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Argument on Points of View

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Stories can be told from many different points of view. Point of view is defined as, the position of the narrator in relation to the story, as indicated by the narrator’s outlook from which the events are depicted, and by the attitude toward the characters. Points of view range from first person, second person, third person, objective, and limited omniscient. In first person, the story is told by a narrator who is also a character in the story. In first person, the narrator tells the story by referring to this viewpoint character as “I”.

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Second person point of view is one of the rarest forms used. In second person, the narrator refers to the character as “you”, which makes the reader feel as if he or she is the character within the story. Third person is the most common point of view used in stories. In third person, the narrator refers to the characters as “he”, “she”, or ‘it”. In the objective point of view, the narrator tells the story without describing any character thoughts, or feelings.

The story is told from an unbiased point of view.

In limited omniscient, the story is told from a narrator who plays no part in the story. The narrator knows all of the facts, and the characters thoughts. First person is the most effective point of view from which to render a storyline because the narrator is actually a character in the story, and the reader gets to experience all of the emotions, and thoughts of the narrator. The story “Keys Locks and Open Doors”, “The Yellow Wallpaper”, “Everyday Use”, “Why I Live at the P. O. ”, and “A Rose for Emily” are all told from first person point of view.

These stories have exceptionally interesting plots just for the fact that they are told in first person. In each story, the reader gets a firsthand experience at exactly what the main character is feeling because he or she is the narrator. In “The Yellow Wallpaper”, this story is told from the point of view of an unnamed protagonist. She tells the story from the confines of her room where she is recovering from her mental illness. The narrator in this story is very unreliable because of her mental state, which makes the plot even more interesting.

Because the reader is able to feel everything the narrator feels, the reader has a more literary connection to the story. “It is the strangest yellow, that wallpaper! It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw” (Gilman 439). This is an example of first person point of view. This also shows just how intimate the reader may become with the narrator because the narrator is specifically telling reader how she feels. Limited omniscient seems to be the most ineffective point of view from which to render a story.

With limited omniscient, the reader does not get specific details to inner character emotions. Instead of focusing on one character, and how he or she feels, the story bounces around to different characters. This literary method is not as effective as first person in heightening the readers’ interest. “A Good Man is Hard to Find” is a piece of literary work told from limited omniscient point of view. The grandmother in this story seems to be the central character, but the reader receives thoughts from every other character in the story. She said she thought it was going to be a good day for driving, neither too hot, nor to cold (O’Connor 370). This is an example of how point of view is expressed in limited omniscient. This is not the character speaking, but the unidentified narrator explaining to the reader a conversation she was having within the story. First person is the most effective point of view from which to render a story because the reader gets a firsthand account of character emotions, and there is an identified narrator which is more effective in heightening the readers’ interest.

First person usually uses pronouns such as, I, or we. Limited omniscient leaves the readers mind wandering, and while some readers may enjoy the curiosity, most would like for things to be straight to the point. In limited omniscient, there is no identified narrator, but rather someone speaking on behalf of all of the characters in the story. Limited omniscient is also used less frequently than first person, which for some, would take them out of their comfort zone because more stories are told from a first person point of view rather than limited omniscient.

Cite this Argument on Points of View

Argument on Points of View. (2017, Mar 29). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/argument-essay-on-points-of-view/

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