade Secretary Troadio T. Quiazon. who was the guest talker. lauded the drafting and announcement of an industry Code of Ethics: I can non overemphasise the importance and significance of this codification in the position of our times. ” “Firstly. the advertisement Code of Ethics is an facile manifestation of the wisdom behind the government’s basic policy of industry self-regulation. It is the government’s belief that we can outdo accomplish the advancement we desire for our society by affecting all citizens in this undertaking.

The advertisement industry has shown that it is equal to this challenge. “Secondly. the advertisement Code of Ethics comes at a clip of turning consumer consciousness about the quality of goods and services they buy. The codification provides the implementing regulations and ordinances that will give substance to the rule of truth in advertisement to steer responsible practicians of the trade. ” The launching of the PBA Code of Ethics received extended media coverage. The Dec. 4. 1975 issue of the Evening Express devoted a full-length column to the codification. The column noted that “the papers is the consequence of the attempts of the advertisement industry to set out an effectual usher for those who are new and who will be involved in advertisement and gross revenues publicities. ” Julie Yap Daza. of the Times Journal. wrote that “while the Code exists it can non be to the full effectual if we refuse its protection and deny our committedness to its cause. ” Daza warned that if “we allow it ( the codification ) to be nil but an exercising in idealism. we must non fault the PBA. we must fault it on ourselves for non desiring it to work. ”

The late Teodoro F. Valencia. composing in his column “Over a Cup of Coffee” declared that it was good intelligence for Television viewing audiences and wireless hearers. He urged his readers to assist “by being involved and argus-eyed. ” The “Consumers Observation Post” column of Ethel Soliven Timbol and Deedee Siytangco in Bulletin Today expressed hope that the guidelines set by the Code would redound to consumer protection. Write the editorialists: “The PBA has set in black and white what they should and shouldn’t do in chase of stating the public how good a merchandise or service is and why we should believe them. ” Furthermore. they urged Secretary Quiazon to necessitate mandatory rank of all ad bureaus in the PBA to efficaciously implement the Code. . Dean Cleotilde G. Protomartir. president of the “Kilusan ng mga Mamimili ng Pilipinas. Ink” wrote in the “Consumers Corner” of the Daily Express her praises to the Philippine Board of Advertising and Gross saless Promotion. ” She affirmed her belief that “consumers are now slightly assured of honest and honest true advertisement. ” IMPLEMENTATION OF TASK

On February 20. 1976. the PBA was deputized by Print Media Council and the Broadcast Media Council to implement their undertaking of “elevating the moralss and criterions of excellence in the mass media. ” It is to the recognition of the authorities that the prescreening of advertisement was entrusted to the industry. Ad. after all. was something that the authorities was non wholly knowing about. Ad was perceived as a less insurgent stuff. less unsafe to the province. Censoring of intelligence was already steadfastly in topographic point. in the outgrowth of newspapers. Television and wireless Stationss run by the dictator’s buddies. . DIRECT COMPARISON Ad

On December 27. 1976. PBA Chairman Francisco R. Floro released a memoranda informing the full industry that the PBA has approved the recommendation of the Philippine Association of National Advertisers ( PANA ) forbiding all direct comparing advertisement. Still under the chairmanship of Floro. the PBA managed the Fourth Philippine Advertising Congress which was held in Manila on October 21-23. 1976. The subject was “Bridge to the Eighties. ” The hot controversial subject of the Congress. was the smouldering issue of direct comparing advertisement. Based on the twentieth September 1976 opinion of the PBA ( which imposed a moratorium on direct comparing ) . the definition was amended. therefore: CALL REPORT

To function as the official “mouthpiece” of the PBA was a newly-launched publication named Call Report. The newssheet. disseminated widely to prosecute the active engagement of all the industry sectors. carried timely columns that reflected the alone jobs of the times. One article was headlined “How much longer do we hold to set up with bureaus who play it underhand? ” Lyle K. Little. president of J. Walter Thompson. wrote a column. “Pulse. ” which reported on advertisement groups in the U. S. and Europe. Call Report besides reprinted enlightening articles from Advertising Age. the official publication of the U. S. advertisement industry. Examples were “11 Ways to acquire the most out of your Ad Agency. ” and a long-running series. “What is Advertising? What Does it Make? ” significant research and study studies were besides published. Among these was one prepared by Antonio R. De Joya. Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. . and Pedro “Boo” Changco III. on “The State of the Television Business Today. ” To humor: “The twelvemonth 1975 was a battle for endurance for the telecasting industry. While charging in 1975 increased over 1074. disbursals besides swelled well. Many unrecorded shows were suspended or even wholly scrapped. There were more taped and international plans and shows than in old old ages. Other cost-cutting steps were similarly adopted by the industry as practicians streamlined their operations in response to the by and large bad concern clime for the industry. ”

Name Report was edited by Boo Changco. with Michael C. Grisdale as president of the Editorial Committee. PBA ROUNDSAnother column. “PBA Rounds” . covered the assorted activities of the industry – such as the election of officers of the PBA member organisations. updates in Congress proceedings and declarations. grudges from bureaus and advertizers. and homages to prominent industry personages. AIDA

An pressing industry demand recognized by the PBA at this clip was the deficiency of work force development. The issue continued to be a serious concern in the advertisement and selling industry. A effect of this was the deficit of adequate qualified advertisement professionals. unrealistic salary graduated tables. and the unabated pirating of forces b advertisement bureaus. advertizers and media. The PBA acted resolutely on this affair by forming the Asian Institute for the Development of Advertising ( AIDA ) . Elected officers were Antonio R. De Joya. Chairman of the Board and President ; Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. . Vice-President and Executive Director ( concurrent with his place at the PBA ) and Pedro A. Changco III. Assistant Secretary. The academic personal businesss commission was headed by Ms. Nanette Diyco and Father Alberto Ampil. In line with its aim of upgrading professional criterions. AIDA launched a preparation plan. a Basic Ad Seminar.

This was followed by more specialised seminars. The copywriting seminar covered assorted subjects and featured celebrated specializers in the field: Karl Steinbrenne ( McCann Erickson ) “The Copy Strategy” ; Mandy Labayen ( Great Wall Advertising ) and Gryk Ortaleza ( Ace-Compton ) “Writing for Print” ; Greg Macabenta ( advertisement and Marketing Associates. ) “Writing for Radio and Television. ” The seminar on Media Planning and Buying was designed to give participants a working cognition of the assorted audiences. range and cost efficiency of the different media and how they compare with one another. The talkers and their subjects were: Tony Tolentino ( PRC ) “How Media Define Markets” ; Pastor Escano ( Advertising and Marketing Associates ) “Distinguishing Media Capabilities” ; Minda Lansang ( JWT ) “Media Planning” ; and Eric Celis ( Atlas Promotions ) “Media Buying” . Slowly but certainly the PBA was doing its influence felt on the future leaders of the industry.

LAPPIS – Lapian nanogram mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoner na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad ng Sambayanan It may look as a wonder why the advertisement bureaus were represented in the PBA by two clearly separate organisations: The Association of the Philippine Advertising Agencies ( APAA ) and the Lapian nanogram mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoner na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad nanogram Sambayanan ( LAPPIS ) . Both were recognized as legitimate by the PBA. The APAA was the first association of the advertisement industry in the Philippines. Organized in October 1956. its primary aim was to advance and further the continued acknowledgment of the societal duties of advertisement bureaus. The 2nd. LAPPIS. was the inspiration of Antonio Cantero. who founded his ain bureau. The Group. in 1973. Bing in its babyhood. Cantero’s freshly founded bureau lacked the makings for rank in the APAA. which included all the multi-national bureaus.

With merely one newspaper allowed to be published during the Martial Law epoch. the APAA. harmonizing to Cantero. tried to corner its advertisement infinite through a contract which would forestall non-APAA members from acquiring ad infinite. This unfair intervention provoked Cantero into organizing an organisation of non-APAA members. Thus was LAPPIS formed in 1975. consisting of 26 all-Filipino bureaus: Cantero was elected as establishing president and president. Other officers elected were Vic Villafuerte of Commerce. Executive Vice-President ; Lucy David of Great Wall Advertising. Vice President for Internal personal businesss ; Quintin P. Pastrana. of Asia Promotions. Vice President for Developmental Affairs ; Rey David of Avellana ASSOCIATES. Secretary ; Vic Francisco of Viewpoint. Treasurer ; Dominador Inigo of Philconsultants. Auditor ; Diego Cantero. Jr. of Adtrade. Cirilo S. Martinez of Link. and Armi Aquino of Time and Space. GOVERNMENT ENDORSEMENT

A missive of 1 August 1977 from Trade Secretary Quiazon formalized the expressed indorsement of the PBA by the authorities. It read: “This will function to formalise our basic agreement…for a on the job agreement wherein the Department of Trade will supply all the necessary aid and support to the Philippine Board of Advertising in the showing of all advertisement stuffs. as internal subject with its ain ranks. ” THE ADBOARD STORY by: Cid Reyes

It was the worst of times. it was surely non the best of times. On September 21. 1972. President Ferdinand Marcos issued President Decree 1081. With one shot of the pen. the dictator proclaimed exigency regulation. and placed the full state under Martial jurisprudence. The announcement was timed near the terminal of his 2nd and last legal term. With the obvious purpose of perpetuating himself in power. Ferdinand E. Marcos apparently used the steeping threat of Communism as a ground for the infliction of Martial Law. Among other Acts of the Apostless. the dictatorial authorities instantly moved to suspend media operations. Due to the mass communicating nature of advertisement. the authorities needed to command it. Television and wireless Stationss and newspapers were closed. presenting a considerable blow to the advertisement industry. Merely one intelligence paper. the crony-owned Daily Express. was allowed to run after a one-day oversight. Media leader ABS-CBN ( Channels 2 and 4 ) which besides owned ABC ( Channel 5 ) . DZMT and DZWS. were all closed. With no media mercantile establishment available. some advertizers enterprisingly resorted to imaginative locales such as nightclub sets and entertainers singing their jangles. THE MASS MEDIA COUNCIL

Soon after. Marcos directed the formation of the Mass Media Council. supervised jointly by the Secretary of Public Information. Francisco Tatad and the Secretary of National Defense. Juan Ponce Enrile. In bend the Office of Civil Relations was assigned to organize all media activities. so under the charge of Colonel Noel Andaya. In January 1973. the Mass Media Council meet with the caputs of all communications associations in the Philippines to develop new and updated regulations for the behavior of media publicizing bureaus. At that clip. all media and advertisement bureaus were slackly classified as? mass media. ? Presiding over the meeting was Andres Cristobal Cruz. manager of the Bureau of Standards for Mass Media. an office of the Department of Public Information. Several councils were formed at the meeting. among which was the Council for Advertising. Public Relations. Research and Gross saless Promotion. It was headed by enterpriser Francisco R. Floro of Floro Enterprises.

A sub-committee was formed under the Chairmanship of Lyle K. Little. who was so president of J. Walter Thompson. The purpose was to hammer a Code of Ethics every bit good as Rules and Regulations regulating all those engaged in advertisement and gross revenues publicities. Participating in the sub-committee were representatives from the Association of Philippine Advertising Agencies. Philippine Association of National Advertisers. Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster nanogram Pilipinas. Lapian ng mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoners na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad ng Sambayanan. The Outdoor and and Cinema Advertising Associations of the Philippines. Print Media Organization. the Office of Civil Relations. the Institute of Mass Communications. and the Consumer Sector. Fifteen months after the initial meeting. this Council completed the Code of Ethics in March 1974. later approved and ratified by all take parting organisations. It was so submitted for blessing to the Secretary of Public Information. Hankering Makabenta. a member of the DPI. was assigned to polish the codification. and suggest appropriate alterations in footings of lucidity and preciseness. THE BIRTH OF THE PBA

The being of a Code of Ethics made outstanding the indispensable demand for a formal organisation that can unite the assorted sectors of the advertisement industry. Therefore. on May 6. 1974 the Philippine Board of Advertising ( PBA ) was organized. with the above-mentioned associations consisting the establishing members. The secretary of Public information released the Code on April 4. 1975. Because the Code was meant to be a life. dynamic instrument responsive and sensitive to the demands and alterations of the clip. extra alteration would be made in wining old ages. On June 19. 1975. the PBA adopted a revised version of Code of Ethics which included certain other alterations. More significantly. the revised Code identified and confirmed the PBA as the self-regulatory organic structure referred to in that codification. FRANCISCO FLORO – FOUNDING CHAIRMAN

The PBA elected Francisco as its initiation president. Appointed as the First Executive Director was Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. ; Vice Chairman. Antonio L. Cantero ; Secretary Santiago D. Olbes ; Treasurer. Napoleon R. Cruz ; Information Officer. Lyle K. Little. The office was located at the 2nd Floor. National Federation of Women’s Clubs Building. J. Llanes Escoda St. . Malate. Meanwhile Presidential Decree No. 756 of 9 November 1974 had created the Print Media Council and the Broadcast Media Council to replace the Media Advisory Council ( replacement of the Mass Media Council. ) This 1974 edict stated that:

Since the abolishment of the Mass Council and the creative activity in its position of the Media Advisory Council. the assorted sectors of mass media have shown capableness for self-regulation and internal subject within their ranks. and have demonstrated duty for keeping criterions for professional behavior and excellence. The Print Media Group and the Broadcast Media Group are herewith authorized to form and find the composing of a organic structure or council within each group. which shall be responsible for establishing and explicating systems of self-regulation every bit good as in the execution and enforcement of the PBA’s determinations relative to the advertisement screened… “Based on its experience so far. the Philippine Board of advertisement has informed the Department of Trade that it needs a more direct engagement of the Department to more efficaciously organize all determinations made with mention to instances affecting misdemeanors of the industry — promulgated Code of Ethics and other bing Torahs on unjust trade patterns affecting the usage of mass-media advertisement. “Pursuant. therefore to the powers vested upon me by jurisprudence. I am herewith directing that:

* All instances and/ or instances of alleged misdemeanors of recognized fair-trade patterns or Torahs affecting the usage of mass-media advertisement brought before the Department of Trade or any of its instrumentalities be referred to the Philippine Board of advertisement for proper hearing and adjudication ; * The PBA be authorized to test all advertisement as may fall within the legal power of the Department of Trade. In this connexion. at least senior functionaries of the section of Trade shall be appointed by the Secretary of trade who shall take part in the activities of the showing of the Philippine Board of advertisement. * The Philippine Board of Advertising shall subject its showing processs to the Department of trade for indorsements. * The countenances provided for by jurisprudence will be imposed by the Department of trade upon the recommendation of the Philippine Board of Advertising on parties found guilty of go againsting bing Torahs and/ or governmental regulations and ordinances relative to fair-trade patterns in the usage of mass-media advertisement.

“The Department feels that the execution of this basic understanding. which shall be covered by the necessary Department administrative Orders and Circulars. will heighten the development of the construct of self-regulation of an industry vital to the development of our national civilization. in the airing of information and in the behavior of trade. Finally. it is understood that this understanding is being formalized pursuant to the government’s doctrine that self-regulation by an industry frequently serves to instill a greater sense of duty. We wish the Philippine Board of Advertising success in this enterprise. ” The government’s indorsement of the original PBA Code was of import in order to emphasize that recalcitrant advertizers would non be let unpunished. However. the progressive extension of the prescreening demand has reduced the importance of this menace. since all broadcast commercials must now be approved in progress. thereby minimising the likeliness of station broadcast medium ailments. THE PHILIPPINE ADVERTISING CONGRESS

Coinciding the birth of the PBA was the 3rd Advertising Congress. held in Manila in 1974. IT was opportune that the fledgeling organisation should patronize the event. Appropriately the chosen subject was “A New Balance. A New Beginning. ” The proceedings of the Congress were centered on the induction and finalisation of assorted PBA declarations. including a representation with the Department of Information for the reappraisal of certain commissariats of the proposed Code of Ethics for Advertising and Gross saless Promotion. From hereon. the PBA would pull off and supervise all wining advertisement Congresss with the returns at that place from to represent the chief support of the organisation. aside from income generated from testing fees and rank dues. This was merely suiting. since the PBA now had the support of all the sectors of the industry – advertizers. advertisement bureaus. media and production providers. aside from the authorities and consumer groups. The advertisement Congress brings together the full industry to discourse current and relevant tendencies. reference jobs and seek solutions. and acknowledge the excellence of the industry’s originative merchandise.

Indeed. the history of the Philippine Advertising Congress would run parallel with that of the PBA. The Congress would go the traditional acme assemblage of the advertisement and selling industry. The first Philippine Advertising Congress was held in 1969 in Cebu City. The event marked the beginning of a series of advertisement industry conferences which traditionally. would convene every two old ages. The retention of the first Congress in Cebu City was consistent with its primary aim. which was to supply proficient aid to the provincial media. doing the event a important milepost in the development of local advertisement. More than 400 advertizers. bureau and media leaders and representatives participated.

The Congress was the first systematic attempt undertaken on a national graduated table to upgrade professionalism in advertisement and guarantee the development of the industry. It was envisioned and managed by Association of Philippine Advertising Agencies ( APAA ) . so headed by J. Modesto Ledesma. Two old ages subsequently. from July 29-31. 1971. the 2nd Philippine Advertising Congress took topographic point in Bacolod City. at a clip when there was already turning agitation in the state. with extremist elements utilizing the streets for violent mass meetings and presentations. The orientation and the subject of the 2nd advertisement Congress was “Maximizing Consumer Benefits Thru Advertising. ” Designed to run into the challenge of airting the concern of advertisement towards the public good. the Congress was managed by the Philippine Association of National Advertisers ( PANA ) whose so president was tasked overall Chairman. Alfredo Antonio of P & A ; G/PMC. THE CODE OF ETHICS

On November 24. 1975. the PBA held a imperativeness conference at the Plaza Restaurant in Makati. where it officially made public transcripts of the papers designed “to set up norms and guidelines for the advertisement industry in its attempt to do the profession more relevant and antiphonal to the developing society. ” Above all. the PBA said. “the Code of Ethics is the advertisement industry’s acknowledgment of the duty to the consumers of the merchandise of concern and industry. ” Trade Secretary Troadio T. Quiazon. who was the guest talker. lauded the drafting and announcement of an industry Code of Ethics: I can non overemphasise the importance and significance of this codification in the position of our times. ” “Firstly. the advertisement Code of Ethics is an facile manifestation of the wisdom behind the government’s basic policy of industry self-regulation. It is the government’s belief that we can outdo accomplish the advancement we desire for our society by affecting all citizens in this undertaking. The advertisement industry has shown that it is equal to this challenge.

“Secondly. the advertisement Code of Ethics comes at a clip of turning consumer consciousness about the quality of goods and services they buy. The codification provides the implementing regulations and ordinances that will give substance to the rule of truth in advertisement to steer responsible practicians of the trade. ” The launching of the PBA Code of Ethics received extended media coverage. The Dec. 4. 1975 issue of the Evening Express devoted a full-length column to the codification. The column noted that “the papers is the consequence of the attempts of the advertisement industry to set out an effectual usher for those who are new and who will be involved in advertisement and gross revenues publicities. ” Julie Yap Daza. of the Times Journal. wrote that “while the Code exists it can non be to the full effectual if we refuse its protection and deny our committedness to its cause. ” Daza warned that if “we allow it ( the codification ) to be nil but an exercising in idealism. we must non fault the PBA. we must fault it on ourselves for non desiring it to work. ”

The late Teodoro F. Valencia. composing in his column “Over a Cup of Coffee” declared that it was good intelligence for Television viewing audiences and wireless hearers. He urged his readers to assist “by being involved and argus-eyed. ” The “Consumers Observation Post” column of Ethel Soliven Timbol and Deedee Siytangco in Bulletin Today expressed hope that the guidelines set by the Code would redound to consumer protection. Write the editorialists: “The PBA has set in black and white what they should and shouldn’t do in chase of stating the public how good a merchandise or service is and why we should believe them. ” Furthermore. they urged Secretary Quiazon to necessitate mandatory rank of all ad bureaus in the PBA to efficaciously implement the Code. . Dean Cleotilde G. Protomartir. president of the “Kilusan ng mga Mamimili ng Pilipinas. Ink” wrote in the “Consumers Corner” of the Daily Express her praises to the Philippine Board of Advertising and Gross saless Promotion. ” She affirmed her belief that “consumers are now slightly assured of honest and honest true advertisement. ” IMPLEMENTATION OF TASK

On February 20. 1976. the PBA was deputized by Print Media Council and the Broadcast Media Council to implement their undertaking of “elevating the moralss and criterions of excellence in the mass media. ” It is to the recognition of the authorities that the prescreening of advertisement was entrusted to the industry. Ad. after all. was something that the authorities was non wholly knowing about. Ad was perceived as a less insurgent stuff. less unsafe to the province. Censoring of intelligence was already steadfastly in topographic point. in the outgrowth of newspapers. Television and wireless Stationss run by the dictator’s buddies. . DIRECT COMPARISON Ad

On December 27. 1976. PBA Chairman Francisco R. Floro released a memoranda informing the full industry that the PBA has approved the recommendation of the Philippine Association of National Advertisers ( PANA ) forbiding all direct comparing advertisement. Still under the chairmanship of Floro. the PBA managed the Fourth Philippine Advertising Congress which was held in Manila on October 21-23. 1976. The subject was “Bridge to the Eighties. ” The hot controversial subject of the Congress. was the smouldering issue of direct comparing advertisement. Based on the twentieth September 1976 opinion of the PBA ( which imposed a moratorium on direct comparing ) . the definition was amended. therefore: CALL REPORT

To function as the official “mouthpiece” of the PBA was a newly-launched publication named Call Report. The newssheet. disseminated widely to prosecute the active engagement of all the industry sectors. carried timely columns that reflected the alone jobs of the times. One article was headlined “How much longer do we hold to set up with bureaus who play it underhand? ” Lyle K. Little. president of J. Walter Thompson. wrote a column. “Pulse. ” which reported on advertisement groups in the U. S. and Europe. Call Report besides reprinted enlightening articles from Advertising Age. the official publication of the U. S. advertisement industry.

Examples were “11 Ways to acquire the most out of your Ad Agency. ” and a long-running series. “What is Advertising? What Does it Make? ” significant research and study studies were besides published. Among these was one prepared by Antonio R. De Joya. Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. . and Pedro “Boo” Changco III. on “The State of the Television Business Today. ” To humor: “The twelvemonth 1975 was a battle for endurance for the telecasting industry. While charging in 1975 increased over 1074. disbursals besides swelled well. Many unrecorded shows were suspended or even wholly scrapped. There were more taped and international plans and shows than in old old ages. Other cost-cutting steps were similarly adopted by the industry as practicians streamlined their operations in response to the by and large bad concern clime for the industry. ”

Name Report was edited by Boo Changco. with Michael C. Grisdale as president of the Editorial Committee. PBA ROUNDSAnother column. “PBA Rounds” . covered the assorted activities of the industry – such as the election of officers of the PBA member organisations. updates in Congress proceedings and declarations. grudges from bureaus and advertizers. and homages to prominent industry personages. AIDA

An pressing industry demand recognized by the PBA at this clip was the deficiency of work force development. The issue continued to be a serious concern in the advertisement and selling industry. A effect of this was the deficit of adequate qualified advertisement professionals. unrealistic salary graduated tables. and the unabated pirating of forces b advertisement bureaus. advertizers and media. The PBA acted resolutely on this affair by forming the Asian Institute for the Development of Advertising ( AIDA ) . Elected officers were Antonio R. De Joya. Chairman of the Board and President ; Oscar P. Lagman. Jr. . Vice-President and Executive Director ( concurrent with his place at the PBA ) and Pedro A. Changco III. Assistant Secretary. The academic personal businesss commission was headed by Ms. Nanette Diyco and Father Alberto Ampil. In line with its aim of upgrading professional criterions. AIDA launched a preparation plan. a Basic Ad Seminar. This was followed by more specialised seminars.

The copywriting seminar covered assorted subjects and featured celebrated specializers in the field: Karl Steinbrenne ( McCann Erickson ) “The Copy Strategy” ; Mandy Labayen ( Great Wall Advertising ) and Gryk Ortaleza ( Ace-Compton ) “Writing for Print” ; Greg Macabenta ( advertisement and Marketing Associates. ) “Writing for Radio and Television. ” The seminar on Media Planning and Buying was designed to give participants a working cognition of the assorted audiences. range and cost efficiency of the different media and how they compare with one another. The talkers and their subjects were: Tony Tolentino ( PRC ) “How Media Define Markets” ; Pastor Escano ( Advertising and Marketing Associates ) “Distinguishing Media Capabilities” ; Minda Lansang ( JWT ) “Media Planning” ; and Eric Celis ( Atlas Promotions ) “Media Buying” . Slowly but certainly the PBA was doing its influence felt on the future leaders of the industry.

LAPPIS – Lapian nanogram mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoner na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad ng Sambayanan It may look as a wonder why the advertisement bureaus were represented in the PBA by two clearly separate organisations: The Association of the Philippine Advertising Agencies ( APAA ) and the Lapian nanogram mga Adbertaysing Praktisyoner na Pilipino SA Ikauunlad nanogram Sambayanan ( LAPPIS ) . Both were recognized as legitimate by the PBA. The APAA was the first association of the advertisement industry in the Philippines. Organized in October 1956. its primary aim was to advance and further the continued acknowledgment of the societal duties of advertisement bureaus. The 2nd. LAPPIS. was the inspiration of Antonio Cantero. who founded his ain bureau. The Group. in 1973. Bing in its babyhood. Cantero’s freshly founded bureau lacked the makings for rank in the APAA. which included all the multi-national bureaus.

With merely one newspaper allowed to be published during the Martial Law epoch. the APAA. harmonizing to Cantero. tried to corner its advertisement infinite through a contract which would forestall non-APAA members from acquiring ad infinite. This unfair intervention provoked Cantero into organizing an organisation of non-APAA members. Thus was LAPPIS formed in 1975. consisting of 26 all-Filipino bureaus: Cantero was elected as establishing president and president. Other officers elected were Vic Villafuerte of Commerce. Executive Vice-President ; Lucy David of Great Wall Advertising. Vice President for Internal personal businesss ; Quintin P. Pastrana. of Asia Promotions. Vice President for Developmental Affairs ; Rey David of Avellana ASSOCIATES. Secretary ; Vic Francisco of Viewpoint. Treasurer ; Dominador Inigo of Philconsultants. Auditor ; Diego Cantero. Jr. of Adtrade. Cirilo S. Martinez of Link. and Armi Aquino of Time and Space. GOVERNMENT ENDORSEMENT

A missive of 1 August 1977 from Trade Secretary Quiazon formalized the expressed indorsement of the PBA by the authorities. It read: “This will function to formalise our basic agreement…for a on the job agreement wherein the Department of Trade will supply all the necessary aid and support to the Philippine Board of Advertising in the showing of all advertisement stuffs. as internal subject with its ain ranks. ”

Cite this The Advertising Board of the Philippines Sample

The Advertising Board of the Philippines Sample. (2017, Aug 27). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/the-advertising-board-of-the-philippines-essay-sample-essay/

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