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Intimate Alliance Between Religion and Good Education by Jose Rizal

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    As the climbing ivy over lefty elm
    Creeps tortuously, together the adornment
    Of the verdant plain, embellishing
    Each other and together growing,
    But should the kindly elm refuse its aid
    The ivy would impotent and friendless wither
    So is Education to Religion
    By spiritual alliance bound
    Through Religion, Education gains reknown, and
    Woe to the impious mind that blindly spurning
    The sapient teachings of religion, this
    Unpolluted fountain-head forsakes.

    As the sprout, growing from the pompous vine,
    Proudly offers us its honeyed clusters
    While the generous and loving garment
    Feeds its roots; so the fresh’ning waters
    Of celestial virtue give new life
    To Education true, shedding
    On it warmth and light; because of them
    The vine smells sweet and gives delicious fruit

    Without Religion, Human Education
    Is like unto a vessel struck by winds
    Which, sore beset, is of its helm deprived
    By the roaring blows and buffets of the dread
    Tempestuous Boreas, who fiercely wields
    His power until he proudly send her down
    Into the deep abysses of then angered sea.

    As the heaven’s dew the meadow feeds and strengthen
    So that blooming flowers all the earth
    Embrioder in the days of spring; so also
    If Religion holy nourishes
    Education with its doctrine, she
    Shall walk in joy and generosity
    Toward the good, and everywhere bestrew
    The fragrant and luxuriant fruits of virtue
    My First Inspiration
    Why falls so rich a spray
    of fragrance from the bowers
    of the balmy flowers
    upon this festive day?

    Why from woods and vales
    do we hear sweet measures ringing
    that seem to be the singing
    of a choir of nightingales?

    Why in the grass below
    do birds start at the wind’s noises,
    unleashing their honeyed voices
    as they hop from bough to bough?

    Why should the spring that glows
    its crystalline murmur be tuning
    to the zephyr’s mellow crooning
    as among the flowers it flows?

    Why seems to me more endearing,
    more fair than on other days,
    the dawn’s enchanting face
    among red clouds appearing?

    The reason, dear mother, is
    they feast your day of bloom:
    the rose with its perfume,
    the bird with its harmonies.

    And the spring that rings with laughter
    upon this joyful day
    with its murmur seems to say:
    ‘Live happily ever after!’

    And from that spring in the grove
    now turn to hear the first note
    that from my lute I emote
    to the impulse of my love.

    TO MY FELLOW CHILDREN
    Whenever people of a country truly love
    The language which by heav’n they were taught to use,
    That country also surely liberty pursues.
    As does the bird which soars to freer space above.

    For language is the final judge and referee
    Upon the people in the land where it holds sway;
    In truth our human race resembles in this way
    The other living beings born in liberty.

    Whoever knows not how to live his native tongue
    Is worse than any beast or evil smelling fish.
    To make our language richer ought to be our wish
    The same as any mother loves to feed her young.

    Tagalog and the Latin language are the same
    And English and Castilian and the angels’ tongue,
    And God, whose watchful care o’er all is flung,
    Has given us His blessing in the speech we claim.

    Our mother tongue, like all the highest that we know
    Had alphabet and letters of its very own;
    But these were lost — by furious waves were overthrown
    Like bancas in the stormy sea, long years ago.

    IN MEMORY OF MY TOWN
    When I remember the days
    that saw my early childhood
    spent on the green shores
    of a murmurous lagoon;
    when I remember the coolness,
    delicious and refreshing,
    that on my face I felt
    as I heard Favonius croon;
    when I behold the white lily
    swell to the wind’s impulsion,
    and that tempestuous element
    meekly asleep on the sand;
    when I inhale the dear
    intoxicating essence
    the flowers exude when dawn
    is smiling on the land;
    sadly, sadly I recall
    your visage, precious childhood,
    which an affectionate mother
    made beautiful and bright;
    I recall a simple town,
    my comfort, joy and cradle,
    beside a balmy lake,
    the seat of my delight.
    Ah, yes, my awkward foot
    explored your sombre woodlands,
    and on the banks of your rivers
    in frolic I took part.
    I prayed in your rustic temple,
    a child, with a child’s devotion;
    and your unsullied breeze
    exhilarated my heart.
    The Creator I saw in the grandeur
    of your age-old forests;
    upon your bosom, sorrows
    were ever unknown to me;
    while at your azure skies
    I gazed, neither love nor tenderness
    failed me, for in nature
    lay my felicity.
    Tender childhood, beautiful town,
    rich fountain of rejoicing
    and of harmonious music
    that drove away all pain:
    return to this heart of mine,
    return my gracious hours,
    return as the birds return
    when flowers spring again!
    But O goodbye! May the Spirit
    of Good, a loving gift-giver,
    keep watch eternally over
    your peace, your joy, your sleep!
    For you, my fervent prayers;
    for you, my constant desire
    to learn; and I pray heaven
    your innocence to keep!

    THE INTIMATE ALLIANCE BETWEEN RELIGION AND GOOD EDUCATION

    As the climbing ivy over lefty elm
    Creeps tortuously, together the adornment
    Of the verdant plain, embellishing
    Each other and together growing,
    But should the kindly elm refuse its aid
    The ivy would impotent and friendless wither
    So is Education to Religion
    By spiritual alliance bound
    Through Religion, Education gains reknown, and
    Woe to the impious mind that blindly spurning
    The sapient teachings of religion, this
    Unpolluted fountain-head forsakes.

    As the sprout, growing from the pompous vine,
    Proudly offers us its honeyed clusters
    While the generous and loving garment
    Feeds its roots; so the fresh’ning waters
    Of celestial virtue give new life
    To Education true, shedding
    On it warmth and light; because of them
    The vine smells sweet and gives delicious fruit

    Without Religion, Human Education
    Is like unto a vessel struck by winds
    Which, sore beset, is of its helm deprived
    By the roaring blows and buffets of the dread
    Tempestuous Boreas, who fiercely wields
    His power until he proudly send her down
    Into the deep abysses of then angered sea.

    As the heaven’s dew the meadow feeds and strengthen
    So that blooming flowers all the earth
    Embrioder in the days of spring; so also
    If Religion holy nourishes
    Education with its doctrine, she
    Shall walk in joy and generosity
    Toward the good, and everywhere bestrew
    The fragrant and luxuriant fruits of virtue

    To the child jesus
    Why have you come to earth,
    Child-God, in a poor manger?
    Does Fortune find you a stranger
    from the moment of your birth?
    Alas, of heavenly stock
    now turned an earthly resident!
    Do you not wish to be president
    but the shepherd of your flock?

    To the Virgin Mary
    Mary, sweet peace and dearest consolation of suffering mortal: you are the fount whence springs the current of solicitude that brings unto our soil unceasing fecundation. From your abode, enthroned on heaven’s height, in mercy deign to hear my cry of woe and to the radiance of your mantle draw my voice that rises with so swift a flight. You are my mother, Mary, and shall be my life, my stronghold, my defense most thorough; and you shall be my guide on this wild sea. If vice pursues me madly on the morrow, if death harasses me with agony: come to my aid and dissipate my sorrow!

    To the Filipino Youth
    Jose Rizal

    Raise your unruffled brow
    On this day, Filipino youth!
    Resplendent shines
    Your courage rich,
    Handsome hope of my motherland!
    Fly, grand genius
    And infuse them with noble sentiment
    That vigorously rushes,
    More rapid than the wind,
    Its virgin mind to the glorious goal.
    Descend to the arena
    With the pleasant light of arts and sciences,
    And unbind, Youth,
    The heavy chain
    That fetters your poetic genius.
    See that in the bright zone
    With pious and learned hand,
    Offers the son of this native land
    Resplendent crown.
    You who ascend
    On wings of your rich fantasy,
    Seeking from Olympus in the clouds
    Tenderest poetry,
    Sweeter than nectar and ambrosia;
    You of the celestial accent,
    Melodious rival of the nightingale,
    Who with varied melodies
    Dissipate the mortal’s bitter pain
    In the night serene;
    You who animate the hand rock
    With the impulse of your mind,
    And with prepotent hand makes eternal
    The pure memory
    Of the refulgent genius;
    And you, who with magic brushes
    Are wont to transfer to simple canvas
    The varied enchantment of Phoebus, beloved of
    Apollo divine,
    And the mantle of nature.
    Run! For the sacred flame
    Of the genius awaits to be crowned with laurels,
    Spreading fame
    With trumpet proclaiming
    O’er the wide sphere the mortal’s name.
    Day, oh happy day,
    Philippines genteel, for your soil!
    Bless the Almighty,
    Who with loving desire
    Sends you fortune and consolation.
    Sarah

    They Ask Me for Verses!
    I
    They bid me strike the lyre
    so long now mute and broken,
    but not a note can I waken
    nor will my muse inspire!
    She stammers coldly and babbles
    when tortured by my mind;
    she lies when she laughs and thrills
    as she lies in her lamentation,
    for in my sad isolation
    my soul nor frolics nor feels.

    II

    There was a time, ’tis true,
    but now that time has vanished
    when indulgent love or friendship
    called me a poet too.
    Now of that time there lingers
    hardly a memory,
    as from a celebration
    some mysterious refrain
    that haunts the ears will remain
    of the orchestra’s actuation.

    III

    A scarce-grown plant I seem,
    uprooted from the Orient,
    where perfume is the atmosphere
    and where life is a dream.
    O land that is never forgotten!
    And these have taught me to sing:
    the birds with their melody,
    the cataracts with their force
    and, on the swollen shores,
    the murmuring of the sea.

    IV

    While in my childhood days
    I could smile upon her sunshine,
    I felt in my bosom, seething,
    a fierce volcano ablaze.
    A poet was I, for I wanted
    with my verses, with my breath,
    to say to the swift wind: ‘Fly
    and propagate her renown!
    Praise her from zone to zone,
    from the earth up to the sky!’

    V

    I left her! My native hearth,
    a tree despoiled and shriveled,
    no longer repeats the echo
    of my old songs of mirth.
    I sailed across the vast ocean,
    craving to change my fate,
    not noting, in my madness,
    that, instead of the weal I sought,
    the sea around me wrought
    the spectre of death and sadness.

    The dreams of younger hours,
    love, enthusiasm, desire,
    have been left there under the skies
    of that fair land of flowers.
    Oh, do not ask of my heart
    that languishes, songs of love!
    For, as without peace I tread
    this desert of no surprises,
    I feel that my soul agonizes
    and that my spirit is dead.

    To the Flowers of Heidelberg
    Go to my country, go, O foreign flowers,
    sown by the traveler along the road,
    and under that blue heaven
    that watches over my loved ones,
    recount the devotion
    the pilgrim nurses for his native sod!
    Go and say say that when dawn
    opened your chalices for the first time
    beside the icy Neckar,
    you saw him silent beside you,
    thinking of her constant vernal clime.
    Say that when dawn
    which steals your aroma
    was whispering playful love songs to your young
    sweet petals, he, too, murmured
    canticles of love in his native tongue;
    that in the morning when the sun first traces
    the topmost peak of Koenigssthul in gold
    and with a mild warmth raises
    to life again the valley, the glade, the forest,
    he hails that sun, still in its dawning,
    that in his country in full zenith blazes.
    And tell of that day
    when he collected you along the way
    among the ruins of a feudal castle,
    on the banks of the Neckar, or in a forest nook.
    Recount the words he said
    as, with great care,
    between the pages of a worn-out book
    he pressed the flexible petals that he took.

    Carry, carry, O flowers,
    my love to my loved ones,
    peace to my country and its fecund loam,
    faith to its men and virtue to its women,
    health to the gracious beings
    that dwell within the sacred paternal home.

    When you reach that shore,
    deposit the kiss I gave you
    on the wings of the wind above
    that with the wind it may rove
    and I may kiss all that I worship, honor and love!

    But O you will arrive there, flowers,
    and you will keep perhaps your vivid hues;
    but far from your native heroic earth
    to which you owe your life and worth,
    your fragrances you will lose!
    For fragrance is a spirit that never can forsake
    and never forgets the sky that saw its birth.

    Hymn to Labor
    by Jose Protacio Rizal
    Now the East with the light is reddening
    To our fields and task we fare;
    By our faithful work sustaining
    Life and home and country there.

    Though the Earth be hard and stubborn,
    And the sun unpitying glow,
    For our country and children,
    Love and easy way will show.

    Chorus:
    “Our country forever!”
    May this our cry.
    “For thy sake to live:”

    “For thy sake to die.”
    Go then joyous to your labor,
    While the wife awaits you here,
    With the children from her learning
    To hold truth and country dear

    When night bring you weary homeward,
    Peace and joy will banish care;
    But if fate unkindly treats you,
    Love your dreary task will share.

    Chorus:
    Hail to labor! Blessed it!
    For it brings our country wealth;
    May we ever hold it sacred
    ‘Tis our country’s life and health

    If the youth would win our favor
    By this world should faith be shown:
    Only he who toils and struggles
    Will support and keep his own

    Show me then the way to labor,
    Guide our careless, wandering feet,
    So that when our country needs us
    We your work may complete.

    And the old men will call us
    Children worthy of their sire,
    For the dead are honoured chiefly
    By their sons when worth inspires

    “For thy sake to live”

    “For thy sake to die”

    The Song of Maria Clara

    Sweet the hours in the native country,
    where friendly shines the sun above!
    Life is the breeze that sweeps the meadows;
    tranquil is death; most tender, love.

    Warm kisses on the lips are playing
    as we awake to mother’s face:
    the arms are seeking to embrace her,
    the eyes are smiling as they gaze.

    How sweet to die for the native country,
    where friendly shines the sun above!
    Death is the breeze for him who has
    no country, no mother, and no love!

    To my Muse
    Invoked no longer is the Muse,
    The lyre is out of date;
    The poets it no longer use,
    And youth its inspiration now imbues
    With other form and state.

    If today our fancies aught
    Of verse would still require,
    Helicon’s hill remains unsought;
    And without heed we but inquire,
    Why the coffee is not brought.

    In the place of thought sincere
    That our hearts may feel,
    We must seize a pen of steel,
    And with verse and line severe
    Fling abroad a jest and jeer.

    Muse, that in the past inspired me,
    And with songs of love hast fired me;
    Go thou now to dull repose,
    For today in sordid prose
    I must earn the gold that hired me.

    Now must I ponder deep,
    Meditate, and struggle on;
    E’en sometimes I must weep;
    For he who love would keep
    Great pain has undergone.

    Fled are the days of ease,
    The days of Love’s delight;
    When flowers still would please
    And give to suffering souls surcease
    From pain and sorrow’s blight.

    One by one they have passed on,
    All I loved and moved among;
    Dead or married—from me gone,
    For all I place my heart upon
    By fate adverse are stung.

    Go thou, too, O Muse, depart,
    Other regions fairer find;
    For my land but offers art
    For the laurel, chains that bind,
    For a temple, prisons blind.

    But before thou leavest me, speak:
    Tell me with thy voice sublime,
    Thou couldst ever from me seek
    A song of sorrow for the weak,
    Defiance to the tyrant’s crime.

    My Last Farewell (Mi Ultimo Adios)
    by Jose Rizal
    Translated by Charles Derbyshire

    Farewell, dear Fatherland, clime of the sun caress’d
    Pearl of the Orient seas, our Eden lost!
    Gladly now I go to give thee this faded life’s best,
    And were it brighter, fresher, or more blest
    Still would I give it thee, nor count the cost.
    On the field of battle, ‘mid the frenzy of fight,
    Others have given their lives, without doubt or heed;
    The place matters not-cypress or laurel or lily white,
    Scaffold or open plain, combat or martyrdom’s plight,
    T is ever the same, to serve our home and country’s need.

    I die just when I see the dawn break,
    Through the gloom of night, to herald the day;
    And if color is lacking my blood thou shalt take,
    Pour’d out at need for thy dear sake
    To dye with its crimson the waking ray.

    My dreams, when life first opened to me,
    My dreams, when the hopes of youth beat high,
    Were to see thy lov’d face, O gem of the Orient sea
    From gloom and grief, from care and sorrow free;
    No blush on thy brow, no tear in thine eye.
    Dream of my life, my living and burning desire,
    All hail! Cries the soul that is now to take flight;
    All hail! And sweet it is for thee to expire;
    To die for thy sake, that thou mayst aspire;
    And sleep in thy bosom eternity’s long night.

    If over my grave some day thou seest grow,
    In the grassy sod, a humble flower,
    Draw it to thy lips and kiss my soul so,
    While I may feel on my brow in the cold tomb below
    The touch of thy tenderness, thy breath’s warm power.

    Let the moon beam over me soft and serene,
    Let the dawn shed over me its radiant flashes,
    Let the wind with sad lament over me keen;
    And if on my cross a bird should be seen,
    Let it trill there its hymn of peace to my ashes.
    Let the sun draw the vapors up to the sky,
    And heavenward in purity bear my tardy protest
    Let some kind soul o ‘er my untimely fate sigh,
    And in the still evening a prayer be lifted on high
    From thee, 0 my country, that in God I may rest.

    Pray for all those that hapless have died,
    For all who have suffered the unmeasur’d pain;
    For our mothers that bitterly their woes have cried,
    For widows and orphans, for captives by torture tried
    And then for thyself that redemption thou mayst gain.

    And when the dark night wraps the graveyard around
    With only the dead in their vigil to see
    Break not my repose or the mystery profound
    And perchance thou mayst hear a sad hymn resound
    ‘T is I, O my country, raising a song unto thee.

    And even my grave is remembered no more
    Unmark’d by never a cross nor a stone
    Let the plow sweep through it, the spade turn it o’er
    That my ashes may carpet earthly floor,
    Before into nothingness at last they are blown.

    Then will oblivion bring to me no care
    As over thy vales and plains I sweep;
    Throbbing and cleansed in thy space and air
    With color and light, with song and lament I fare,
    Ever repeating the faith that I keep.

    My Fatherland ador’d, that sadness to my sorrow lends
    Beloved Filipinas, hear now my last good-by!
    I give thee all: parents and kindred and friends
    For I go where no slave before the oppressor bends,
    Where faith can never kill, and God reigns e’er on high!

    Farewell to you all, from my soul torn away,
    Friends of my childhood in the home dispossessed!
    Give thanks that I rest from the wearisome day!
    Farewell to thee, too, sweet friend that lightened my way;
    Beloved creatures all, farewell! In death there is rest!

    Mi Ultimo Adios
    Adios, Patria adorada, region del sol querida,
    Perla del Mar de Oriente, nuestro perdido Eden!
    A darte voy alegre la triste mustia vida,
    Y fuera más brillante más fresca, más florida,
    Tambien por tí la diera, la diera por tu bien.

    En campos de batalla, luchando con delirio
    Otros te dan sus vidas sin dudas, sin pesar;
    El sitio nada importa, ciprés, laurel ó lirio,
    Cadalso ó campo abierto, combate ó cruel martirio,
    Lo mismo es si lo piden la patria y el hogar.

    Yo muero cuando veo que el cielo se colora
    Y al fin anuncia el día trás lóbrego capuz;
    Si grana necesitas para teñir tu aurora,
    Vierte la sangre mía, derrámala en buen hora
    Y dórela un reflejo de su naciente luz.

    Mis sueños cuando apenas muchacho adolescente,
    Mis sueños cuando joven ya lleno de vigor,
    Fueron el verte un día, joya del mar de oriente
    Secos los negros ojos, alta la tersa frente,
    Sin ceño, sin arrugas, sin manchas de rubor.

    Ensueño de mi vida, mi ardiente vivo anhelo,
    Salud te grita el alma que pronto va á partir!
    Salud! ah que es hermoso caer por darte vuelo,
    Morir por darte vida, morir bajo tu cielo,
    Y en tu encantada tierra la eternidad dormir.

    Si sobre mi sepulcro vieres brotar un dia
    Entre la espesa yerba sencilla, humilde flor,
    Acércala a tus labios y besa al alma mía,
    Y sienta yo en mi frente bajo la tumba fría
    De tu ternura el soplo, de tu hálito el calor.

    Deja a la luna verme con luz tranquila y suave;
    Deja que el alba envíe su resplandor fugaz,
    Deja gemir al viento con su murmullo grave,
    Y si desciende y posa sobre mi cruz un ave,
    Deja que el ave entone su cantico de paz.

    Deja que el sol ardiendo las lluvias evapore
    Y al cielo tornen puras con mi clamor en pos,
    Deja que un sér amigo mi fin temprano llore
    Y en las serenas tardes cuando por mi alguien ore
    Ora tambien, oh Patria, por mi descanso á Dios!

    Ora por todos cuantos murieron sin ventura,
    Por cuantos padecieron tormentos sin igual,
    Por nuestras pobres madres que gimen su amargura;
    Por huérfanos y viudas, por presos en tortura
    Y ora por tí que veas tu redencion final.

    Y cuando en noche oscura se envuelva el cementerio
    Y solos sólo muertos queden velando allí,
    No turbes su reposo, no turbes el misterio
    Tal vez acordes oigas de citara ó salterio,
    Soy yo, querida Patria, yo que te canto á ti.

    Y cuando ya mi tumba de todos olvidada
    No tenga cruz ni piedra que marquen su lugar,
    Deja que la are el hombre, la esparza con la azada,
    Y mis cenizas antes que vuelvan á la nada,
    El polvo de tu alfombra que vayan á formar.

    Entonces nada importa me pongas en olvido,
    Tu atmósfera, tu espacio, tus valles cruzaré,
    Vibrante y limpia nota seré para tu oido,
    Aroma, luz, colores, rumor, canto, gemido
    Constante repitiendo la esencia de mi fé.

    Mi patria idolatrada, dolor de mis dolores,
    Querida Filipinas, oye el postrer adios.
    Ahi te dejo todo, mis padres, mis amores.
    Voy donde no hay esclavos, verdugos ni opresores,
    Donde la fé no mata, donde el que reyna es Dios.

    Adios, padres y hermanos, trozos del alma mía,
    Amigos de la infancia en el perdido hogar,
    Dad gracias que descanso del fatigoso día;
    Adios, dulce extrangera, mi amiga, mi alegría,
    Adios, queridos séres morir es descansar.

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    Intimate Alliance Between Religion and Good Education by Jose Rizal. (2016, Jul 27). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/intimate-alliance-between-religion-and-good-education-by-jose-rizal/

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