Promoting children and CYP’s positive behaviour

1. 1 Describe the policies and procedures of the setting relevant to promoting children and young people’s positive behaviour. Behaviour is the way in which we act, speak and treat other people and our environment. Children and young people whose early social and emotional development is positive are more likely to make friends, settle well into school and understand how to behave appropriately in different situations. They have strong self- esteem and a sense of self-worth, but also have a feeling of empathy for others. They understand what the boundaries are, and why they are necessary.

Behaviour has a significant impact on current and later success for children and young people, in terms of their social skill development, education and employment. The policies and procedures within my placement is relevant to promoting children’s and young people’s positive behaviour cover a range of six sectors these are Behaviour policy/Home school agreements Code of conduct/Golden Rules Rewards and sanctions policy for dealing with inappropriate behaviour of conflict Anti-Bullying policy Attendance policy Physical intervention policy Every setting has got its own policies and procedures and all staff must use them.

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One of them is children’s behaviour policy. It is a document about how the staff should manage children’s positive and inappropriate behaviour and also contains procedures which information staff what they should do in a certain situations for example swearing, bullying, aggressive behaviour. A good policy also help new staff understand how to promote children’s positive behaviour and will also provide procedures to follow in situations in which a child is showing unwelcome or non-cooperative behaviour. Behaviour policies needs to be consistent with the care standards.

They also need to be regularly reviewed in order to make sure that they remain effective. Everyone who works in a setting must understand the policy and agree to apply the procedures consistently. This helps children to feel secure and most children to conform once they understand what is and is not acceptable behaviour. These guidelines are to all staff on how pupils behaviour should be managed. It is important that this policy is constantly being applied to ensure full safety of the pupils, this is why all staff MUST be familiar with this policy. Code of conduct/Golden Rules.

Is a set of rules/guidelines for the children so they understand how they should behave and what is expected of them. It is important that the children are reminded of the code of conduct so that it becomes their routine and they fully understand it. It is essential that positive behaviour is always promoted, praised and used as children notice when adult’s behaviour is out of character, if positive and professional behaviour is continually used it is more likely that the children will also behave in that way. The golden rules are a focus around the nursery and are visibly displayed for all to see within the classrooms.

The children learn about these golden rules from the day they start the nursery and it becomes a big part of the nursery. They recite the rules each morning before the day beings. Examples decided by the children When you are at kingfisher you should: Be friends Play with each other Use walking feet indoors – don’t run Say kind things and nice things Rewards and sanctions Although good behaviour is encouraged in the nursery, children will still behave inappropriate at times. Consequences for bad behaviour in my placement can take many forms.

Example is a child’s name being move from the happy face to the sad face and being on time out whiles others are playing or having an activities. Sanctions in the early years setting may include the removal of a toy or resource that is not been used appropriately or been used unsafely or some cases by removing the child form the situation. Anti-bulling Children need their own time and space. It is not always appropriate to expect a child to share and it is important to acknowledge children’s feelings and to help them understand how others might be feeling.

Children must be encouraged to recognise that bullying, fighting, hurting and discriminatory comments are not acceptable behaviour. In my placement children are to recognise that certain actions are right and that others are wrong. Bullying takes many forms. It can be physical, verbal or emotional, but it is always a repeated behaviour that makes other people feel uncomfortable or threatened. Examples of the policy at my placement is as follows: The Kingfisher Pre-school recognises that due to the age ranges of the children in our care that there will be cases of the children presenting challenging types of behaviour.

In order to ensure that inappropriate behaviour does not become the norm, particularly when it is directed towards other children in the setting, we try to promote the children’s understanding of acceptable behaviour through planned activities and routines. For the purpose of this policy and taking into account the ages of the children, bullying has been defined as follows:- Physical Hitting and kicking on a regular basis Verbal Name calling Indirect Regularly excluding another child from games and refusing to share resources with them.

If we feel that a child is consistently presenting a form of inappropriate behaviour towards the other children or adults their parents or carers will be informed. We will then work together in order to establish why this may be taking place and to develop a consistent approach to rectify it. The pre-school would like to emphasise that it is the behaviour and not the child that is unacceptable. Policy for dealing with inappropriate behaviour or conflict This only happens when there is a misunderstanding between the children as to everyone working with the children knows what is inappropriate behaviour.

Example is if an adult tell the children to tidy up and some other children don’t do it and the practitioner ignores the situation some children will not understand why other did not tidy up and this will create conflict in the children. In the year setting, it is likely that conflict will mean a child that refuses to co-operate. 1. 2. Describe with examples the importance of all staff consistently and fairly applying boundaries and rules for children and young people’s behaviour in accordance with the policies and procedures of the setting.

Boundaries are the limits within which behaviour is acceptable or what may, and may not be done. Boundaries are there to guide children and young people’s behaviour in the setting and it is very important for all staffs to consistently apply these boundaries fairly. Behaviour is learnt from what we see others do or say, so, it is very important for the staff to watch children closely and make sure that they apply the boundaries at all times. The importance of staffs applying the rules and boundaries are It helps children and people to know what is right from wrong.

For example, when a child knows what is right from wrong, or what is acceptable and what is not, then they will be able to do the right thing most of the time. If a child know jumping is not allowed in the setting then they are going to behave accordingly. If all staff applies the boundaries and rules of their settings, then children will not feel they are being misled. For example, one staff says they can bring snacks to nursery and another staff says they are not allowed to bring snacks. If this happens, a child will get confused and feel misled by one of the staff.

It enables all the staff to be consistent in their approach in dealing with behaviour issues. For example, if there is no consistency in staff applying the boundaries and rules then there will be chaos in the setting, and this will not help positive behaviour in children. But if there is consistency then every child in the setting will know that no matter whom they go to in the setting, they will always get one answer. As an early year worker one should be aiming to use preventive strategies to avoid unwelcoming behaviour rather than having to deal with it.

This means anticipating potential sources of conflict or danger and making sure that children are well supervised and have interesting activities. There are at times when unwelcome behaviour occurs and needs to be managed. It is also important that unwelcome behaviour is dealt with sensitively, intervention needs to be prompt, calm and controlled. There are several ways which a practitioner can intervene when situations are very unwelcoming. Time out is not to punish the child but them to calm down and step back from the problem.

It is should not be used on younger children as they can feel rejected and will not have the skills to reflect and calm down. But older children simply benefit from time out especially if a sympathetic adult can talk about why they are needing to clam down. Children should not be feeling rejected but rather the adult is helping them to avoid conflict or temptation. Explain the consequences of children’s actions This is to make children aware of the consequences of their actions. The child may not realise that throwing sand may lead to pain for a child who get it in their eyes.

It is also good to explain to older children what will happen if they continue to show unwelcome behaviour and this sets clear boundaries for them. Example is in my placement a child kept kicking a ball into the glass widow and I told the child that if he carries on kicking the ball into the widow I will have to take the ball away in case it breaks the window. Once I have suggested that there will be sanction, and it is essential that I carried it out. Sanction is not to threaten the child which can not be carried out other than that the child will not believe me another time. Removal of equipment or toys.

Taking away a toy or an equipment should not the final measures but may be necessary if the child been threaten with this sanction or are putting themselves or other children in danger. Example was at my placement when a child tries to put a rope on another child neck trying to play horses. I warn the child about the dangers in it the play but the child still was tempted to carry on so I took the rope away which I thought was a good idea to give children something else to do so that the child do not go from one inappropriate situation into another. Say a determined “No” Children response to this expression and understand it’s meaning.

It is important that a practitioner use it sparingly and that the child understand the ‘no means no’ and that the practitioner do not all the child to continue with the inappropriate behaviour. Example is in my placement there is an autistic child who really understands the word no but will continue to do what she is doing. The strategy I use for her to stop is particularly effective is to combined with facial expression and its useful in situation which children need to be prevented from doing something potentially dangerous. AC2. 1 Describe the benefits of encouraging and rewarding positive behaviour

It is important that the adult influences of the nursery recognise and praise the positive behaviour of individual child especially those who struggle to maintain good behaviour and tend to be told off more than others. It is also essential to praise constant good behaviour from children who never misbehave to avoid the development of inappropriate behaviour. Children respond to all kinds of positive praise. In my setting, the room leader and other members of staff often add positive words like ‘fantastic’, ‘brilliant’ or ‘well done’ when acknowledging their input towards the class.

We also use stickers and star charts to reward good behaviour. Giving the child a physical reward makes them feel that the efforts they make in their positive behaviour is very appreciated. The more we praise good behaviour of individuals, the more likely the child is to continue the good behaviour and maintain a positive attitude towards nursery and learning. 3. 1 Explain what are the agreed strategies in your setting for dealing with inappropriate behaviour. There are times when children might not show a positive behaviour. There could be many reason for any type of inappropriate behaviour shown.

Sometimes children and young people are just testing the limits of their boundaries or some times their could be far more serious reasons behind it. However in a situation like this practitioners need to recognise that when the child needs to be referred to others. Sometimes children’s behaviour could show some signs that they need some extra support. This mean that a practitioner need to recognise when children need to be referred to another colleague or a professional. However a childcare practitioner need to encourage positive behaviour and manage children’s common behaviour.

For example most children who are under three are likely to bite and snatch. This is not likely to referable as most children will eventually grow out of it. But a four year child is still biting, this will need referring. At my placement when confronted with negative behaviour, staff will be clear to distinguish between ‘disengaged’, ‘disruptive’ and ‘unacceptable’ behaviour. ‘Disengaged’ behaviour may indicate that a child is bored, unsettled or unhappy. With sensitive interventions, staff will often be able to re-engage a child in purposeful activity.

‘Disruptive’ behaviour describes behaviour which prevents other children from enjoying themselves. Staff will collectively discuss incidents and agree on the best way to deal with them. ‘Unacceptable’ behaviour refers to non-negotiable actions and may include discriminatory remarks, violence, bullying or destruction of equipment. Staff will be clear that consequences will follow from such behaviour, including in the first instance, temporarily removing a child from the activity session. When an incident of inappropriate behaviour occurs, staff will listen to the child or children concerned and hear their reasons for their actions.

Staff will then explain to the child or children what was unacceptable about their behaviour and that such actions have consequences for both themselves and for other people. Staff will make every attempt to ensure that children understand what is being said to them. Children will always be given the opportunity to make amends for their behaviour and, if appropriate, be able to rejoin the activity. Consideration will be given to the child or young person’s individual needs. Every effort will be made to communicate in the most appropriate manner in order to assist in an improvement in behaviours.

Children who need help in order to behave in an appropriate manner will be given support and consistent strategies to address the matter. Staff will seek appropriate training in order to reflect upon the triggers and effects for some children who find some aspects of the play environment stressful. Parents will be informed of inappropriate behaviour when picking up their child. The parent will be informed of the incident, how it was dealt with and how the child responded. In the event that unacceptable behaviour persists, more serious actions may have to be taken, in accordance with the ‘Suspensions and Exclusions’ procedures.

At all times, children will have explained to them the potential consequences of their actions. It is recognised that an incident of unacceptable behaviour is a stressful situation for staff and children alike. However, staff will be aware that there is also a need to be mindful of confidentiality and will only discuss such incidents on a ‘benefit to know’ basis. Where causes of incidents suggest possible abuse, child protection procedures will be followed. 3. 2 Describe different sorts of behaviours problems that should be referred to other professional. Biting :- Most children stop biting by three.

Its common in toddler and liked to frustration. As they still can not talk and express their feelings and find it difficult to control their emotions. If older children are still biting they may need investigation. Aggression :- While most children will squabble and toddler will hit out, older children should be more controlled. Aggressive acts such as hitting another child foe no reason need referral. Change of Behaviour :- If children’s behaviour change on certain days or who were fine earlier may need additional support. There could be many reasons for sudden change in their behaviour such as abuse, family separation or bereavement.

Sometimes a child behaviour change as a sign that they need help. Attention seeking:- children always need attention from other people and their behaviour can be a way of seeking attention. This means attracting the attention of other people. Some children may throw tantrums, cry frequently or refuse to settle at activities for a long unless an adult is beside them. Some may be hostile or jealous toward another person receiving attention. Children showing this type of behaviour may be feeling insecure and in need of adult reassurance. Bullying:- there are many reasons why most children bully other children in the setting.

It is important that this issue of bullying must be stop at once if notice by a member of staff as bullying is an issue with children under five’s and it can be a problem with older children and young people and should be taken seriously. Offensive comments:- some children may swear or use offensive words or comments that they have heard. They may not understand what they are saying just because they are angry of frustrated. If any member of staff have concern about a child’s behaviour they must first speak to the supervisor or the room leader or manager.

They have to explain what they have seen and they have to carry out further observation for that particular child. The parent of the child may be asked to come to the setting so that more information any be gained for the child. Sometimes unwanted behaviour is a result of medical conditions of or learning difficulty whiles might be linked to emotional difficulty that the child has. Before a setting refers a child to a professional for help, the setting may have tried a few strategies before referring to other professional. Here are some of the professional a setting can refer a child to for unwanted behavioural help.

SENCO (Special educational Needs Coordinator) lead the planning process and ensure that a programme of support for children with special educational needs is implemented. They take responsibility for ensuring that individual education plans are in place for each child with special educational needs. They also provide advice and support for colleagues in the setting. Behavioural support worker provide support for children whose behaviour is affecting their learning and development. They help settings to develop strategies for managing unwanted behaviour.

Speech and language therapist assess and put into place support programmes for children who have speech and language problems. They give advice to parents and the setting on exercise to be carried out with the children. Portage workers provide a home visiting for preschool children with additional needs. They also provide support for the children and their families. They may go to settings to discuss children with additional needs. Educational psychologist assess children and plan their support when they have learning and developmental difficulties that affect their leering.

They also visit settings to assess children that the SENCO has concern about. They also speak to parents to discuss how to best to work with the setting to meet the child’s needs moving forward. BIBILOGRAPHY Porter, L. (2002) Educating Young Children with Special Needs, Thousand Oats, Sage Publication. Special Education Needs; Code of Practice DFE2001. SEN magazines: www. senmagazine. co. uk Baker. R. (2008) Making Sense of Every child Matters, Bristol: Policy Press. Walker, G. (2008) Working Together for Children. A critical introduction to Multi-agency working, London: Continuum

Munn, P (ed) (1999) Promoting Positive Discipline: Edinburgh, Moray house Publications. Smith , I (1999) Is Praise a good thing? Dundee: Scottish Consultative Council on the Curriculum. Early Year Foundation Stage: www. education. gov. uk Ofsted: www. ofsted. gov. uk The department for Education: www. education. gov. uk current information on EYFS, National curriculum and SEN Code of Practice. Equality and Human Right Commission: www. equalityhumanright. com information about protecting and enforcing human right. Wall, K. (2010) Special Needs and Early Years: A practitioner’s Guide, thousand Oaks, Sage Publication Ltd.

1. 1 Describe the policies and procedures of the setting relevant to promoting children and young people’s positive behaviour. Behaviour is the way in which we act, speak and treat other people and our environment. Children and young people whose early social and emotional development is positive are more likely to make friends, settle well into school and understand how to behave appropriately in different situations. They have strong self- esteem and a sense of self-worth, but also have a feeling of empathy for others. They understand what the boundaries are, and why they are necessary.

Behaviour has a significant impact on current and later success for children and young people, in terms of their social skill development, education and employment. The policies and procedures within my placement is relevant to promoting children’s and young people’s positive behaviour cover a range of six sectors these are Behaviour policy/Home school agreements Code of conduct/Golden Rules Rewards and sanctions policy for dealing with inappropriate behaviour of conflict Anti-Bullying policy Attendance policy Physical intervention policy Every setting has got its own policies and procedures and all staff must use them.

One of them is children’s behaviour policy. It is a document about how the staff should manage children’s positive and inappropriate behaviour and also contains procedures which information staff what they should do in a certain situations for example swearing, bullying, aggressive behaviour. A good policy also help new staff understand how to promote children’s positive behaviour and will also provide procedures to follow in situations in which a child is showing unwelcome or non-cooperative behaviour. Behaviour policies needs to be consistent with the care standards.

They also need to be regularly reviewed in order to make sure that they remain effective. Everyone who works in a setting must understand the policy and agree to apply the procedures consistently. This helps children to feel secure and most children to conform once they understand what is and is not acceptable behaviour. These guidelines are to all staff on how pupils behaviour should be managed. It is important that this policy is constantly being applied to ensure full safety of the pupils, this is why all staff MUST be familiar with this policy. Code of conduct/Golden Rules.

Is a set of rules/guidelines for the children so they understand how they should behave and what is expected of them. It is important that the children are reminded of the code of conduct so that it becomes their routine and they fully understand it. It is essential that positive behaviour is always promoted, praised and used as children notice when adult’s behaviour is out of character, if positive and professional behaviour is continually used it is more likely that the children will also behave in that way. The golden rules are a focus around the nursery and are visibly displayed for all to see within the classrooms.

The children learn about these golden rules from the day they start the nursery and it becomes a big part of the nursery. They recite the rules each morning before the day beings. Examples decided by the children When you are at kingfisher you should: Be friends Play with each other Use walking feet indoors – don’t run Say kind things and nice things Rewards and sanctions Although good behaviour is encouraged in the nursery, children will still behave inappropriate at times. Consequences for bad behaviour in my placement can take many forms.

Example is a child’s name being move from the happy face to the sad face and being on time out whiles others are playing or having an activities. Sanctions in the early years setting may include the removal of a toy or resource that is not been used appropriately or been used unsafely or some cases by removing the child form the situation. Anti-bulling Children need their own time and space. It is not always appropriate to expect a child to share and it is important to acknowledge children’s feelings and to help them understand how others might be feeling.

Children must be encouraged to recognise that bullying, fighting, hurting and discriminatory comments are not acceptable behaviour. In my placement children are to recognise that certain actions are right and that others are wrong. Bullying takes many forms. It can be physical, verbal or emotional, but it is always a repeated behaviour that makes other people feel uncomfortable or threatened. Examples of the policy at my placement is as follows: The Kingfisher Pre-school recognises that due to the age ranges of the children in our care that there will be cases of the children presenting challenging types of behaviour.

In order to ensure that inappropriate behaviour does not become the norm, particularly when it is directed towards other children in the setting, we try to promote the children’s understanding of acceptable behaviour through planned activities and routines. For the purpose of this policy and taking into account the ages of the children, bullying has been defined as follows:- Physical Hitting and kicking on a regular basis Verbal Name calling Indirect Regularly excluding another child from games and refusing to share resources with them.

If we feel that a child is consistently presenting a form of inappropriate behaviour towards the other children or adults their parents or carers will be informed. We will then work together in order to establish why this may be taking place and to develop a consistent approach to rectify it. The pre-school would like to emphasise that it is the behaviour and not the child that is unacceptable. Policy for dealing with inappropriate behaviour or conflict This only happens when there is a misunderstanding between the children as to everyone working with the children knows what is inappropriate behaviour.

Example is if an adult tell the children to tidy up and some other children don’t do it and the practitioner ignores the situation some children will not understand why other did not tidy up and this will create conflict in the children. In the year setting, it is likely that conflict will mean a child that refuses to co-operate. 1. 2. Describe with examples the importance of all staff consistently and fairly applying boundaries and rules for children and young people’s behaviour in accordance with the policies and procedures of the setting.

Boundaries are the limits within which behaviour is acceptable or what may, and may not be done. Boundaries are there to guide children and young people’s behaviour in the setting and it is very important for all staffs to consistently apply these boundaries fairly. Behaviour is learnt from what we see others do or say, so, it is very important for the staff to watch children closely and make sure that they apply the boundaries at all times. The importance of staffs applying the rules and boundaries are It helps children and people to know what is right from wrong.

For example, when a child knows what is right from wrong, or what is acceptable and what is not, then they will be able to do the right thing most of the time. If a child know jumping is not allowed in the setting then they are going to behave accordingly. If all staff applies the boundaries and rules of their settings, then children will not feel they are being misled. For example, one staff says they can bring snacks to nursery and another staff says they are not allowed to bring snacks. If this happens, a child will get confused and feel misled by one of the staff.

It enables all the staff to be consistent in their approach in dealing with behaviour issues. For example, if there is no consistency in staff applying the boundaries and rules then there will be chaos in the setting, and this will not help positive behaviour in children. But if there is consistency then every child in the setting will know that no matter whom they go to in the setting, they will always get one answer. As an early year worker one should be aiming to use preventive strategies to avoid unwelcoming behaviour rather than having to deal with it.

This means anticipating potential sources of conflict or danger and making sure that children are well supervised and have interesting activities. There are at times when unwelcome behaviour occurs and needs to be managed. It is also important that unwelcome behaviour is dealt with sensitively, intervention needs to be prompt, calm and controlled. There are several ways which a practitioner can intervene when situations are very unwelcoming. Time out is not to punish the child but them to calm down and step back from the problem.

It is should not be used on younger children as they can feel rejected and will not have the skills to reflect and calm down. But older children simply benefit from time out especially if a sympathetic adult can talk about why they are needing to clam down. Children should not be feeling rejected but rather the adult is helping them to avoid conflict or temptation. Explain the consequences of children’s actions This is to make children aware of the consequences of their actions. The child may not realise that throwing sand may lead to pain for a child who get it in their eyes.

It is also good to explain to older children what will happen if they continue to show unwelcome behaviour and this sets clear boundaries for them. Example is in my placement a child kept kicking a ball into the glass widow and I told the child that if he carries on kicking the ball into the widow I will have to take the ball away in case it breaks the window. Once I have suggested that there will be sanction, and it is essential that I carried it out. Sanction is not to threaten the child which can not be carried out other than that the child will not believe me another time.

Removal of equipment or toys. Taking away a toy or an equipment should not the final measures but may be necessary if the child been threaten with this sanction or are putting themselves or other children in danger. Example was at my placement when a child tries to put a rope on another child neck trying to play horses. I warn the child about the dangers in it the play but the child still was tempted to carry on so I took the rope away which I thought was a good idea to give children something else to do so that the child do not go from one inappropriate situation into another. Say a determined “No”

Children response to this expression and understand it’s meaning. It is important that a practitioner use it sparingly and that the child understand the ‘no means no’ and that the practitioner do not all the child to continue with the inappropriate behaviour. Example is in my placement there is an autistic child who really understands the word no but will continue to do what she is doing. The strategy I use for her to stop is particularly effective is to combined with facial expression and its useful in situation which children need to be prevented from doing something potentially dangerous. AC2.

1 Describe the benefits of encouraging and rewarding positive behaviour It is important that the adult influences of the nursery recognise and praise the positive behaviour of individual child especially those who struggle to maintain good behaviour and tend to be told off more than others. It is also essential to praise constant good behaviour from children who never misbehave to avoid the development of inappropriate behaviour. Children respond to all kinds of positive praise. In my setting, the room leader and other members of staff often add positive words like ‘fantastic’, ‘brilliant’ or ‘well don

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