Brave New World Essay

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, while showing the future possible advances of science and technology, is actually warning people of what science could become - Brave New World Essay introduction. In the Foreword of Brave New World, Huxley states, “The theme of Brave New World is not the advancement of science as such, it is the advancement of science as it affects human individuals” (11). He is not suggesting that this is how science should advance, but that science will advance the way that people allow it to. The novel is not supposed to depict a “utopian” society by any means, but it is supposed to disturb the reader and warn him not to fall into this social decay.

Huxley uses irony to exploit both communism and American capitalism created by Ford. Huxley’s first example of irony is that he shows elements of communism in the World State. Dictatorship is an element of communism and is shown in Brave New World by means of the World Controller, Mustapha Mond. In the World State, people “belong” to everyone else. Mustapha Mond, when lecturing students, says, “…every one belongs to every one else’” (40). This thought in the novel is similar to that of communism where everyone shares everything. In Brave New World, however, Huxley takes this thought to another level.

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Sex, in the World State, is encouraged to occur with everybody. Even kids are encouraged to participate. People are scolded for having only one partner. Fanny, Lenina’s friends said, “I really do think you ought to be careful. It’s such horribly bad form to go on and on like this with one man…” (41). Lenina could possibly be punished for “having” only one man. This is how Huxley uses satire to exploit communism. Huxley also uses irony to show that consumption is becoming a religion in America. Henry Ford is a god in this novel because he invented the assembly line. The assembly line creates a means for mass production of items.

In the novel, mass production is how people are born. Because of this, Ford is an ideal god for the World State. He symbolizes a religion that lets a ruler rob people of their individuality for progress and stability. People in the novel use the name of Ford like people today use God’s name. Bernard, when talking to Lenina, said, “…for Ford’s sake, be quiet! ’” (90). This means that they see Henry Ford as their God. Huxley also uses the “T,” as in the model-T, instead of the cross as a symbol of what the people worship. This is a perfect example of how Huxley uses irony in Brave New World to show how people have made technology their god.

Aldous Huxley uses many examples of irony in Brave New World. The entire theme of the novel is one predominant example of this. Huxley warns people that society could become like the World State if the people allow it. He also uses satire to exploit communism. He gives the example that everyone belongs to everyone else, like the communists believe that everything they have goes to the government. Huxley also uses Ford as a god to show society what it has become. By creating a brave new world without morality, individuality, and religion, Huxley ironically shows their importance in society.

Brave New World Essay

The boy is then sent to a psychologist and the Director starts to discuss reproduction when he is interrupted by Mustache Mood, who is one of the ten World Controllers - Brave New World Essay introduction. Huxley creates a tone of irony which is tied to the novel’s theme of not assimilating to society’s norms and regulations shown by the use of repetition, metaphor, and diction. In this scene, Mustache Mood uses a metaphor to help the children gain a better understanding of what he is trying to explain.

Mood compares a pipe with flowing water to emotions. Mood continues to explain that the water flowing in the pipe represents human emotions. Mood tells the children to, “Think of water under pressure in a pipe. ” Mustache Mood pierces a hole in the pipe and describes the water shooting out as, “a Jet! ” Mood then pierces the pipe twenty times causing twenty, “piddling little fountains. ” The strong Jet represents a strong emotion which is out of control and not calm like the twenty holes which pour out evenly.

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From this metaphor, Mood insinuated that strong emotions are unsound because, “The urge has but a single outlet” causing instability. The twenty holes in the pipe represent stability because there was more than one outlet for the water to pour out of. This metaphor allows the children to grasp a better understanding for the creation of the World State and the regulation it imposes on society. This was the reason for the creation of the World State because they believed emotions were the cause of destruction in the world before.

From Mood’s metaphor, the ironic tone is portrayed because the World State believes that emotions need to be repressed to achieve a utopia. By removing all the flaws in society, the World State created a society where there is no individuality and restricted everyone from expressing themselves the way he y wanted to. In the passage, Mood describes the lives of the people living in the past world saying, “These pre-moderns were mad and wicked and miserable. ” Huxley use of words such as, “mad”, “wicked” and “miserable” furthermore emphasizes the new view the World State has towards society.

The World State believes if your emotions were like the “High spurts “of a fountain shooting out like a “wild Jet” then you wouldn’t be, “sane, virtuous, happy. ” Mustache Mood’s lack of understanding of society is seen here as he is basing these statements from his own values. This again wows the ironic tone of the novel as Mustache Mood blind to the fact that his values how it is in the World State, emotionless. Mood fails to understand how society was able to enjoy life back then without the use of the drug soma to repress human emotions.

You can tell Mood does not understand how the citizens of the past society were able to enjoy life as he lists the flaws seen in the past society saying, “What with mothers and lovers, what with the prohibitions they were not conditioned to obey, what with the temptations and the lonely remorse, what with all the sissies and the endless isolating pain, what with the uncertainties and the poverty ?they were forced to feel strongly. And feeling strongly ( and strongly, what was more, in solitude in hopelessly individual isolation. From this list, you can tell Mood viewed the past society as very flawed and unable to operate as a functional society due to lack of regulation. From Huxley use of repetition in this quote by repeating, ” what with ” , it accentuates Moods misunderstanding of society past which allows us to see the ironic tone of the novel. Through Aloud Huxley use of literary devices such as repetition, metaphors, and action, we are able to see the ironic tone of the novel which directly ties into the overall thematic meaning of the importance of being an individual.

Aloud Huxley views towards society are that people need to strive for individuality and not follow what society think is best for you. Huxley sees emotions as a part of what makes us who we are and not something that should be repressed. The theme represented in the novel which is helped conveyed from the tone and use of literary devices is that if you fall deep into society’s regulations you will lose the person you are and what makes you an individual.

Brave New World Essay

Chapter 11
Finally—and this was by far the strongest reason for people’s not wanting to see poor Linda—there was her appearance - Brave New World Essay introduction. Fat; having lost her youth; with bad teeth, and a blotched complexion, and that figure (Ford!)—you simply couldn’t look at her without feeling sick, yes, positively sick.

Chapter 11
Fat; having lost her youth; with bad teeth, and a blotched complexion, and that figure (Ford!)—you simply couldn’t look at her without feeling sick, yes, positively sick.

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Chapter 11
The return to civilization was for her the return to soma, was the possibility of lying in bed and taking holiday after holiday, without ever having to come back to a headache or a fit of vomiting, without ever being made to feel as you always felt after peyotl, as though you’d done something so shamefully anti-social that you could never hold up your head again. Drug that made you feel sick

Chapter 11
Shaw at first demurred; then let her have what she wanted. She took as much as twenty grammes a day.

Chapter 11
John began to understand. “Eternity was in our lips and eyes,” he murmured. “Eh?”

Chapter 11
“Of course,” Dr. Shaw went on, “you can’t allow people to go popping off into eternity if they’ve got any serious work to do. But as she hasn’t got any serious work …” “All the same,” John persisted, “I don’t believe it’s right.”

Chapter 11
“And I had six girls last week,” he confided to Helm-holtz Watson.

February 25, 2013 Chapter 11
This is partly due, no doubt, to the fact that he has heard them talked about by the woman Linda, his m—.” (Mustapha Mond frowned. “Does the fool think I’m too squeamish to see the word written out at full length?”)

Chapter 11
Mustapha Mond’s anger gave place almost at once to mirth. The idea of this creature solemnly lecturing him—him—about the social order was really too grotesque. The man must have gone mad.

Chapter 11
At Eton they alighted on the roof of Upper School.

Chapter 11
On the opposite side of School Yard, the fifty-two stories of Lupton’s Tower gleamed white in the sunshine.

Chapter 11
College on their left and, on their right, the School Community Singery reared their venerable piles of ferro-concrete and vita-glass. In the centre of the quadrangle stood the quaint old chrome-steel statue of Our Ford.

Chapter 11
Bernard, meanwhile, had taken a strong fancy to Miss Keate.

Chapter 11
Miss Keate smiled (and her smile was really charming, he thought); said Thank you; would be delighted to come to one of his parties.

Chapter 11
“Most of our girls are freemartins, of course.
Not fertile ;unable to have kids

Chapter 11
A click; the room was darkened; and suddenly, on the screen above the Master’s head, there were the Penitentes of Acoma prostrating themselves before Our Lady, and wailing as John had heard them wail, confessing their sins before Jesus on the Cross, before the eagle image of Pookong.

Chapter 11
Still wailing, the Penitentes rose to their feet, stripped off their upper garments and, with knotted whips, began to beat themselves, blow after blow.

Chapter 11
All the best toys are kept there, and they get chocolate cream on death days. They learn to take dying as a matter of course.” “Like any other physiological process,” put in the Head Mistress professionally.

Chapter 11
“Like any other physiological process,” put in the Head Mistress professionally.

Chapter 11
Crowds of lower-caste workers were queued up in front of the monorail station—seven or eight hundred Gamma, Delta and Epsilon men and women, with not more than a dozen faces and statures between them.

Chapter 11
He took John’s arm affectionately and they walked back towards the helicopter.

Chapter 11
Had not the Secretary of the Young Women’s Fordian Association asked her to give a lecture about her experiences? Leninas experience of New Mexico

Chapter 11
“Take hold of those metal knobs on the arms of your chair,” whispered Lenina.

Chapter 11
The plot of the film was extremely simple.
About a negro taking a beta blonde and 3 alphas save her

Chapter 11
The taxicopter landed on the roof of Lenina’s apartment house. “At last,” she thought exultantly as she stepped out of the cab. She thought she was getting laid

Chapter 11
The taxicopter landed on the roof of Lenina’s apartment house.

Chapter 11
From its hiding-place he took out his mouse-nibbled volume, turned with religious care its stained and crumbled pages, and began to read Othello. Othello, he remembered, was like the hero of Three Weeks in a Helicopter—a black man.

Chapter 11
But if she took two grammes, she ran the risk of not waking up in time to-morrow morning. She compromised and, into her cupped left palm, shook out three half-gramme tablets.

Chapter 12
“But the Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury is there to-night.”

Chapter 12
“Ai yaa tákwa!” It was only in Zuni that the Savage could adequately express what he felt about the Arch-Community-Songster.

Chapter 12
And he spat on the ground, as Popé might have done.

Chapter 12
As for the women, they indignantly felt that they had been had on false pretences—had by a wretched little man who had had alcohol poured into his bottle by mistake—by a creature with a Gamma-Minus physique.

Chapter 12
Lenina suddenly felt all the sensations normally experienced at the beginning of a Violent Passion Surrogate treatment—a sense of dreadful emptiness, a breathless apprehension, a nausea. Her heart seemed to stop beating. John wouldn’t be showing that night

Chapter 12
And at once this possibility became an established certainty: John had refused to come because he didn’t like her. He didn’t like her.… Lenina thinks John didn’t show because of her

Chapter 12
Pierced by every word that was spoken, the tight balloon of Bernard’s happy self-confidence was leaking from a thousand wounds. Pale, distraught, abject and agitated, he moved among his guests stammering incoherent apologies, assuring them that next time the Savage would certainly be there, begging them to sit down and take a carotene sandwich, a slice of vitamin A pâté, a glass of champagne-surrogate.

Chapter 12
They duly ate, but ignored him; drank and were either rude to his face or talked to one another about him, loudly and offensively, as though he had not been there.

Chapter 12
Beautiful ringing voice with which he led the proceedings at Ford’s Day Celebrations, “Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury”

Chapter 12
And she had shown Bernard the little golden zipper-fastening in the form of a T which the Arch-Songster had given her as a memento of the week-end she had spent at Lambeth. To meet the Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury and Mr. Savage. Bernard had proclaimed his triumph on every invitation card.

Chapter 12
and even (it was lucky that Bernard didn’t understand Zuñi) “Sons éso tse-ná!” What should have been the crowning moment of Bernard’s whole career had turned out to be the moment of his greatest humiliation.

Chapter 12
“Mend your ways, my young friend, mend your ways.” He made the sign of the T over him and turned away. -“Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury”

Chapter 12
A few minutes later, however, he thought better’ of it and took four tablets of soma

Chapter 12
Upstairs in his room the Savage was reading Romeo and Juliet.

Chapter 12
“A New Theory of Biology,” was the title of the paper which Mustapha Mond had just finished reading.

Chapter 12
He sat for some time, meditatively frowning, then picked up his pen and wrote across the title-page: “The author’s mathematical treatment of the conception of purpose is novel and highly ingenious, but heretical and, so far as the present social order is concerned, dangerous and potentially subversive. Not to be published.” He underlined the words.

Chapter 12
“The author will be kept under supervision. His transference to the Marine Biological Station of St. Helena may become necessary.”

Chapter 12
But in spite of this knowledge and these admissions, in spite of the fact that his friend’s support and sympathy were now his only comfort, Bernard continued perversely to nourish, along with his quite genuine affection, a secret grievance against the Savage, to meditate a campaign of small revenges to be wreaked upon him.

Chapter 12
Touched, Bernard felt himself at the same time humiliated by this magnanimity—a magnanimity the more extraordinary and therefore the more humiliating in that it owed nothing to soma and everything to Helmholtz’s character. It was the Helmholtz of daily life who forgot and forgave, not the Helmholtz of a half-gramme holiday. (Bernard was taking revenge on hemholtz because he was such a good freind and Bernard was ashamed )

Chapter 12
“It was over some rhymes,” he explained.
(Hemholtz got in trouble with authority for making a meaning full rhym. He almost got fired and now he’s a marked man)

Chapter 12
So cordially indeed that Bernard felt a sharp pang of jealousy. In all these weeks he had never come to so close an intimacy with the Savage as Helmholtz immediately achieved.

Chapter 12
“That old fellow,” he said, “he makes our best propaganda technicians look absolutely silly.” Shakespeare

Chapter 12
The Savage was reading Romeo and Juliet aloud—reading (for all the time he was seeing himself as Romeo and Lenina as Juliet) with an intense and quivering passion.

Chapter 12
He had managed, with a heroic effort, to hold down the mounting pressure of his hilarity; but “sweet mother” (in the Savage’s tremulous tone of anguish) and the reference to Tybalt lying dead, but evidently uncremated and wasting his phosphorus on a dim monument, were too much for him. Hemholtz laughed at this

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